Maximize Your Battery's Life

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Steve S, Aug 26, 2017.

  1. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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    Popular Science (the world's best magazine) has a nice take on how you can maximize the life of your Li-Ion batterys. In general, I agree with their recommendations:

    http://www.popsci.com/charge-batter...pJobID=1103077465&spReportId=MTEwMzA3NzQ2NQS2

    The information at Battery University is getting a little dated at this point, but it's still one of the best reference sites that I know of for Li-Ion battery information and aging trends.
     
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  2. thierryb

    thierryb Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I apply only two advices :
    never go below 20 %.
    Never let a device a long time too empty or too full
     
  3. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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    thatcomicsguy and Druid like this.
  4. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I was pondering...

    According the the Lithium Ion battery experts over on Quora, fast charging degrades battery chemistry faster than trickle charging. -But how the heck do you trickle charge a laptop when it takes care of the all its own electronics?

    Maybe it would be smart to get a USB-C charger of some kind because they only output 5V. -The new Samsung Notebook 9 Pro I picked up last month comes packaged with a fast charger; it can go from 30% battery life to full in less than two hours.

    Thing is... I don't know much about USB-C charging and how that all works. Presumably the laptop manufacturer will have built in whatever electronics are necessary to mediate incoming power appropriately for their battery chemistry.


    EDIT~~~~~~~~~~~

    Nevermind.

    This is obviously a silly thing to worry about. I'm sure a modern company like Samsung knows how to build a charging circuit which is far smarter than me and anything I try to do will just screw things up.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2017
  5. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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    <...According the...Lithium Ion battery experts...>>

    A few comments: <<...fast charging degrades battery chemistry faster than trickle charging...>>

    That is correct, but like any other technical device, batteries can be specifically designed to withstand many of the rigors of "fast" charging. Hobby Li-Ion and Li-Polymer can be charged at multiples of the native discharge rate (called "C") for many cycles before the batteries exhibit significant signs of wear. The best chargers monitor the battery pack temperature and the individual cells (cell balancing) for both safety and charging performance. Charging at the native discharge rate, 1C, is actually pretty benign. Considering that many tablets and laptops operate at about 3-4 A, and that the companion AC adapters are rated at about the same current level, your tablet batteries are being treated fairly gently.

    <<...how the heck do you trickle charge a laptop when it takes care of...all its own electronics?..>>

    Obviously, you don't. But guess what? Many (maybe most) on-board battery management circuits on tablets and laptops provide this sort of functionality.

    <<...Maybe it would be smart to get a USB-C charger of some kind because they only output 5V...>>

    It's not about the voltage (unless the voltage level is wildly out of wack), it's about the current. Most battery management circuits will limit the input current to levels that the battery pack can safely accept. So you're just wasting money on that 100 A USB-C charger that you've got your eye on! Note, however, that it's possible to have too little current to charge at an optimal rate...

    <<...Presumably the laptop manufacturer will have built in whatever electronics are necessary to mediate incoming power appropriately for their battery chemistry...>>

    Ah; insight! You are correct. A competent OEM will have designed their battery - battery management system with components that are matched for the performance of the overall tablet or laptop. If that system provides for accelerated charging, the OEM should have selected a Li-ion (or -poly) battery pack with an appropriate tolerance for the increased charging current...
     

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