Mind Maps Pro free until 3 July or so

Discussion in 'Windows 10' started by WillAdams, Jun 29, 2018.

  1. WillAdams

    WillAdams Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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  2. Shizaru

    Shizaru Scribbler - Standard Member

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    It's free if you have a M$ account or succumb and create an account. M$ don't provide any software worthy of me providing them with my data, and the day they force the requirement for an account to use their OS is the day I shuffle on to pastures new.

    I will stick with The Brain.
     
  3. Marty

    Marty Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    So you happen to also be a OneNote user? I'm curious to know if you find the mindmap structure to improve your productivity vs the notebook structure.

    I've always been on the fence about mindmaps because they felt restrictive vs free inking, but perhaps I'm just not using them right.
     
  4. Shizaru

    Shizaru Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I don't use one note in fact I try not to use any M$ products other than the core OS, apart from the Clock/Timer and calculator I can't think of any M$ apps that I use.

    Mind maps can be very useful imho - I have a crap memory so I tend to use them for keep track of things particularly topics I'm researching. There is a free version of The Brain which has a trial period giving access to the full pro feature set. The big advantage with The Brain is the way you can create associations between topics and key fields. For example you could research a topic and people involved, then you could associate projects they were involved with and past employment or group memberships etc. That allows you to see who has past associations and builds a picture of how they have interacted, it can help to discover influences or possible conflicts of interest etc. You can do similar things with books. The ability to insert snippets, media and links is also useful if you want to refer back or keep tabs on important bits of information.

    I don't think there is a right or wrong way to use them if the method you use suits the way you think. There are lots of people giving examples of the way they use them on Ytube. It really depends on what sort of data you're using, and how you want to present it to give you a better idea of the bigger picture, or to highlight patterns and trends etc. You can use them for simple project planning and events to make sure you don't over look things and that tasks complete on time etc.

    Like everything it's only as good as the data you put in and whether you're consistent when it comes to adding and maintaining the data.

    You can see some examples here https://webbrain.com/explore
     
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  5. Marty

    Marty Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Interesting, I guess my conundrum is the conflict between brain organization and brainstorming.

    I use OneNote to flesh out design concepts (inserting media snippets and file links as you described) but without any pre-determined "connections". All my concepts would just exist as separate "bubbles" on a mindmap.

    Put another way, I like having the connections between concepts arise from visual context or small inked notes, rather than be explicitly defined.

    Do you find you use mindmaps for designing and concepting, or mostly just for organizational purposes?
     
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  6. Shizaru

    Shizaru Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I cant say I use mind maps for concept development, well not in an artistic sense, although there is probably some degree of semiconscious thought processes going on which influences art projects. Political memes spring to mind.

    With respect to researching stuff it can help with forming concepts and with building a bigger picture of historical and political events and philosophical thoughts etc.

    I'm sure it could be a benefit for your artistic concept work if you were interested in a more granular level of understanding of how you got to a particular point. It would all depend on what associations you choose to include. For example you could flag artists and schools of art etc. to see where you maybe subconsciously drawing inspiration from. Or maybe seeing links based on mythology or historical time periods could give you some insight that may not be obvious at first glance?

    On one level mind maps tend to be very personal, while at the same time they can also be used to help explain things to others in a way that allows them to visualise a concept etc. they may even spot something that never even occurred to you in the process.

    The biggest problem for me is being disciplined enough to keep putting the data in. I often read something in some random place and make a mental note to add it to something I have ongoing. The problem is the mental notes often don't get followed up consistently. Information in physical books is my weakest point because I'm often too lazy to type the information in. I always regret it latter on when the information becomes relevant and then I struggle to remember where I got the information or thought from. My phone has a jumbled mess of picture of pages from books that I need to transfer and organise but I never actually seem to get around to that chore.

    I used to use a portable app called KeepNote available here https://portableapps.com/apps/office/keepnote-portable but I have been a bit of a slacker with it of late. I still have it on my pen drive with some old projects that I should go back to at some point. It's not a mind map but it's handy to collect random bits of information while poking about on the web etc. (it's a bit clunky and old school and better on Linux iirc). I have also been playing with the Synology Note Station app which does a similar job to KeepNote, and you can sync it up with your phone which makes it much easier to stay consistent (in theory at least :) ). More info here https://www.synology.com/en-us/dsm/feature/note_station the problem with that solution is you need a Synology NAS device.

    This thread may encourage me to up my game and be more consistent in the future?
     
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  7. Marty

    Marty Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Interesting, if I could hone in on this point a bit. Those unexpected connections are second-order (and higher) connections right? Since the first-order links are created by you directly.

    So in essence, the power of mindmap lies in visualizing the peripheral connections that would not be immediately obvious examining each concept alone. Sort of like an interactive version of the iconic "police cork board" map:

    [​IMG]

    This might take some time to wrap my head around, as I've found my brain just tends to see a jumbled mass when looking at a complex mind map.

    Do you know if there The Brain allows inking? I've found the simple act of writing something by hand rather than just typing it, helps recall. Inked notes might help you in your situation.
     
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  8. Shizaru

    Shizaru Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Yes that's the sort of thing you can do but you need to create the points that you want to correlate and then the system makes the links. That's one way of using it but you can use it for something as simple as planning a party. The links could be people and locations so you would know where people are coming from and could maybe share a ride or something.

    If you're looking at some suspicious activity between governments and corporations you can look for people, members of government and their past employment records, and other associations between corporation employees etc. Revolving door maneuvers become blatantly obvious for example.

    Novelists use it to build a story and maintain continuity of characters and their rolls and relationships in plots etc. This helps them avoid referring to the wrong charters or events and provides prompts for character development etc.

    In the pro version of The Brain you can create links to items on the web (or local application) and show content in a pain either to the side or below the main map.

    You can try it free for 30 Days https://www.thebrain.com/store the free version is listed at the bottom of the page. After 30 days you can keep using it for free but you lose some cool features.









     
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