Looking for a cheap sketching machine

Discussion in 'What Tablet PC Should I Buy?' started by zendragon, Feb 16, 2019.

  1. zendragon

    zendragon Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I am looking for a smaller sketching device for pretty much just sketching. I don't want to spend a lot, and I prefer a 3:2 or 4:3 aspect ratio.

    I have been looking at the Galaxy S3, but I saw on another thread someone said the 6th Gen iPad works with the Apple Pencil, and is only $249 on Amazon right now. That's about half the price of the S3, and while I'd have to buy the Pencil, it'd still be cheaper.

    But I have never liked IOS and know next to nothing about it. So, can anyone compare these two for me? What's the pressure sensitivity like on the Apple Pencil? And does it have tilt like the Samsung?

    One other thing of note. I use Clip Studio on my main machine, which was another selling point for the iPad, but how does it handle on the non-Pro version?

    Sorry I didn't fill out the form, but I figure most of that info isn't really relevant to this question.

    Thanks for the help!
     
  2. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    If you buy an Android device for drawing here is what will happen...

    You will spend your hard earned cash, eagerly await the arrival of your New Shiny, open it up while feeling joy glow from your heart, mess around with the new device for a while, and brush away the idea slowly dawning on you that the pen is a lie and that there's no way you're really ever going to be able to make true creative use of this incredibly user-unfriendly device. -One requires the use of frustrating, buggy third party 'apps' just to fight the drawing you just made onto your real computer.

    You'll then try out a few (bad) art apps, and slowly come to realize that drawing on a super-slippery piece of glass the size of dinner napkin is kind of awkward and stressful because your hand keeps setting off screen functions like so many digital mousetraps. You will at some point during this process lament the fact that the stylus button has been rendered useless, able only to open up post-it notes and other inane functions designed for people who don't actually like to draw.

    And finally... you will never use it again as an art creation device. Because Android sucks.

    The end.

    (Addendum: I hear from users who have used both that iOS manages to be even worse.)

    These devices are used to addict people on games, TV and insipid social media. They are specifically, and I believe deliberately broken for people who want to actually create things. You need a real computer to create things. Get a real computer.

    (Please be advised that I am feeling crotchety this evening and that my words above should be taken with about a half shaker of salt.)
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2019
  3. zendragon

    zendragon Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Don't worry about the response, I get it. I've had an android in the past for sketching (HTC Flyer). It had its issues, but I got along ok for quick sketches. You're right about trying to move my artwork to my pc, not easy then. I was hoping things would be better by now. It was also terribly slow and laggy, another thing I was hoping the newer devices would do better on.

    I also already have a Tablet PC for drawing on. It works great with Clip Studio Paint, but it's a little bigger than I want for just an on the go sketchbook. I would prefer 10 inches or smaller, and in those dimensions, Windows options are severely limited. Galaxy Book 10 and Surface Go from what I can tell. Both are limited to the 2008 standard of 4gb ram. New cell phones have more than that, and I already feel occasional lag with my 8gb machine. I know the Android and IOS devices have less ram, but I assumed their OSes used less off the top and the programs were in general a little lighter, so functionally I wouldn't see much difference.

    IDK, maybe the Surface Go or GB10 is the right way to go, but I'm just not sold on the power behind them.
     
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  4. zendragon

    zendragon Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Ok, so I retract my earlier statement, I see there's now an 8gb ram version of the Go. So, for around $560 I can get an 8gb Go with Pen. Still a couple hundred more than I would spend on the reduced price iPad and Apple Pencil.
     
  5. Azzart

    Azzart Late night illustrator Senior Member

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    If you just want to sketch get an iPad with Pencil and Procreate, trust me.
    You'll save yourself plenty of headaches.
    The Surface Go may have 8gb of ram, but it lacks a decent pen and the cpu power is even worse than the Core M3, which I would mark the bare minimum for drawing just decently in Windows.
     
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  6. zendragon

    zendragon Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Ok, so sell me on the iPad and Apple Pencil. I looked in the Apple forum, but most threads talk about the Pro version.

    Anyone have some real world experience they can share with sketching on the regular iPad?
     
  7. Azzart

    Azzart Late night illustrator Senior Member

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    What do you need to know? It's just like using the first gen 9.7" iPad Pro: if you can cope with the 2gb of ram which gives a lot less layers available in apps like Procreate (if memory serves me well something like 12 layers on an A4 at 300dpi file), then it will be fine.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2019
  8. zendragon

    zendragon Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I've never used anything IOS related. How does the pen compare to Wacom EMR or AES?

    12 layers is the max in Procreate? Doubt I would use that many, but I guess it's possible. But how easy is it to transfer my line art over to my PC if I want to finish out a sketch?

    What's the lag going to be like at 300dpi?

    And I guess, really what I'm looking for is, functionally, how natural will it be to just pick it up and start sketching? And how would that compare to the Galaxy S3?

    I want to be able to take this anywhere, pull it out, and start sketching as if it were paper without much fuss. And I want to be able to transfer any sketches I want to finish to my PC and Clip Studio with relative ease.

    I doubt I will use it for anything other than that. Maybe some web browsing, but not much else. I don't like IOS, but, for as cheap as they are right now, if it compares well enough to the Wacom EMR of the S3, I'm probably willing to get over it, but I've just not seen any real reviews or real world examples yet.
     
  9. Azzart

    Azzart Late night illustrator Senior Member

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    You'll get discording opinions here about that. Plastic on glass aside, for me is perfectly on par with wacom emr. Better if we consider the use of tilt.

    The simplest way is to use a cloud service.
    Or you could export them from the app and import them to the pc with iTunes.
    Personally I used ant o use an app called Documents to manage files and I simply used to send them through wifi with it.

    What's lag? There is no such thing in a controlled environment like Procreate and the likes.
    That's the reason why you have size and layer limits on files.

    Forget what you're used to with a pc, it's like having a sketchbook and a pencil: always ready.
    Unless you forget to charge the Pencil or to turn it off in case you're lugging it around all day. If you do so the pen will be always on and you may find it need some minutes of charge because it's low on battery.
    Basically, it turns it off only when it lays still for some minutes when paired.

    I don't have experience with the Tab S family so I can't judge. My experience on android is only with the Galaxy Note 8 phone and Infinite Painter: it's a good app, best drawing app I could find on android, but nowhere near the refinement of any art ap p for iOS.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2019
  10. Marty

    Marty Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I'd just like to chime in here to say the my experience with drawing on Android has been quite pleasant, to my own surprise.

    I've actually found the process of porting my workflow to mobile not nearly as hard as I imagined. For example, ArtFlow offers a close match to my ClipStudio Paint portrait layout (and can be combine with a floating media player for reference images):

    [​IMG]

    The UI can be set to auto-hide to maximize screen real-estate for immersive sketching.

    It also features full layer adjustments and blend modes:

    [​IMG]

    and the brush engine is surprisingly robust, with features like per brush pressure curve adjustment:

    [​IMG]

    The app can even export to PSD for opening up in CSP, if you want to continue working on a tablet/desktop PC:

    [​IMG]

    So all-in-all, I would say if you're looking for a light, affordable sketching tablet, a Galaxy Tab S3/S4 could be a great choice! :thumbsup:
     
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