Lenovo Yoga 720 - 15.6" Convertible with Active Pen, GeForce 1050 and Quad-Core CPUs

Discussion in 'Lenovo (IBM)' started by ibmthink, Feb 11, 2017.

  1. kneehowguys

    kneehowguys Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    So what do you guys think of the Lenovo Yoga 720 15.6 inch with stylus vs the new 2017 HP spectre 15 inch with stylus?

    Looks like the yoga 720 more powerful since it has a quad core processor (don't think the new HP spectre 15 inch has one?) but has less battery life.
     
  2. cutterline

    cutterline Scribbler - Standard Member

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    IMHO, based on spec alone, it's depends on your usage case with assumption of 15" 4K display as the main driver to bring around.
    If you have more stationed usage, this one is better for the spec. If you're a mobile person, I think 15" x360 spectre is better. GPU is not a major factor in these nowadays as you can use eGPU later on.

    It's too early to say anything, we don't even know the pricing for this yet and I'm curious about the battery life on the 1080p model. Personally, I might get this one if there's nothing wrong with it.
     
  3. lifereinspired

    lifereinspired Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I am SO excited about seeing this rumored laptop/2-in-1. It's almost exactly what I've been looking for and have been unable to find - a quad core 2-in-1 with Nvidia graphics. I've not been able to understand why manufacturers (other than Microsoft) don't seem to think that people would like the flexibility of a 2-in-1 with the power of a quad core processor. This would be great for photo or video editing and lots more. The option to have an active pen is even better. I really hope this becomes available and is somewhat reasonably priced. :)
     
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  4. Marty

    Marty Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Spec-wise, the top-end this kicks the crap out of the MobileStudio Pro 16 and perhaps even the vaunted Z Canvas...now all that remains to be seen is how well cooled all those high-powered parts are.

    If Lenovo is up to the task, this could be (the only) true Z Canvas replacement...
     
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  5. lifereinspired

    lifereinspired Pen Pal - Newbie

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    If it had the small power brick that the current Yoga 710 has, I don't care so much about the battery life... It's easy to plug the unit when the battery gets low (or for that matter get a 20000ah USB-C battery brick for additional time away from the outlet) but you can't replicate the power of a quad core and discrete graphics (Nvidia 10 series, no less!) any other way. I tried a new Kaby Lake core i7 7700u and honestly, compared with my previous nearly 4 year old core i7 quad core, it chokes. It often can't even keep up with a lot of tabs open in Chrome. It's been brought it to its knees multiple times with full memory and CPU usage (16gb RAM).

    I personally think it's a brilliant idea and will be a unique unit on the market at the time of release. Seriously, the only other 2-in-1 that I've been able to find is the Surface Pro and that's seriously pricey. It's hard to even find a reasonably lightweight quad core laptop. This is literally exactly what I've been looking for. I just couldn't understand why manufacturers didn't think that people would like the versatility of a 2-in-1 that's lightweight and great for media consumption (and with the active pen, potentially art!) with the power of a quad core. I think this will be a hit from with everyone from coders to musicians to artists and CAD engineers. I can't wait to see it. I hope they keep the pricing in a similar range as the current 710 series.
     
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  6. kneehowguys

    kneehowguys Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Bane!
     
  7. cutterline

    cutterline Scribbler - Standard Member

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    The bad news is this will have big power brick. Intel Quadcore (TDP 45W) + GTX1050 (TDP ~40-50W) power draw should be around 80-90 watt on average load (not max). For realistic example, I'm using ol' Asus from 2012 with intel quadcore and gt650m, and I got 120W big arsed power brick (15x6x4 cm). You can charge with smaller power brick but you'll confused because it turns off while charging because the power draw overwhelms that 50-60 watt small power brick.

    This statement actually answered "why manufacturers (other than Microsoft) don't seem to think that people would like the flexibility of a 2-in-1 with the power of a quad core processor"

    The market is smaller than you everday 'all day' battery office job laptop. This is actually can be categorized as mobile workstation, powerful but low battery life. The scenario is you work more on your station but if you really have to bring your tool, you bring this rather than a huge PC.

    Edit: If anyone wants to know the (almost) similar config power draw and power brick weight, see this review http://www.notebookcheck.net/Dell-XPS-15-2017-9560-7300HQ-Full-HD-Notebook-Review.195668.0.html
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2017
  8. kvoram

    kvoram Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    It indeed ticks a lot of boxes. What is disappointing for me at least and really odd compared to the much smaller Z Canvas, are the ports.
    The Yoga 720 is comparatively huge, yet it doesn't offer a dedicated video output and even worse it seems like no SD card slot whatsoever. So it's dongle hell again. :(

    I find Firefox (with NoScript addon) to be leaps ahead of other browsers when dealing with tons of tabs. Doesn't choke even with hundreds of tabs.

    The tech for smaller chargers already exists, like with chargers from Zolt, which sadly have gone bankrupt already, or from Finsix. Lenovo had licensed the tech from Finsix a year ago, but AFAIK haven't yet offered their ThinkPad 65 W Micro Adapter. It is significantly smaller than your typical 65 W charger and would be a nice option if that tech was adapted to a 120 W charger.

    I have a cheap variation of the Finsix charger and it's working nicely and it's tiny.

    Zolt charger:
    [​IMG]

    Proposed ThinkPad 65 W Micro Adapter, compared to original Finsix charger and Lenovo's regular 45 W charger:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
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  9. cutterline

    cutterline Scribbler - Standard Member

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    It won't be happening anytime soon. For enterprise, margin dictates everything. My meaning of margin implies to like ease of manufacturing, labor cost, etc. I also doubt the safety of packing 120W ac to dc in a very dense package unless they have a good cooling mechanism.

    Let's see what's coming up for this laptop from Lenovo's offering. They don't have 120W, my bad, it is130W and both of them (1, 2) is over than 450 g, the very definition of power brick, lovely :D.
     
  10. kvoram

    kvoram Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Any kind of advanced charger is certainly not going to be included in the regular retail package. As you wrote, margin dictates everything, every cent counts. The chargers that we get inside the boxes of our decives are relatively cheap to produce. The money that manufacturers charge for another original replacement charger in no way represents the costs of that charger, those have a huge markup. So a better charger will always cost extra.

    But significantly smaller chargers of the future will not just cram the same tech in a smaller package. The chargers from Finsix and Zolt are early development byproducts from a technology shift in power converters/power supplies. This development uses very-high-frequency (VHF) power conversion technology. By increasing the frequency many times over they can significantly reduce the size of the components. An important part of that development is to replace the silicon-based semiconductor material in transistors, ICs with Gallium Nitride (GaN), because that material can deal with high voltages and high frequencies. This technology has the potential for future power converters to be a fraction of the current size and is in development by a lot of companies. It will be a while before we see commercial applications of that tech in the consumer market, but it is coming. Then we will be able to say goodbye to big power "bricks".

    On my wishlist for Christmas 2020 would be a nice convertible that includes both a GaN-based power converter and a super-capacitor within the device itself. Then all I would need is to connect a cable between my device and the power socket for a brief moment and have enough battery power for hours. :D
     
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