Lenovo Thinkpad 10 Tablet Discussion Thread

Discussion in 'Lenovo (IBM)' started by Bloody Nokia Adept, Apr 8, 2014.

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  1. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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  2. HJK

    HJK Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Can anyone point me to a tutorial that addresses how to use Here Maps for voice navigation offline? Or at least for navigation offline?
     
  3. ships10

    ships10 Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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  4. HJK

    HJK Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Bronsky and dstrauss
    I'm guessing from what I've seen you posting lately that your outlook is a bit less gloomy now--if you can do the diy fix on the screen, the Asus VTN8 actually runs pretty well otherwise.
    Is this right? Or do you still want to bake it in, with, or among a squirrel?
     
  5. gcoupe

    gcoupe Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I've not found a tutorial, probably because the HERE Maps app for Windows 8.1 is rather simple and intuitive (at least for me). It doesn't have voice navigation. You can download maps via the Charms/Settings menu. Once downloaded, the app should use them automatically if there is no internet present. To use navigation, simply choose "Directions" from the menu across the top of the app, and enter your start and destination locations (the start location will default to the current GPS coordinates found by the GNSS chip in the tablet). The route is then shown on the map, and also as a turn-by-turn list, which can be printed out.
     
  6. WillAdams

    WillAdams Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    When I tried Here Maps it used Wi Fi and didn't offer an option to use the GPS in my Asus Vivotab Note 8.
     
  7. Randall Garrett

    Randall Garrett Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Alan,

    First off, my apologies for not responding to your kind words and replying to your question earlier. I've been away and this thread sort of dropped off my RADAR amidst the other "clutter" that usually infests my view at the end of most years (EOY business items, personal calendar, etc.) Secondly, MY view on things is perhaps a more narrow view than Dan's might be - I am focused on business activities related to people who routinely work in the field (particularly spending a lot of their time outdoors) who do various types of inspections, usually related to buildings and their components (walls, floors, roof, appliances, condition, quality, etc.) I believe Dan's view to be much broader, so his experience may bring more value to you. That said, most of the things you mention are also done by my users - the method and (specialty vs. more generic) software just being different (?)

    My personal view is that both devices are worthy of consideration but the fact that (for most) the TP10 is more easily obtainable and likely costs less, would give it the edge. The TP10 is also noticeably move svelte - more so "in hand" than the raw specs might seem to indicate. From the pure hardware specs perspective, they will perform similarly, though the difference in active pen & digitizer technology may again tip things in favor of the TP10. The EP1000 gains points for those who need a bit more ruggedness and other environmental factors associated with the plethora of factory accessories available in HP's ecosystem. You did not specifically indicate this, but your post seems to indicate that most of your activities would largely be indoors, so again I feel that it would not be unreasonable to think that the TP10 is the better fit for you.

    Speaking of accessories, one item which all three have is the optional "keyboard dock" and IF that is a very important item for your daily usage scenario, you'll want to evaluate each device's keyboard accessory descriptions, pictures and specs. The TP10 has a really nice feel to it - ThinkPads in particular have a well deserved reputation for making one of (if not the) best feeling keyboards. Neither of the other two devices have as good of a feel as the Lenovo, but the way they "attach" may be superior for your usage. As can be easily seen in pictures, reviews, videos, etc., the TP10's keyboard is more of a "stand" vs. having a "latch" or other more secure method of attaching to the tablet to make the combination a "mini-laptop." In use on a desk, the TP10's keyboard works well, but in a lap, the attachment to the tablet is more precarious. Also note that the TP10's keyboard is just that - a keyboard, and there are no other connections (USB, charging port, HDMI, etc.) Both of the keyboard accessories for the Q584 and EP1000 attach more securely and make the combination more like a mini-laptop. The HP's keyboard accessory ("Productivity Jacket") is thicker, more heavy duty, etc. which may not be to your liking (?)

    Finally, I have to wonder if you should not be adding the excellent MS Surface Pro 3 to your list of devices to consider. My experience with them has been very positive, although without proper protective accessories they are not my top pick for our users (despite this, they are very, very popular with our users - advertising and exposure works, LOL.) Most folks here report that note taking, and in particular PDF annotation, is excellent on the SP3 and the 3:2 (15:10 for comparison) is wonderful in portrait mode. The Keyboard accessory actually works much better in practice than it might first appear and I might add that while "looks" are a factor, what matters is performance. I would think that the lowest end SP3 with Core i3 would certainly blow away any of the other three devices with respect to actual raw performance (CPU, GPU, real SSD vs. eMMC, etc.) and the price once a complete "system" is packaged is not really all that different. With respect to pricing, only the TP10 would end up being less - the EP1000 and Q584 will actually cost more. The downside to the Core i3 model is, of course, that it is only available with 64GB of storage. Hence, you may end up spending about $100 more (?) to get a Core i5 with 128 GB SSD. IF you settle on an SP3 I strongly recommend buying it through MS and adding their excellent $99 Complete Care package (accidental damage protection.) I feel that their offering is superior to buying it through (say) Best Buy and getting a 3rd Party (i.e. Square Trade?) policy.

    I hope this helps! If I have missed something, let me know and I'll do my best to respond accordingly.


    -Randall Garrett-
    +Apex Software+

    /end/
     
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  8. HJK

    HJK Scribbler - Standard Member

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  9. Mesosphere

    Mesosphere Geek. Senior Member

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    I think part of the problem is tablet market share, but the bigger issue is probably smartphone market share. These apps are being developed for smartphones first andforemost which dwarfs the tablet market. I'd bet the market for tablet based GPS navigation is pretty small. Without the phone market, I doubt there would be much for iOS either.

    Windows doesn't have a chance right now. Unified app development across Microsoft's OSs they are working on should help, but WP isn't really big enough to help much I think.

    Really though. I don't expect windows to be a direct competitor to mobile first OSs like iOS/Android any time soon. Windows tablets are for a very different use case. Namely full featured software in the tablet for factor. Like MS Office, Photoshop, etc. If what you want is a blown up phone experience with simple but highly mobile taylored apps, Andoid and iOS are just better and will probably remain so for some time to come.
     
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  10. gcoupe

    gcoupe Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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