Microsoft Surface tablet (Windows 8, Core i5 IvyBridge)

Discussion in 'Microsoft' started by hp79, Jun 18, 2012.

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  1. hp79

    hp79 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Microsoft announced a tablet of their own.

    surface.com

    Presentation (thanks to user 'bkydcmpr')
    Windows Newsroom
    Download mp4 presentation file
    In the video, I really like how they emphasis on build quality. The lines and the perfect sound of how the kick stand opens, the glass that is bonded with the screen to reduce distance from the pen and screen, air vent lines all around the body sounds super attractive.


    Surface for Windows 8 Pro tablet
    Processor: Intel Core i5 (Ivy Bridge)
    Weight: 903 grams (1.99 lbs)
    Thickness: 13.5 millimeters (0.53 inch)
    Display: 10.6-inch ClearType Full HD (1920 x 1080) capactive touchpanel
    Battery: 42Wh
    I/O: microSDXC, USB 3.0, Mini DisplayPort, 2x2 MIMO antennae
    Software: Windows 8 Pro
    Accessories: Touch Cover, Type Cover, VaporMg Case & Stand, Pen with Palm Block
    Capacity: 64GB / 128GB
    Availability: "Three months after" the Windows 8 launch this fall



    My previous tablets---
    X61T: Good for its time. Good build quality, accurate pen.
    X220T: Bulky and ugly battery, problem writing on the edge of screen. Good thermals.
    Series 7 Slate: Build quality sucks - screen separation, backlight problems. Super light, accurate pen.

    I hope this one sets an example to all other Windows 7 PC manufacturers of how they should build a tablet properly.
     

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 18, 2015
  2. GreenStorm

    GreenStorm Pen Pal - Newbie

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    The most interesting thing would be the battery-life then. i5 with around 40Wh isn't that much. The active digitizer is also a great thing. And the fact that is is a fully usable PC, meaning I could install something else on there as well.
     
  3. hp79

    hp79 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I agree, 40 Wh isn't much. That's the same size that Samsung Series 7 Slate (i5 SandyBridge) has. I know from experience, I get about 3:30 when using it during meetings with Teamviewer sharing my screen. That's about 11.43 W/hour rate. Since IvyBridge will use less power, if we assume it uses about 10 W/hour during meetings and presentations, that'll give 4 hours. Reading PDF and mostly idle usually drains the battery at about 7W/h, which makes it about 5:40 minutes. So I'm guessing Surface will get us at least 4 hours of internet surfing which is not bad but not that good either. We'll see.
     
  4. taoyue

    taoyue HP Elitebook 2740p

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    I wonder if you might be able to get more mileage out of it if you stick with Metro applications. WinRT is designed to keep the processor in low-power states, so far as is feasible. And if you never launch a desktop app, then there are a lot of system processes and services that also don't spin up.

    If you're only reading PDFs and not marking up, then you should be able to get by with the built-in PDF reader. (And if you're marking up with a stylus, then you're taking the power hit for the active digitizer anyway.)

    The trouble is, as soon as you load one desktop app, the Windows desktop environment will remain running. It's unclear how much this scenario has been optimized.
     
  5. 123Fels

    123Fels Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Hey, i decided to look deeper into the expectable battery life of the Microsoft Surface Pro and i think that your comparison with the Samsung Series 7 Slate ist really adequate. So these are the main differences i found between the two tablets only taking into account things important for battery life (normally display+cpu+gpu+wlan+digitizers together consume more than 90% of the power of our professional tablets of this kind) :

    Microsoft Surface Pro vs. Samsung Series 7 Slate
    - 42Wh battery (that should be 7,2V 5800mah) vs. 5520mah battery => so 6% larger battery.
    (http://www.microsoft.com/global/surface/en/us/renderingassets/surfacespecsheet.pdf)
    - Platform: Ivy bridge vs sandy bridge. Improvement from what i read now. i can't quantify => lets assume + 5%
    Ivy Bridge – TDP Rating, Power Consumption | Compare Processors
    - 10,6" vs. 11,6" display. using the Pythagoras we can calculate that the 16/9 screens have 310cm2 vs. 370cm2 screen. So 16% less screen. But it's a 1080p vs. 720p Display - hence more power used by system but also the display itself. So that 16% must discounted to maybe 12%. Further from my experience the screen in such ULV systems uses roughly 30%-60% of overall power depending of cpu-load. => So all in all at least roughly 5% battery life improvement from screen.
    - Assuming Wacom technology the smaller digitizer should equalize more touchpoints (n-trig would use less power, but Microsoft was touting quality so i assume the wacom) =>+-0%


    There are a lot of proportionality assumptions inside the calculation, but the calculation says we can expect a little more than 10% maybe 15% longer battery life with the Surface Pro vs. the Samsung Series 7 Slate…. Haha… Hopefully the improvement that windows 8 with its metro, hardware acceleration, better service management etc. brings, at least equalizes the shifting user scenarios. I would expect 5 hours real world battery life for the Surface Pro and 7 hours with the Surface RT.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2012
  6. acerbic

    acerbic Scribbler - Standard Member

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    The videos show a working eraser on the pen, so it looks like Wacom. N-Trig in the RT version would be better than nothing, but I guess a pen would make it less "tablet sexy".
     
  7. 123Fels

    123Fels Pen Pal - Newbie

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  8. valdarsh

    valdarsh Pen Pal - Newbie

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    The patent sounds interesting, but the thousand dollar question for me is. . .what sort of pressure sensitivity does it have?

    Closer to screen = good though.
     
  9. dstrauss

    dstrauss Comic Relief Senior Member

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    Looking at the patent application and the picture of the actual pen, it looks like a nib sticking out of the end of the pen, not an integrated point with the barrel - a lot like my Samsung Series 7 Slate pen witht eh optional white nib I'm using.
     
  10. Tams

    Tams Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    "And, when I'm done with the pen, you could see the little magnetic charging connector there, the pen just clicks in. So that's one of the cool things on Surface for Windows 8 Pro in inking. " The ePen charger is noted above while the ePen magnetically resting on it is shown below."

    I'd prefer a silo, but I guess that wouldn't fit in with the design. Anyway, if it's going to require charging, even if it is easy, then it will have to be significantly better than Wacom's technology in order for me to buy it. The 'ink' being closer to the glass on it's own doesn't cut it for me.

    "Another thing that's going on here is, as I'm moving my hand [on the tablet], you see that the page is not moving underneath my hand. That's because Windows has "Palm Block" technology. This surface has two digitizers. It has one for touch and a separate one for digital ink. And what happens is that when I bring the pen close to the screen, Windows sees the proximity of the pen and stops taking touch input so that my hand doesn't mess up what I'm writing."

    What's really going to get my goat is technology 'reporters' heralding this as new and revolutionary. A new implementation, but not really new.
     
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