Lenovo Yoga 720 - 15.6" Convertible with Active Pen, GeForce 1050 and Quad-Core CPUs

Discussion in 'Lenovo (IBM)' started by ibmthink, Feb 11, 2017.

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  1. BigDragon

    BigDragon Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I'm still waiting to see if the 1050 4GB comes to the US. There's a lot of European listings indicating it's coming in May. Hopefully that also applies over here too. I'll buy once it's available. I'd feel really stupid if I bought the current top-spec model with the 1050 2GB only for the 4GB to show up in a few weeks.
     
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  2. DreadfulDrummer

    DreadfulDrummer Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Finland is actually awesome for everything tech and quick and nippy internets all over.
    ...but, yeah, no Yoga 720 so forget about it!
     
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  3. cybertri

    cybertri Pen Pal - Newbie

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    [QUOTE="I know that the perfomance dip isn't that big with eGPU, but you have to consider that TB3 even at 40Gb/s already limits the GPU a tiny bit and the typical laptop CPU will also cause a double digit performance gap compared to a desktop rig......"[/QUOTE]

    So, does the Yoga 720 solve this problem since it uses a full quad Core i7? Does it make it worth an attempt at eGPU even with 2 lanes of PCIexpress due to it;'s strong CPU?
     
  4. okieiam

    okieiam Scribbler - Standard Member

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    lol
    :vbbiggrin::newpalm:
     
  5. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    I've not looked closely at this, but wouldn't it be fair to say that most of these supposed speed issues are rather inconsequential -and even a little OCD when you really stop to consider them?

    People have been using computers to draw for a couple of decades now, and the super-fast machines from then would have lagged far behind today's "slow" machines.

    Unless you're doing 3D work, heavy animation tasks, or are pushing enormous screen resolutions with insufficient processor power.., (which I'd consider a genuine hardware design problem), then does any of this really make a noticeable difference to the average raster illustrator or note-taker?

    -I don't mean to be snarky with this question; I recognize that manufacturers of every kind often, after they have established what works, then proceed to cut corners down to, "barely functional" -which even the casual user can notice when comparing an original design to a new one. Does that problem apply here in the area of processor and memory speeds? Are people really being frustrated while working by CPU and memory speed issues?

    -My cheap Core i3 Dell from last year was incredibly fast and capable -by orders of magnitude- compared to the old Pentium M 2004 machine I am currently working on, -which remains perfectly adequate for 90% of my art tasks. The biggest thing really holding it back remains the hard memory ceiling of 2Gigs.

    Hmm...

    So yeah. Maybe a little snark. :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2017
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  6. Marty

    Marty Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    This might be a little tangential to your point (which I mostly agree with), but has anyone else occasionally thought about the advantages of technological re-gression?

    @thatcomicsguy, I've worked in the digital medium for about 7-10 years now, but I swear every time I pickup a quality pencil or brush (analog :p), somehow I feel like all of it is for nothing.

    To what extent is complex software and powerful CPUs actually replacing the artist's mind and hand? When a line can be corrected, tone and value changed with a wave of the hand, and advanced filters applied even after the work should be "complete", how much does this take away from our ability as creators to envision and invest into our artwork?

    I sometimes feel like all the bells and whistles of technology actually hinders our artistic development...
     
  7. okieiam

    okieiam Scribbler - Standard Member

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    You don't compare today pen with next 10 years PC power!
     
  8. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Dave Sim once commented to me in a pub many years ago now when we were discussing scanners and computers, (when Wacom was best known for its 'blind' tablets)...

    "Just let me finish drawing Cerebus. When I'm done, the world can go and digitize the Mona Lisa if it has to."

    Computers are overpowering us. And it didn't take a Terminator bot from the future to do it. The battles of this reality, in this era at least, are much more of the mind and spirit.

    I find when I draw on paper, people can sometimes recognize it. That's probably a good thing.

    This is from my physical sketchbook, (which also rides around with me wherever I go)...

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Marty

    Marty Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Woah! You hang out with Dave Sim? It's nice to know there's a community of Canadian talent...I sometimes feel we're just a bunch of loners until we get 'discovered' then have to move away from our hometowns.

    So maybe I was a little dramatic when I talked about technological regression being a good thing (that's what late night mulling will do to ya ;)), but what I meant to say was:

    I feel somewhere along the way, technology seems to wandered into a rabbit hole of specs "one-upmanship" ...

    We think of technology as the evolution of human tools...at it's most basic level, things we use with our hands. And yet, it's taken us decades of computing to simply realize the usefulness of a touchscreen (iPhone 2007), and another decade after that, to realize the usefulness of a stylus (2-in-1 market 2017).

    All this computing power, and we barely have a functioning stylus that can draw a straight diagonal line!

    Something seems amiss here...where is the vision that motivates human digital tools? What happened to technology as tools we hold, tools that mold to the great expressiveness of the human hand, of touch and texture?

    It seems all we hear on this front are interesting proof-of-concepts doomed to the margins of computing history, while mainstream computing trudges forever onward in a quest for evermore "thinness", evermore "Hz" and "GBs"...to the ultimate goal of...

    ...what, exactly? :vbconfused:

    (Such are the quandaries of the philosophical tech nerd...)
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2017
  10. steven

    steven Pen Pal - Newbie

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    :D Priorities! It's all about setting the wrong priorities. No better way to miss out on opportunities.
     
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