Motorola Droid Xyboard 10.1 Review: Android For The Business World Discussion

Discussion in 'News Headlines' started by Grant Hatchimonji, Mar 14, 2012.

  1. Grant Hatchimonji

    Grant Hatchimonji Brighthand Editor Reviewer

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    <img height="311" width="250" src="http://www.tabletpcreview.com/assets/15808.png" alt="Motorola Droid Xyboard 10.1 Front" title="Motorola Droid Xyboard 10.1 Front" style="margin: 5px; float: right; border: 0px;" />There is no shortage of enterprise tablets. From the PlayBook to the ThinkPad Tablet to any number of Windows slates, business users have plenty to choose from. Though it seems like a slick consumer device, the Droid Xyboard 10.1 is Motorola's attempt to tap into that market.

    Featuring a larger form factor than its companion, the Xyboard 8.2, the Xyboard 10.1 has 4G connectivity,&nbsp;houses a suite of business-friendly apps, and comes packaged with a capacitive stylus. Do enterprise users have the device of their dreams on their hands? And how does the Xyboard 10.1 fare in other areas besides being business-ready?



    Read the full content of this Article: Motorola Droid Xyboard 10.1 Review: Android For The Business World

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    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 11, 2014
  2. snowcrash101

    snowcrash101 Pen Pal - Newbie

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    It's disappointing to read that the stylus implementation is so limited.

    Is this due to the hardware, i.e. not including a (wacom or n-trig) digitizer?
    And is it also a software limitation? (Do android writing apps have palm rejection?)

    How would the stylus input compare with the Thinkpad tablet?

    thanks for the review.
     
  3. Agent 9

    Agent 9 Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    @snowcrash101

    capacitive stylus = pinky/ sausage on a stick (no such thing as palm rejection as its a multi-touch capacitive screen so your finger, nose, or other appendages are seen the same as any capacitive stylus and always will be; so hand on screen + cap stylus = multi-touch input event); N-trig digitizer pen = moderatly decent pen (has issues, especially linking back to interference and the battery in pen design); Wacom digitizer pen = the best of the best for the foreseeable future; if you care about the finesse, accuracy, no fuss, and so on, then get yourself something that has a Wacom active digitizer as anything less will really really leave you wanting)

    As to the software, while Windows [7] is the farthest along of any OS I know of in terms of pen support, handwriting recognition, and proper drivers for the active pen systems, the others are advancing very very very very slowly (about as slow as glacially slow)... Android and iOS are awful in terms of pen support, though there are some very very rudimentary 'apps' out there, as well as sub-basic support by the OS and the rest of the 'apps' (at most you can hope for it to register like a touch input), not to mention the 'drivers' under android are very buggy and sub par as well causing lots of issues and little hick-ups
     
  4. snowcrash101

    snowcrash101 Pen Pal - Newbie

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    @Agent 9

    Thanks for the input.

    I have a X61T, which has pretty good inking and with a 4:3 screen. I only wish I could find something similar but much lighter (1kg or less).

    I've been tempted to look at android tablet alternatives but as you indicate, there's a way to go with the pen input.

    Currently, the Samsung Slate 7 looks good, but its 16:9 screen ratio really puts me off.
     
  5. cleft

    cleft Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I think Agent 9 had covered pretty much about the input method.

    As for the software, it is no doubt that Windows is the most advanced OS that a tablet should have. Still, provided that inkling is your major concern, a decent pen-based consumer tablet like the ThinkPad tablet might also suffice atm. N-Trig actually performs quite well on this tablet. The accuracy is surprisingly better than that on my Lenovo X201T. Also, the exclusive app named Writepad Stylus can be comparable to Touch input panel in Windows 7 with respect to handwriting recognition. However, as long as you stick with Android, you have to say goodbye to searching handwriting note feature in Onenote in particular, and much more than just that. Android-based is not a replacement for our PC either.

    Slate 7 is indeed attractive but I still prefer a convertible for flexibility. Anyway, if I wasn't so into the X201T's build quality, I'd give it a try.
     

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