Lenovo Thinkpad 10 Tablet Discussion Thread

Discussion in 'Lenovo (IBM)' started by Bloody Nokia Adept, Apr 8, 2014.

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  1. TT137

    TT137 Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Don't sweat it, the capacity is estimated by the charge circuitry and will probably rise after a couple of weeks and charge cycles. Be sure to just use the tablet, letting it run down and don't top it off constantly.
     
  2. unrealtrip

    unrealtrip Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I am jealous of you guys that got yours today. Mine was supposed to as well, but the planets aligned just wrong and the UPS guy came during the one time I left the house all day for 10 minutes to pick up the little bear. :(

    On the SP3 vs TP10 thing, I had an SP3 i5 8/256gb which I used extensively daily for two weeks before returning it. MS did a good job, and it is a basically nice device that unfortunately has some pretty major shortcomings which combined with a near absurd cost make it a bad choice IMO.
     
  3. dpeters8445

    dpeters8445 Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I received my thinkpad 10 yesterday. Question for those of you that have the keyboard. My pen goes in the keyboard slot real hard. So hard that I'm scared that if I stick the pen all the way, that I won't be able to pull in out. Anybody else with the keyboard have this problem?

    Thanks, Doug
     
  4. zendokan

    zendokan Pen Pal - Newbie

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    What are the major shortcomings compared to the TP10? I see only minor ones that depend on the way how you use it (notebookreplacement, portable tablet)? Also the 8/256 model does not really compare to the TP10, this is more a high end hybrid ultrabook-tablet.
     
  5. Criamos

    Criamos Pen Pal - Newbie

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    @dpeters8445:
    have you removed the little (soft plastic?) piece that covers the opening for the pen? sounds like it's stuck inside the pen slot.
     
  6. beckyb

    beckyb Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Well, mine is going back. It is just too small to be my only computer. Would be great for a travel companion though.

    I never did figure out why the Microsoft Mobile mouse 4000 wouldn't work. Also, this morning when I tried to use the stylus, it was not recognized, only the finger touch worked. After re-boot, it was fine, but that makes me a little nervous after all the problems Asus had with the Note 8 and the stylus that stopped working.

    I'll keep my Thinkpad Yoga for my main computer.

    I'm also holding onto the TPT2 I picked up on ebay. If you're thinking about getting one of those, watch for the Buy It Now auctions from the seller Certicell. I am very happy with the one I got from them as it was a bit less than $150 with stylus, NFC, and WLAN (was not expecting the WLAN). It has a few light scratches on the screen, but nothing that shows up when it was on. It was one of the ones listed in "Good" condition from them.
     
  7. dpeters8445

    dpeters8445 Pen Pal - Newbie

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    That must be the problem them. I'll have to try to dig it out.

    Thank you.
     
  8. zendokan

    zendokan Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Decision gets even trickier. Today I could test the surface pro 3. The typecover is a good protection, but the keyboard is simply crap to type on if you are used to a good thinkpad keyboard in the past, typing on the touchscreen virtual keyboard is better than spending over 100€ for this. Also if you get academic discount for the SP3, you only get 1 year warranty, this is a bit of a cooler when spending 800-1000€. The kickstand is really nice, seems very robust. But for notebook/desktop replacement the 64 GB SSD - windows 8 ~ 20 GB installation forces you to get a SDXC, but can you really install and load software fast from that?

    Another soon competitor if you can wait till November are probably the Broadwell Core M tablets like the Asus Transformer Book T300 Chi, which has SSD and fanless broadwell, more powerful than atom also I don't read the cpu is much improved to haswell, mainly the GPU has boosted by 50%. 12,5" display but only 637 g weight, so thin that only a micro USB found place.

    Lenovo will probably also offer new tablets with broadwell then, but probably not before december/january, don't know if I want to wait so long and if this Core M can really compete with a i5 or i7, but this 3:2 Tablet format will probably become know common for the right reason. Actually the TP10 with 10" 3:2 would be wide enough in horizontal mode to use it some hours a day. 11" to 11.6" would be my choice for portable tablet and notebook for vacation. Currently I think the SP3 i5 would resell best when broadwell and 3:2 are standard and you have many nice models to choose.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 18, 2015
  9. koz2050

    koz2050 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Sorry to hear that. For a primary computer I would think you would want a docking station with regular monitor and keyboard and a USB hub for other stuff. Trying to do everything on the Tablet would be a bit frustrating (for me anyway).

    I'm going to be selling my TT2 i just bought and and I'll keep the TP10 until the Helix 2 ships and maybe upgrade at that point. If anyone's interested in the TT2...

    First run through on the TP10 was 10 hours of use, 4 hours to charge while being used from about 6% battery life.
     
  10. unrealtrip

    unrealtrip Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Once I get in some more time with the TP10 I will write up something a little more in depth but for now here are some quick observations on both products so far. But first, something that often gets overlooked, a quick background and my use case. :)

    Professionally I am a software engineer and graphic artist, and personally I enjoy photography and artistic endeavors in general. I have a two and a half year old son (which I think is important to point out because that statement just put every father/mother here on the same page as me generally speaking), and I'm about to start taking some online college classes shortly; semi-relevant point of fact 40 is right around the corner. o_0 Also of note, I work entirely remotely.

    I need a powerful machine for my "standard" development work which is predominantly in Visual Studio and the Adobe Creative Suite. For that task I actually use a laptop, which I've found to work out well enabling me to bring my development platform with me from home office to corporate office, to campgrounds, to... That said however, there is a small gap in the portability factor in that lugging around a basically large laptop and "setting up shop" so to speak, is a reasonable amount of effort. I do it often, but there are definitely times where it would be ideal not to have to. Not to mention the periods of time where I've got the kiddo and it just isn't practical, but I am able to pop up a small device while on the couch and knock out a little here or there.

    So major factors for me given the above are portability, long battery life, and a reasonable enough amount of juice to handle things like Visual Studio and Photoshop, and from an artistic angle I need a quality active digitizer. That last part of my needs limits the field significantly as there are actually very few Windows machines out there that meet that criteria.

    There are a lot of things I really liked about the SP3 quite a bit, and there are areas where it is quite a bit nicer than the TP10 in fact. The SP3 has a significantly more "premium" feel to its build. The TP10 doesn't feel cheap, in fact it also has a very nice build quality, but the SP3 really does shine in this regard and I'm sure a good deal of that difference in "solidness" comes from the TP10's plastic frame. That being said, the TP10 is not flexy so to speak, but it does lack the stiffness exhibited by the SP3. I actually found the type cover on the SP3 quite nice, and the kickstand now that it can adjust in so many degrees is also a great feature. Anyway now I'm getting rambly, let me get to the points of contention I had.

    SP3 Issues:
    - It runs hot.... remarkably hot, and it got hot often. Hot enough that I would not expect it to have a very long life due to it's tightly packed in design. Which leads to the fan. It is loud... remarkably loud, and it came on often. I would not ever consider putting that thing in a case, you'd cook it off.

    - The battery life was not very good, and for a device that needed to provide me with a lot of uptime as a predominantly mobile platform, that's not a good thing.

    - The pen: It needs batteries. The tips are soft are wear down extremely fast. It is not possible to make a straight line with it. It also has less sensitivity then a good Wacom, and it has no way to adjust anything about it (sensitivity, range, etc...) Top off the below fragility statement, with the fact that to approach the upper end of its short range you have to press on the glass so hard you fear it will crack, and well... there you go.

    - It is fragile. Earlier generations of the surface were extraordinarily tough, while this one is not. Many of them have been coming back with broken glass. MS statement: they had to make the glass thinner, and ditch the Wacom tech in favor of Ntrig so that they could make the device thin. Really? Lenovo seems to have pulled it off just fine.

    - The resolution is completely whack. It is nice, it is clear and bright, and it is extremely sharp. It is also unsupported by well, most things, including Photoshop CS6. When not supported, you end up with menus that are so small they are hard to use, while some others are completely unusable.

    - The camera was almost unusable when you would attempt to take a picture with it from OneNote, which is funny because that application is like their main focus with this tablet. Which is another annoying fact, the eraser click being hardwired to one app which you can't change... surely to be fixed with a software release later on but for now.

    So the big issues are: battery life, display, longevity due to heat, loud fan due to heat and the pen.

    TP10 observations so far:
    - The usb2 vs 3 on the single port doesn't really matter too much to me. The door over it is a little annoying, but it does give it clean sides. That said, it seems weird to me that they'd go through the trouble of covering up the left and right side ports, but the entire bottom is exposed.

    - I've got a thing for symmetry, idk maybe some artistic thing or whatever, but the square edge vs. round edge thing is annoying aesthetically speaking ;though obviously an insignificant issue. The whole "square so it can fit in the keyboard dock" is absurd as the entire bottom edge is flat so that makes no sense.

    - The pen experience makes me feel embarrassed for all other active pen tablets I have used or owned. It is smooth, fluid, accurate and the pressure sensitivity is awesome. The pen has no need for batteries to die, which makes it consequently not as heavy or prone to fly out of your hand as the others. The nib has a perfect amount of drag on the glass, it doesn't feel overly slippery like the hard plastic on glass of the Synaptics debacle that the Dell Venue tablets have. Speaking of which, anyone referring to the Dell Venue as an alternative to the TP10 has definitely never used the pen. I'm amazed that thing remains on shelves...

    - Can't speak to the keyboard, I have a Bluetooth Logitech tablet keyboard (which I'm typing on now) that is awesome.

    - Battery life shames everything else I've used.

    - Screen is very nice, resolution is excellent and I love the return to 1920x1200, I have lamented the rise of 1920x1080 over the years...

    - I love the sensitivity on the start softkey. It's not over or undersensitive, its just different. You just need more of your finger to hit it, which is great because I don't find that I'm constantly getting thrown back to the Metro start menu by accident like the SP3 is known for and I had experienced.

    - Mixed feelings on the charger. I like that it charges fast, and that the connector is very solid compared to a micro-usb, but that said, it is an unfortunate extra to have to carry when traveling.

    - Heat is a non-issue, at its worst it has gotten very warm.

    - Fairly snappy response so far, no it isn't an i7 with 8GB of memory, but it is significantly more responsive than I was expecting. That said, give me a couple weeks of use before you take that statement to heart.

    ---

    I don't dislike the SP3, I think it is, as the last ones were, a marvel of engineering. That said however, I'm not sure what use case it is trying to fit. As a tablet I found it a little overly large and unwieldy with short battery life, excess heat and noise. As a laptop/ultrabook, the type keyboard was basically nice, but not as good as any of the competition, and in that mode the display was hair on the small side, not to mention the storage capacity. To me it was just mediocre at a lot of things instead of being really good at anything. And in my case, I really need a device to excel in a few areas, which so far the TP10 seems to be.
    -t
     
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