Microsoft OneNote | Some Basic Questions

Discussion in 'OneNote, Evernote and Organizers' started by jaekqubp, Sep 5, 2014.

  1. jaekqubp

    jaekqubp Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Hi everybody,

    I've recently began using OneNote for note-taking. I have a few seemingly basic questions, that I've seen addressed elsewhere, though I haven't found a suitable answer.

    1. How do I set a default paper?
    I know how to change a paper selection in OneNote, by using the finger-gesture or right click, and selecting "Paper", however I would look to set a default paper style -- specifically, grid, and not have to change it everytime. Is this a shortcoming of OneNote, or is there something that I'm missing.

    2. How do I create backups of my OneNote pages?
    I have found the backup directories for OneNote in the directory [C:\Users\MyUserName\AppData\Local\Microsoft\OneNote], however the backup dates, and backup information seems to be arbitrary in terms of the files dates and the information that has been backed up. Additionally, it's unclear how this data can be re-imported. I would like to force a backup, either through OneNote or a third party application. Exporting to another format such as PDF may be a consideration as well. By the way, I don't entirely trust cloud storage for important data.

    3. How can I disable the stylus cursor in Metro?
    In Windows proper, there are options to disable visual feedback, such as the cursor for the stylus, however I haven't figured out how this can be accomplished in the Metro UI, or more specifically, in OneNote. The little circle cursor kind of throws me off.

    Any responses are appreciated.

    Thanks in advance.
    3.
     
  2. dbrn

    dbrn Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Hi jaek. I can help with your #1 but you won't love the answer. If you're using 2010 or 2013, go to the VIEW tab, then click the dropdown next to 'Rule Lines'. The bottom item is "Always Create pages with Rule Lines," which you can tick to change the default paper. But I don't know of any way to make grid paper the default, sorry.
     
  3. jaekqubp

    jaekqubp Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Hi dbrn,

    Thanks for your response. I'm actually using the Metro version from the Store, however, I have the Office 2010, as well.
    It seems that the version from the Office suite may have more features -- I will look into it.

    Thanks again.

     
  4. dbrn

    dbrn Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Whoops, duh, yeah you did say Metro, didn't you :p . Oh well, good luck.
     
  5. jhoff80

    jhoff80 Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Many, many more features.
     
  6. Bronsky

    Bronsky Wait and Hope. Senior Member

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    I haven't used metro onenote for months and I must say that it is vastly improved.
     
  7. Mesosphere

    Mesosphere Geek. Senior Member

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    Doesn't address the OP, but in case you didn't know Desktop OneNote is now free. Your comment about having office 2010, indicated you might not be aware of this.
     
  8. jaekqubp

    jaekqubp Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Hi everybody,

    Thanks for your helpful and informative responses. Yes, I am currently using the Metro/RT version of OneNote, and I was not aware that the current full version of OneNote is free. As I am using a Surface Pro first edition, which has notoriously poor battery life, I do what I can to conserve power consumption. By my observation, the Metro UI based "apps" seem to draw less power than their Desktop counterparts. However, if the usefulness of the feature-set of the full version outweighs the power saving of the Metro version, I would make a switch.

    Additionally, I own a perpetually licensed copy of the Office 2010 Professional suite, which has suited my needs sufficiently. However, I am authorized a license for up to five copies of the Office 365 Pro Plus suite for free, from my school, which I have considered.
    Are there any specific advantages of the 365 version over the 2010 version of Office that make it worthwhile to upgrade. In general, I would rather use software that I own indefinitely. This may be a question better addressed in another forum thread, but I figured I would throw it out there.

    Thanks again for all of the valuable input.

     
  9. tijo

    tijo Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    If you are a heavy Word user, Word 2013 has several small improvements that will make formatting documents with images, figures, etc. that much easier. If you do a lot of plots, graphs, charts, etc. in Excel, do yourself a favor and get 2013, editing graphics is seriously improved and I mean seriously. The new UI for it is going to save you a lot of time. Powerpoint 2013 also has some improvments that help the placement of multiple images and such on slides as well. It's not the next big leap, but there are quite a few small improvements that really make your life easier.
     
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