Lenovo introduces new Yoga models with 'AnyPen' technology

Discussion in 'Lenovo (IBM)' started by surfaceproartist, Jan 5, 2015.

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  1. magicalUnicorns

    magicalUnicorns Scribbler - Standard Member

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    OUCH. Thank you for being the first ever to actually try it in sketchbook. You solved that choice for me. A pity really, I suuuuper wanted to use pencils for line drawing again on screen.
    I picked up my asus vivo note tab 8 again and had some of the photo don screen protectors still around but this time instead of peeling the glue guard off of the protector I just started drawing on the whole thing. It works better! Its clear as it gets no fuzzy screen issue with the guard still on and it gives a good plastic resistance. I guess ill mar up the guard more so then the protecter inside but this is much better now for drawing and getting some friction with no cost of clarity for the screen.

    Oh neat the lenovo at the store just went down as they sale out. Its 155 now.

    Anyway I say if you bought it for art send it back and try this asus out. Its like 100 on ebay and the better wacom pen is 65 on amazon of which I am now thinking of getting instead to upgrade it with.
     
  2. Jamon

    Jamon Scribbler - Standard Member

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    There's no option to boot from USB, or internal SD card.
     
  3. sweller

    sweller Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Hi folks. After struggling with Android through three tablets and countless custom ROMs, I gave up because of the constant crashing and decided to give Windows a try. If the Yoga Tab 2 8-inch is anywhere near what it's suppose to be, I'll be ecstatic. 90% of what I use a tablet for is reading the morning news and books using the Kindle app. The rest is browsing, an occasional video, and as a cookbook.

    The specs and reviews made this choice easy. However, buying from Lenovo left me with less than a warm, fuzzy. I guess I'm just spoiled by Amazon and IBM. I pulled the trigger Friday. It's not expected to get here until the 19th. Why does buying a refurb take so long to ship? There's more to the story than just that, but I'll spare everyone the gory details. There's already enough mud slung at Lenovo across the web.

    I was also wondering about the two different offering of the same model that others have mentioned. When I made my purchase there was only the one (cheaper one). Are they pre and post CES? Any reason to expect one should be any better than the other. Optimistically, if it was built for CES, they made sure it was the best of the best of the best. (I know better. I've personally witnessed disasters at trade shows.)

    Jamon: Did you get this skin or the one posted later? Has anyone put a skin on their Yoga? The other one reminds me of the Otter series. Bullet-proof, but I couldn't live with the integrated screen protector. I'm a firm believer in TPU-type cases. For me, they're the most convenient type. And film screen protectors, too. Once you figure out how to get a clean install (Do it in the bathroom with a hot shower going. Lot's of steam, microfiber cloths, bright light, and a can of air). Though on the Yoga with AnyPen, do you really need/want a screen protector?
     
  4. Jamon

    Jamon Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I've only seen one model.

    I assumed the screen protector could be pried off. I had the tough protective case for the ThinkPad 10, and it had a hard plastic screen protector built-in, but with pressure it could be popped off because it was attached with adhesive.

    I didn't get a case yet. I'm not sure what kind would be best for it yet. It's almost a shame to cover it up with a skin. I can see why someone would prefer to use it bare, and store it in the sleeve.

    I never use screen protectors. They degrade visibility, and the screens usually don't get scratched unless sand gets caught between the stylus tip and the glass, or you drop it on rock. I've been using a pencil for most swipes and taps without worry.

    I was getting tired of the Android scene too. But Windows 8.1 isn't fully satisfying either. But for reading news and video, it should be fine. Windows tablets often have low pixel density like older laptops did. But this 8" with 1920x1200 is relatively sharp at 283 PPI, about the same as my Galaxy Note. The backlight also doesn't have obnoxious PWM flickering when lowered. It gets dim for night use, and bright for outdoors.

    The AnyPen tech is basically like a capacitive stylus, but with a little better precision. It's not very sharp like Wacom though. I didn't try calibrating the touch yet, but the offset often causes me to miss tiny scrollbars, checkboxes, or buttons. I just got done using it as a notepad for writing down measurements along with rough squares, then dragged in the calculator for side-by-side calculations. The numbers were barely readable, and it was a pain trying to quickly scroll the pages in Journal, because it kept missing so I'd spend minutes on things that should take seconds. But I'd still rather have pencils work on touch screens like this than have only touch.

    The adjustable stand makes it easier to find ways to hold it, or prop it up. I kind of wish the hole in it was bigger, because then I could fit my finger in it and grasp it better in some positions. I can only fit the tip of my finger in there, but it can still be useful for getting a grip. It can be cramped feeling compared to a 5" phone that can fit better in wrapped hands. But I was holding it above me earlier with one hand, and it was far more practical for that than a heavier flat 10".
     
  5. sweller

    sweller Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Thanks, Jamon. I probably learned as much from that one post as I did in the last two weeks of web surfing.

    These are the only two cases/covers/skins I've seen. The latter I hadn't until I wandered in here:
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...kCode=as2&tag=tpcf-20&linkId=6VENBRYXNG4TFVNF
    http://www.gumdropcases.com/collect...e-for-lenovo-yoga-tablet-2-8-black-black.html

    I'm a protective case person because... well... I'm a spaz. Even if it doesn't save the device, I feel better. As far as screen protectors go, a coworker summed it up nicely, "They keep the glass contained if you shatter the screen.'

    "But Windows 8.1 isn't fully satisfying either."
    I'd like more of your thoughts on that, please?

    "It gets dim for night use, and bright for outdoors."
    Automatically?

    "I didn't try calibrating the touch yet, ..."
    It has an in-built calibration function?
     
  6. Jamon

    Jamon Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I have a protective case on my Galaxy Note, with bumpers and a gap to protect the screen. It made it so much more useful, because the rubbery grip makes it easier to prop places and hold, and I freely drop and toss it without worry.

    It's just, the Yoga Tablet 2 is an elegant design, slim, and borderline lightweight. Adding the bulk of a protective case might push it into a less portable category. I'm not sure. The DropTech case won't ship for a month, and that's the one I'd probably buy, as long as the screen protector can be removed. But the tablet looks like it belongs on someone's nightstand, where it never needs protection because they only use it in bed.

    One of the worst part about Android tablets to me is that they're appliances in the control of the manufacturer instead of personal computers in the control of the owner. I was able to use people's exploits to gain access, and compile custom Android on my Linux workstation. But it's such a pain, and the latest version of Android does not work correctly on my old hardware, and there's no hope really because the drivers are not shared like they are with other Linux distros. I don't want to have to rely on my desktop to upgrade the OS, and go through all the work only to have to redo it all if I switch to another tablet model since the ROM package needs to be customized for every device.

    But this Windows tablet is running a 32-bit OS, and I need 64-bit to run a program. I haven't tried making a bootable Windows 8.1 64-bit USB yet, but Ubuntu did not work because it says there's no USB boot option. That's like an appliance again. I want to be able to simply install any OS I want at any time by booting into its installer. If the Windows USB won't work either, when Windows 10 is released maybe it'll only be able to be upgraded to the 32-bit version. This is more work than it should be, and it's restricted again like Android appliances. I don't want an appliance, I want a PC.

    Microsoft is doing the same "personal computing is dead; buy an appliance to access our cloud service" stuff. When the start screen appears, if I click the calendar so I can try to plan out some upcoming events, it says to sign into my Microsoft account and doesn't work when I don't. If I click Skype to make a call, it wants to use my Microsoft account, and won't work without it so I have to install the desktop version instead. If I click OneNote it needs the Microsoft account. I don't want all my private documents saved to Microsoft servers. If I use a notepad and pencil, I can jot down notes that are stored with me. If I use a Windows Tablet PC from before the appliance computing revolution it is like a digital notepad, and is basically like writing on paper, where all my resources are locally stored. But with Windows 8, they want it to be a service, a relationship. They want me to involve Microsoft, more like renting a hotel than sleeping in my own bed. I don't need Microsoft for anything other than the OS. I can copy my files to an SD card, USB drive, or upload them to my own servers. You have to use desktop OneNote to get something more like that, but I prefer the modern UI touch interfaces.

    Except the touch interface is better on android in many ways. Android is buggy and clunky, but it works better for many practical uses. Like on my Galaxy Note, I have a back button, so I quickly hit that from any screen and I go back. With Windows, there's these little circles with a back arrow in the upper left of some apps. With Android it feels smarter to guess what UI element I was aiming for even if I don't hit it perfectly. With Windows, I apparently don't always hit that little circle perfectly within its bounding box, because often I will see the touch animation indicator near the back button, and nothing happens. Then I have to repeat and aim better, which slows things down and is more cramped feeling than simply tapping the back button on my Android devices that is always in the same spot. There's stuff like that, like how I can use my volume keys on Android to move the text input cursor, and how I can use sliding text input, whereas with Windows there's only one keyboard and it only has tap input or handwriting. But to switch between handwriting and tap is slower than it should be so it's not practical to use both depending on what you're inputting. Then sometimes the virtual keyboard doesn't even pop up despite being in a text input, so I have to tap it again, and in desktop mode you always have to tap the keyboard icon to pop up the input panel, then hit the x to close it.

    It's also buggy, and the apps are ugly with banner ads and such. There's no Google apps. It's like Google is a bratty baby who doesn't want to let you play with their toys because it's your house, and they only want to play at their house where they're the center of attention. Trying to play YouTube videos is a pain in the web interface, and the 3rd-party apps aren't good and many don't even play videos anymore because there were some changes with how YouTube works. On Android it's easy, you search, tap, rotate to play fullscreen, hit back button and it keeps playing in a minimized box as you search for more, etc. There's little glitches, like right now in the Microsoft app store as I scroll horizontally there's this part on the right side of the screen where it's like the image is cut, and pasted 50 pixels downward, so text and images don't connect right there. Then there's the whole modern / old desktop conflict, where often the text in the desktop mode looks ugly and it's not a seamless integration between modes.

    There is automatic screen brightness, but I disabled it to control myself. I meant, it can get quite dim and bright. I think it's brighter than the ThinkPad 10. I used it outside today, and it was overcast and I wasn't in direct sun, but it got surprisingly bright enough for clear visibility.

    There is a calibration utility for the touch screen. The AnyPen tech is not separate for pen input like an active digitizer. It's a tighter grid for touch input, so it can resolve to maybe less than a millimeter or whatever, where conductive material can trigger it like a finger can. In software, it's all finger, so the same calibration tool for touch is what you use for AnyPen.

    I've improved the AnyPen experience, and still working on optimizing it further. It appeared like maybe the reason for the offset when the pencil was slanted was some interference because the rest of the graphite was too close to the screen. Even though it doesn't touch, it's like the pixels were registering as being touched where the furthest end of the graphite was. So I wore the pencil tip down to try to make it mostly wood, with only a tiny tip of graphite. I also calibrated it. I think the offset has decreased with that, and it appeared to be working much better for artwork precision with a quick test.

    Except the apps are not optimized for AnyPen because it uses the touch interface. With Journal, it keeps switching to the selection tool, because a long press is considered a right click. With SketchBook, it switches to the color-picker, so if you're drawing in black, as you make a line that it thinks is a long-press, it eyedrops the white canvas and then your stroke stops working because it's drawing white. Fresh Paint works best so far.

    Maybe after I've sanded down the pencil and tried things out more I can upload a closeup video to show how accurate it is. It feels like it has potential, but I'll need to find the right combo of software and stylus. If someone seriously wanted to do that for artwork or writing, maybe there's a thin glove you could use to prevent the resting hand from being counted as an input device.

    If it's polished more, there are some advantages to AnyPen over active digitizers. One of the reasons why Wacom has been better than N-trig is because with Wacom I can press more lightly. But with AnyPen, there's no force required, because it activates as soon as there's contact. Pressure sensitivity is overrated for many uses, and being able to use your own custom stylus you create from any pen or pencil with the least amount of force, and no battery, is nice.

    If the touch grid can become tight enough to offer pixel precision, then I'd prefer we ditched the Wacom, and instead used this conductive material option. Except then there'd be special pens for sale that use NFC to duplicate the special features of Wacom, like the pressure sensitivity, and buttons. Then you can use any pencil, plus you can use one of those special art pens. That way, you get zero activation force, and precise touch on pixels instead of wavering electromagnetic field tracking, plus the option for regular separate pen input interface in the software.
     
  7. sweller

    sweller Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Jamon, Thank-you for the detailed response. Most helpful.

    Unfortunately, I can't say the same for Lenovo. It's really starting to stink:

    They took my order on the 7th which I paid through Amazon (Thankfully!)
    Amazon notified me that it had been shipped and my credit card charged on the 12th.
    UPS just told me (on the 14th) they haven't received the package.
     
  8. Jamon

    Jamon Scribbler - Standard Member

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  9. DeathMoJo

    DeathMoJo The Navy Guy

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    Lenovo is extremely slow to ship, always have been. I'm not sure if its because they retest systems or just slow to process. The worst is items needing to be manufactured first and then shipped overseas.
     
  10. Jamon

    Jamon Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Here is a trick to have palm rejection, by avoiding contact between your skin and screen using fabric or gloves. In this video there were a few spots where a finger made contact, and the drawing stopped. Better to find thin and soft gloves that block your skin from triggering touch.
     
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