List of Programs for the Artist

Discussion in 'Software' started by Ice, Dec 4, 2010.

  1. Ice

    Ice Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Drawing/Painting
    Photoshop CS6: Photoshop CS6
    Price: $700 ($200 for Students)
    Type: Image Editing

    Photoshop is the standard program for image editing and painting. Although its mainly directed for editing, its brushes are very customizable and it is a very flexible program for you to use. There are also stripped-down, cheaper versions of Photoshop, known as Elements, that come with only a few features.

    Plugins:MagicPicker ($14) and Coolorus (Beta) (requires internet)
    As someone who started out with software that had dedicated color wheels, I was rather disgruntled when I got Photoshop. These two plugins give you color wheels. Coolorus works very nicely - along with normal color wheel functions, it lets you set your color wheel to complementary colors and the like.
    MagicPicker is another a color wheel - the full version is $14. I am using the old version, but supposedly the new version is faster. I have only had trouble with it in Photoshop CS3 - it works fine in CS5; supposedly there have been changes as to how it works in CS3 since I tried. It works from CS3-CS6.​



    Corel Painter 13:Corel Painter X3
    Price: $400 (students can find it for as low as $80)
    Type: Digital Painting

    The leader in natural media emulation, Corel Painter offers many different realistic media types, such as Oil Paints, Pastels, Pencils, and Pens. It has customizable brushes. Corel Painter Essentials is the stripped-down version of this, and offers only a few brushes. Furthermore, although it is not impossible to add new brushes to the Essentials versions, it is difficult and sometimes does not work well because Corel did not intend for people to add brushes.

    Somewhat of a resource hog.​

    GIMP:GIMP - The GNU Image Manipulation Program
    Price: FREE
    Type: Image Editing
    Platform: Linux/Windows
    Video: YouTube - How to Draw A Realistic Eye with Gimp TUTORIAL

    Gimp is an open-source image editor with many features like Photoshop's. It's very versatile, having customizable brushes, and has the perk of being free.

    GIMP Paint Studio: GPS at Google Code
    If you want to use GIMP for painting, make sure to download this wonderful brush/brush preset pack. GPS 2.0 is for GIMP 2.8. The manual is in Spanish, but adding the pack is a straightforward affair.

    UPDATE 07-28-12: Gimp 2.8 was released recently. It brings the ability to tag brush presets and has more options for customizing brushes. However, it seems to pressure sensitivity seems to be broken on some tablets. When Gimp 2.8 is initially installed, your tablet isn't enabled, so go to Edit-->Input Devices, and changed your tablet's pen/eraser from 'Disabled' to 'Screen'.



    Krita:Krita
    Price: FREE
    Type: Digital Painting
    Platforms: Linux/Windows

    Krita is currently has a stable release. It is becoming a very nice little program. One thing of note is its ridiculously configurable brushes (each brush can have its own pressure curve!). It is nicer than Gimp for drawing/painting, since it was designed with that in mind, unlike Gimp (which seems to be image editing-oriented). Give it a spin if you can.

    If you've used Alchemy before, you'd be pleased to note that Krita has some familiar brushes and the ability to enable horizontal/vertical symmetry.

    It works without any problems on the two tablets I've tried. There are several different versions of it - one tablet-device oriented, one for desktops.​

    Mypaint:MyPaint
    Price:FREE
    Type: Digital Painting
    Platforms: Linux/Windows
    Video: YouTube - Kristen Stewart. portrait in MyPaint (timelapse)

    Mypaint is a very simple drawing and sketching program. It has a fairly spartan interface compared to other programs, but has layer support and customizable brushes. I don't know if it works properly in Tablet PC's, but if it does, it will be excellent for sketching - the interface is filled with the bare minimum, leaving you with a clean canvas.

    This program is more suited for sketching because it has an unlimited canvas. You can't set canvas size - the canvas just stretches out endlessly, making it great fun for sketching. This is my favorite program for doodling because of the canvas - I just continue panning/zooming out as needed.

    The Linux versions of Mypaint are further along, and have new symmetry features and some other tools (line tools and the like, I think). There's an unofficial 1.1 out there for Windows that may work for some people.

    Brush Packs: There are several brush packs available on the Mypaint Wiki. Most are already included in Mypaint 1.0 - I just recommend you add the Concept and Design pack.

    Mischief:MadewithMischief
    Price:$129
    Type: Digital Painting/Vector
    Platforms: Windows/Mac

    This is an interesting vector/digital painting software. Functions just like a spartan drawing software (most akin to Mypaint, actually - infinite canvas) except that it uses vectors, so you can zoom in/out/pan nearly infinitely and and the files are exceptionally small. It's a very young software - still on the 1.02 release, and a bit pricy for the feature set, but I suspect concept artists may find it useful. It might be worth a look at in a version or two.

    Do try the trial before you buy it - while it runs a bit buggily on my desktop, it refuses to run at all on my Surface. It seems there is a Surface Pro version around the corner....

    Autodesk Sketchbook Pro:SketchBook Pro
    Price: $70 (FREE for students)
    Type: Digital Painting
    Video: YouTube - Eagle Speed Painting using Sketchbook Pro and Wacom Tablet

    Sketchbook Pro has an interface that's made for tablet PCs. It has less options than big image editors, but is intuitive and has layers, customizable brushes, etc. This seems to be one of the best-suited programs for tablet PCs. You don't have to fiddle with any drivers to get it to run - it'll work like a charm right out of the box.​

    Paint Tool Sai: Easy Paint Tool Sai
    Price: Around $60
    Type: Digital Painting

    A popular software targeted to anime/comic art. Of note are its incredible speed and lightweight-ness - even on the most ancient of hardware, you'll likely have snappy performance. Has fairly nice brush and pen tools, but is rather limited on the editing side of things. Personally, this is my favorite software for smooth linework or simple (flat) coloring.

    I have found it to be finicky with tablet drivers in the past, which is unsurprising, considering it came out in 2008. Shockingly, this software isn't dead - the 1.2 version came out recently, and the 2.0 version is in the works, bringing what looks to be some perspective tools with it, among other things.


    Opencanvas: openCanvas4.5+,PGN CommunitySite or openCanvas 1.1 - English version
    Price: 6800 Yen or FREE
    Type: Digital Painting/Networking
    Video: YouTube - Wolf - Digital Drawing in OpenCanvas

    This program was pretty popular for digital art, but I believe the support for the English version was discontinued recently. The second link I have is for the early, freeware version of this. It's pretty simple - no custom brushes, just a few that are pre-brought. It has support for a few layers.

    The most interesting part of the freeware version is Networking. It is a feature that - by using the IP address of someone else who has this program - allows you to draw online on a digital canvas! It's incredibly fun if you have a friend with a tablet PC or external tablet, but can be fairly difficult to set up - you'll have to be pretty tech savvy and know your way around routers to fix it if it doesn't work for you straight away.

    In networking mode, each person gets their own layers. Although how synchronized your canvas's are depends on your internet speed, I've found it tends to be fairly quick. This program also allows you to save 'Event Files' which allow you to view your whole drawing process.​

    Artweaver:Home
    Price: 29 Euro or FREE
    Type: Digital Painting
    Video: YouTube - Car SpeedPainting ArtWeaver [HD]

    Artweaver is another traditional media emulation program. It isn't as full featured as Corel Painter, but it might be nice to try.​

    ArtRage: Artrage Home
    $80, $40, or $20
    Type: Digital Painting/Natural Media Emulation
    Video: YouTube - Angelina-ArtRage

    Yet another digital media emulation program. This one is not as robust as painter - if anything, it's somewhat like a clone - but is more powerful than Artweaver. It has a clean, nice-looking interface, so it might work well with tablets. Having tried the trial for a few days, I can't provide much feedback, but you might want to get a trial and try it out. Its 2.6 version is only $20, making it very affordable.​

    Project Dogwaffle: Project Dogwaffle 1.2
    Price: $?? and FREE
    Type: Digital Painting
    Video: YouTube - digital painting with freeware edition of dogwaffle

    I have not tried this program, and I do not particularly like how it looks from videos, but it seems to be a passable digital painting program with many brushes. There appears to be a freeware and a paid version.​

    Twistedbrush:Pixarra : TwistedBrush Digital Painting and Photo Editing
    Price: $100 or FREE
    Type: Digital Painting​

    Pixia:introducing Pixia & Phierha
    Price:FREE
    Type: Digital painting/ anime art

    It seems to be a small, limited application intended mainly for manga art.​

    Mangastudio 5/Clip Paint Studio/Illustudio:Manga Studio Debut Software - Anyone Can Create Manga and Comic Art
    Price: $79
    Type:Manga/comic art

    This program is primarily intended for manga/comic artists, and so has features that are useful for them, such as different pens, screentones, templates, speed lines, etc.

    The latest version, Manga Studio 5, is a direct translation of the excellent Clip Paint Studio. It feels like a mash-up of Sai and Photoshop, with 3D modeling capabilities and many comic-oriented features. If you want to give it a whirl, you might have to wait for a while - there's no trial version out yet.

    NEW! SpeedyPainter:SpeedyPainter - a lightweight OpenGL painting application
    Price: FREE
    Type:Sketching

    A very nice little program - it looks a little like Sculptris, if you've used it. It has layers and a simple selection of brushes (couple of shapes, textures, etc).

    Features of note: It allows you to record and export your drawing process. It has a 'reference view' specifically tailored for drawing from a picture: it displays your canvas and reference side by side and pans/zooms simultaneously on both. It also has a perspective grid overlay.

    NEW! Black Ink:BLACK INK
    Price: 34,99 €
    Type: Digital Painting

    A very young software, focused on brush creation, it seems? Will update when I download the trial or find some information on it.


    FireAlpaca:Simple and Easy - Fire Alpaca
    Price: FREE
    Type: Digital Painting
    Platform: Windows/OS X

    Seems to be another simple little program - still need to check it out.


    UPDATE! MangoLabo:MangaLabo
    Price: Free limited trial or $72.50 for full version
    Type:Manga/comic art

    This program has a lot of useful features for comic/manga artists, namely a guideline system, Deleter tones, etc. The GUI is a tad outdated, but it is very functional.

    There's a 64-bit version now in Japanese.​

    Vector Software

    Adobe Illustrator:graphic design software | Adobe Illustrator CS5
    Price:$60
    Type:Vector

    Illustrator is super stable and with CS5 brought about pressure sensitive brushes. These can be fiddly to activate but they are good.

    Finally - you can copy and paste journal linework (thanks to Shogmaster for that) into Illustrator. Trying the same in any other vector application produces a jpeg bitmap. I use journal a lot and can copy and paste beautiful black linework into Illustrator. Inkscape cleans the lines up and removes extraneous control points.​

    Inkscape:Inkscape. Draw Freely.
    Price: Free
    Type: Vector editing
    Video: YouTube - Ferrari F458 - Speed Drawing HD

    A robust, free vector editing program.

    Inkscape does quite a few things that Illustrator cannot - or that many other vector tools won't and some of the path handling functions are really powerful. That said - Inkscape can crash if it is asked to handle large files.​

    Karbon:Karbon
    Price: Free
    Type: Vector editing
    Platform: Linux

    A vector software for Linux. Regretfully, I know little about it.​

    Sketchbook Pro Designer:SketchBook Designer - Concept Design and Illustration Software - Autodesk
    Price: $500 or FREE
    Type:Raster/vector editing hybrid.

    This appears to have a minimalist interface similar to Sketchbook Pro, but it has vector editing tools as well as the standard tools. It is available for free for students.​

    Alchemy: Alchemy | An open drawing project
    Price: FREE
    Type: Other (sketching/free drawing)
    Video: YouTube - Alchemy - 5 minutes drawing session

    Alchemy is directed more for creative, spontaneous drawing, and I can't say I've used it much. I would suggest you look for a video or read about it - compared to other programs, it's rather hard to explain how it works. Again, it is mostly for doodling and beginning drawings - it doesn't have the features of a typical painting program, like layers and brushes.​

    NEW Webchemy: Webchemy: An open drawing project
    Price: FREE
    Type: Other (sketching/free drawing)
    Platform: Cross/Web-app

    Essentially a stripped down version of Alchemy, in webapp form. Useful for busting out thumbnails or sketches.​

    2D Animation

    Adobe Flash Professional: animation software, multimedia software | Adobe Flash Professional CS5
    Price: $600
    Type: Flash animation

    Adobe's flash animation program is quite popular, and it can be used for drawing as well as animation (although it is primarily intended for the former).​

    Vectorian Giottol: Vectorian - Flash Animation Tools
    Price: FREE
    Type: Flash animation

    Vectorian Giotto is basically the free version of Flash - the interface and functions are so similar. It even does scripting.​

    Plastic Animation Paper: Plastic Animation Paper - PAP:pro 4.0 for free
    Price: FREE
    Type: Traditional 2D animation

    Recently, the full version of this program was released for free. It's made mostly for concept animations, and you have to draw each frame of the animation by yourself. It has the fairly standard features, such as onionskinning (which shows the previous and next frames at the same time as the current one).

    Purportedly rather complicated.​

    Pencil:Pencil - a traditional 2D animation software
    Price: FREE
    Type: Traditional 2D animation

    Another traditional animation program, meaning all frames are drawn manually. This one also allows you to color your frames.

    Good for roughs, troublesome on anything bigger/longer/more complicated.​

    Synfig Studio:Welcome to Synfig - powerful vector-based open-source 2D animation
    Price: FREE
    Type: 2D animation

    Although it's a fairly traditional 2D animation program, you don't have to draw out each and every frame.​

    3D Modeling
    Sculptris: Sculptris
    Price: FREE
    Type: 3D Modeling/Sculpting
    Video: YouTube - Head modelling in Sculptris

    This is one of the few free 3D modeling programs out there. It is also one of the simplest and intuitive ones. Sculptures are incredibly easy to make in this program - there are several simple tools, such as Pinch, Inflate, Crease, Grab, etc. It has a streamlined interface that I believe is reminiscent of Zbrush. Although I am not well versed in 3d programs, I believe it's main attraction is the fact that it can add detail to the 'mesh' itself. You do not have to subdivide the polygons of your sculpture to get more detail - it does so automatically.

    A word of warning - no matter how good your specs are, if you perform too intensive an action, or have too many polygons, the program will crash. Be sure to save often.

    I also feel that it will be easier with an external mouse and keyboard attached, but it works well with the tablet pen. Research a bit if a some of the controls or features and confuse you - once you know them, the program is very easy to handle. An absolute beginner can use this and still make something - I'd recommend everyone to give it a try, whether you've dabbled in 3d art or not.​

    Google Sketchup: Sketchup
    Price: FREE (or $495 for the Pro version)
    Type: 3D modeling
    Video:Youtube - Modeling a Tractor

    This is Google's modeling program. It's very capable and it's not very difficult to get a hang of - the free version is probably more than adequate for most people's needs. You can build simple objects in minutes. There are lots of models and tutorial videos out there to help you out with this program. Even if you're a 2D artist only, you might find this program useful.​

    Autodesk: Autodesk - 3D Design & Engineering Software for Architecture, Manufacturing, and Entertainment or Autodesk Education Community
    Price: High or FREE
    Type: 3D/ Vector/ Digital Painting/ Other

    Autodesk is a company, and they make many popular programs. The only one I have tried is Sketchbook Pro. They have many 3d programs, however.

    The one reason I include this here is to tell students: if you have a student email (for example, one that ends in .edu, but this is not necessary as long as it is an official school email. I believe that only colleges and universities distribute these, however.) you can get over 20 programs for free. You can receive 3 year licenses for their many programs, which include Maya and AutoCAD and Sketchbook Pro (incidentally, this is how I got a copy). If you are a student, don't hesitate to register and download something.​

    Blender:blender.org - Home
    Price: FREE
    Type: 3D modeling/rendering/animation

    This is an extremely robust 3D program. However, it does have a significant learning curve, from what I have heard.​

    Utilities

    Tablet PC's have a big draw-back when it comes to drawing - lack of shortcuts. Aside from the buttons on your stylus, and possibly the buttons on your tablet face, you don't have a way to hit a modifier, or Undo, etc. There are some programs that can help you out here.

    Strokeit Strokeit - Mouse Gestures
    Price: FREE
    Type: Gestures
    Platform: Windows

    Strokeit is a very small application that runs in the background. Note that you'd probably want to turn off Flicks if you want to use this. In a nutshell: it allows you make custom mouse gestures that can be assigned to keystrokes (and more). Furthermore, these gestures are context dependent - you can have a different set of gestures for every program. To activate a gesture, you hold a designated button - typically the right-click button - and draw a gesture. For the most part, the program works well. (I have had some problems with GIMP in windows, but nowhere else.)

    For example, my setup in Mypaint:
    Left Flick = CTRL Z
    Right Flick = REDO
    Down Flick = Decrease Size
    Up Flick = Increase Size
    Up / = Zoom in
    Down / = zoom out.
    S = Save

    and so on. A must have if you do not want to carry a USB keyboard around.​

    EasyStroke EasyStroke
    Price: FREE
    Type: Gestures
    Platform: Linux

    This is the Linux equivalent of easystroke. It is just as functional, and everything I said about easystroke applies.

    I have had a few problems with it, but it is likely I messed something up, being inexperienced with Linux. It crashes whenever I set keystrokes (though they do save). Weirdly enough, where I have problems with Gimp and gestures in Windows, I have slight (annoying, but manageable) problems with gestures in Mypaint with EasyStroke.​

    Modlock Modlock
    Price: FREE
    Type: Shortcuts
    Platform: Windows

    This software makes a small bar of virtual keys on your screen. As such, you can make them be CTRL Z, Alt, Space, Ctrl, Shift, or other such useful keys. I have not used it much, finding it a bit fussy, but give it a try.​

    Tablet Pressure Curve Tool: Program Page
    Price: FREE
    Type: Settings
    Platform: Windows

    This program is exactly what the name suggests - it lets you edit the pressure curve of your tablet with a GUI (via a curve). Very nice if you press down hard all the time for dark lines and such.​

    NEW! Lazy Nezumi: Mouse Smoothing
    Price: $30 (or $15 for students)
    Type: Mouse
    Platform: Windows

    A program that smooths out the path of your mouse as you draw. If you've ever used the stabilizer setting in Paint Tool Sai, it's very similar.

    AutoHotKey Toolbars: Photoshop Toolbar, Surface Pro/Large Toolbar, ArtDock
    Price: FREE
    Type: Shortcuts
    Platform: Windows

    If you have a tablet computer with pen and multitouch, you'll love these. By installing AHK and running the script you choose, you'll have a virtual shortcut keyboard on your screen - one that rejects the pen and only accepts touch input. It's very useful when you're using a Surface Pro or any Windows slate tablet. There are more than the three I've linked, and if they lack the program/shortcut you're looking for, you can always pick up some AHK and whip up your own. Of the three I've linked, I use the third most often.

    If have a tablet with multitouch, I can't recommend these enough. They are pretty simple to customize and add docks for any software you'd like.​

    To add: Win 8 drawing apps, AZdrawing/AZpainter, zbrush, etc.

    Credits: klachowski - Not sure how I forgot about Sketchup
    thatcomicguy - Thanks for telling me about MangaLabo
    doobiedoobiedum - for further info and descriptions for Mypaint, Vectorian Giotto, Synfig, PAP, Illustrator and Inkscape.
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2014
    jaekqubp and Marty like this.
  2. SDreamer

    SDreamer Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I'm suprised you didn't mention Paint.net as well. It's a pretty good program.
     
  3. purplepeopledesign

    purplepeopledesign Scribbler - Standard Member

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    You can add SmartDraw, Journal and SketchUp, although I prefer Rhinoceros for 3D work.

    :)ensen.
     
  4. SDreamer

    SDreamer Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I gave most of the free ones a try under the painting category. The only ones I like are Open Canvas and myPaint. Next up, GIMP, Phihera were pretty good, but couldn't stand their interfaces long enough (especially when the cursor you're drawing with is an arrow, makes it hard to see for lefties the outcome of their stroke. Open Canvas seems to have enough tools make make some outstanding looking art, and myPaint seems to be the best for sketching becaue of the unlimited canvas.

    EDIT: Just gave Twistedbrush a try, it's pretty nice but limited with the brushes (free edition), and the pen tool had a minimum size of 4 and you can't make it lower (makes sketching a pain). Does have a burn and dodge tool, and the oil brushes were pretty fun to toy around with. For some reason makes 7 switch to basic mode.
     
  5. klachowski

    klachowski Pen Pal - Newbie

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    This is useful list, thanks Ice! I'd just like to add that I've been using the free version of Google SketchUp lately with good results. It's the most inuitive 3D program I've ever used, though it does have its share of learning hurdles and quirks to over-come, but the number of available training videos helps with those.
     
  6. Ice

    Ice Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Does anyone have any programs to add? I know a fair deal of raster graphics programs, but very few of other types, like 3D and vector...
     
  7. Ice

    Ice Pen Pal - Newbie

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    SDreamer, this is a very late reply on my part.... in GIMP, at least, you can change what the cursor looks like. Go to Edit-->Preferences-->Tool Windows, and mess with the settings under Mouse Pointers.
     
  8. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    This list continues to be a great resource, and thank-you Ice for updating it today!

    You already have Open Canvas listed, (by Portalgraphics), but they have another program which I find intriguing; it's called, "MangaLabo", and it's quite cool. (Free to try with limited saves and no exporting / $72.50 for the full-feature package).

    It specializes in Black & White manga creation, and has a host of useful tools specialized for this task, and is marketed to both amateur and professional manga artists. It offers both bitmap and vector tools, as well as a built-in 3D modeling tool for creating simple object environments you can layer and use as line-guides for drawing over.

    -The MangaLabo engine makes use of this guide-line system, whereby you can lay out (with MUCH greater ease than Photoshop), vector pathways, like little grooves, which you can then run your brush over to create smooth-looking lines which still look like a human drew them. It's very easy to use, and the program offers right in the side bar menu a selection of different grids, including 3D vanishing point of perspective line grids, star grids and other adjustable templates for assisted line-drawing. It's a damned cool feature.

    Also, MangaLabo lets you pick what level of data you want your image to be rendered in, from 1 bit (monochrome), 8 bit (Grey scale) or 32 bit (color). This means you can get the most out of your memory depending on what kind of work you're doing.

    It also allows for easy canvas rotation, a selection of Deleter Screen Tones, and has a complete set of black & white inking/penciling tools. And it's quite affordable. AND the team is actively updating the software. The last update was only a month ago.

    I came this close to shelling out for it, (around $75), except for one minor detail: my computer wasn't quite fast enough to run it smoothly at the high level of resolution and canvas size I want to work at. That is, making fast circles with my stylus resulted in that 'stop sign' look. Not good. But my machine is a single-core Pentium M, so I think perhaps the software can be forgiven. Also, the GUI is rather "last-decade" in a GIMP kind of way. I always find that when your cursor can only be a picture of the tool you are using; a little pen or little picture of an eraser, rather than a precise cross hairs or circle, the whole affair, no matter how powerful, feels a bit like a kid's toy.

    It's very close to being must-have great for guys like me (who live and breathe black & white comics). I'm going to be watching future incarnations closely, and if they pull it up to the performance standard I need, then I'll buy it in a wink.

    I'd be curious to know how well it performs for people with faster machines.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 18, 2015
  9. Ice

    Ice Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I'd never heard of MangoLabo, thanks. I downloaded the trial to see what it was like and... well, I see what you mean about the GUI being rather "last decade". To make things more confusing, I'm pretty out of my element here, not being a comic artist...

    What resolution do you like to work at? I scribbled around in the biggest template I found (8000x6000?) and it ran pretty smoothly unless I tried using the 'round' bristle brush or tried moving the layers around.

    If you are still looking for software, there is a Japanese software called 'Illustudio' that has some of the features you mentioned - it lets you make guide lines that you can draw along easily, it has some simple vector tools, and some 3D modeling tools to help users out. It's likened to a mixture of Paint Tool Sai, Opencanvas and Photoshop. Here's a thread with some videos and download and patching information. You'll have to download the trial and patch it to English if you want to try it, though.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 18, 2015
  10. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Actually, I've been noodling around some more with Mangalabo. My canvas size is 5000 x 8000, and I notice that when doing fast sketching with the whole canvas visible zoomed all the way out, the linework goes down with some delay so big sketches are a bit slow. When zoomed in, things speed up appreciably and it's fine. Not the best situation; Photoshop and Sai don't have this problem.

    I have to say, though, that I'm really liking it for inking. Like Sai, it out-classes Photoshop in terms of brush action by a mile; inks look great on Mangalabo. And it doesn't have this one issue Sai does; Sai assumes 32 bit work spaces even if you're working in Black & White, and in my maxed out 2 Gigs of memory this means limited canvas sizes, often allowing me to ink only one or two panels at a time and having to stitch them back together in Photoshop. If I go over the memory limit (which can happen when the undo levels stack too high) Sai will freeze for minutes at a time. Thankfully, if you go make a coffee and rest for a few minutes, WinXP will recover itself and you can save the document, but it's really annoying, especially when you're pushing a deadline.

    Being able to work on whole pages at a time and not have to worry about memory overflow in Mangalabo makes it quite attractive.

    But I'm quite interested in what you were saying about IllustStudio. I'm on the hunt for a trial version now. (The parent company doesn't seem to offer one, or any way to buy a legit copy for that matter from their website.)

    I'll report back when I get it figured out.

    Cheers!
     
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