Microsoft Design Article From Yahoo / Bing

Discussion in 'Microsoft' started by Steve S, Jul 22, 2014.

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  1. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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  2. gcoupe

    gcoupe Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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  3. dstrauss

    dstrauss Comic Relief Senior Member

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    A very interesting read - I just hope "Ive envy" doesn't pollute the openness and user configurability of the Windows environment. I also hope this extends to MS Office design as well. I have always thought that the OS itself should ultimately disappear and the software controls your environment - in other words think of my SPro 3 being run ON Office instead of running office. The best description I can give of this goes back a very long way to WordPerfect 5.1 for Windows (my first real beta tester experience). The file manager baked into WP 5.1W far outperformed Windows File Explorer, and many users never left WP 5.1 to do file maintenance duties - just do it in the built in file manager.

    THAT's where the designers need to take the interface.
     
  4. Osiris

    Osiris Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Yes an interesting read and the trend to get designers in early or use designers to imagine what can be and leave the engineers to make it a reality is a powerful process but like anything it requires balance.

    I think a powerful design ethos permeated Microsoft with the advent of Metro and leading up to Windows 8, the pride in craftsmanship, one Microsoft, digitally authentic, beautiful typography etc are all great values to aspire to and be guided by but in the case of Windows 8 when the lead designer talks about some of the depths they went to, to achieve that eg redoing the BSOD, removing an onscreen flash as the system goes from loading to login, ensuring when you swipe on the start page it all lines up (originally) all took a lot of time and resources to achieve and when you contrast that with some of the features (rather options) missing from vanilla windows 8, it paints a picture of imbalance between design vs usability vs what consumers care about.

    I'm not saying they shouldn't have done those things im just saying its not without its risks, either way an interesting article (thanks for posting) and even more interesting times ahead for MS and consumers imo.
     
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