Kensington Surface Dock?

Discussion in 'Microsoft' started by desertlap, Feb 6, 2019.

  1. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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  2. dstrauss

    dstrauss Comic Relief Senior Member

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    There is no justification. Surface Pro already has a kickstand that is close to any of the angles the Kensington can produce. Port selection is really no better than the Surface Dock (other than a single USB-C port). You can nearly get two Surface Docks for the same price.
     
  3. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    That was my initial reaction. Seems to be far more (questionable) form over function.
     
  4. dstrauss

    dstrauss Comic Relief Senior Member

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    Kinda Apple-like...
     
  5. Lilawyn

    Lilawyn Pen Pal - Newbie

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    This information is probably no longer relevant to the question, but I own and have used the Kensington SD7000 with my Surface Pro 6. I bought it a week ago as a way to travel with my SP6... because one couldn't justifiably haul a Surface Studio across the country for a short vacation.

    Some thoughts on the dock:

    It is surprisingly heavy. I've manhandled my Surface Studio 2 into different rooms on different days, to draw in different lighting conditions, and assumed the weight of the Surface Studio was due to the screen, or the internals. The Kensington dock leads me to believe otherwise.

    It's fairly well constructed. The hinge has the tendency to drift downward over time when you leave the screen at certain angles (something I never experienced with the Studio hinge)--but the drift is minimal. 98% of the time, the hinge stays exactly where you leave it.

    The port selection is fine (though my basic-spec Surface Pro 6 can't drive 1080p video on a TV hooked up through the HDMI port). For my use case, the ports are the least interesting part of the dock. The Surface Dock would work just fine if all you need are a larger selection of ports to use with a Surface Pro 6/7.

    The magnets on the side of the dock are working as promised. Several reviewers mentioned the magnets tend to be attached weakly, and may fall off after minimal use. After a week of travel and jostling, the magnets remain attached. That's something to keep an eye on, and perhaps reattach more firmly if they fall off.

    You will need another keyboard to use with the Surface Pro 6 when using this dock. Objectively, I knew that while the Surface Pro 6 was docked in the SD7000, it wouldn't be able to connect to the type cover, but somehow this fact slipped my mind and forgot to buy something that could connect via bluetooth. I spent a week using the onscreen keyboard; it was fine, but I'd opt to buy a bluetooth keyboard to work with the Surface Pro 6 if I spent another week with it as my only computer.

    ...that is, after I'd saved up some, because holy **** is this dock expensive. If money is at all a concern, I would recommend against purchasing it.

    The condition under which I would recommend the Kensington dock: someone wants to buy a Surface Studio as a drawing workspace, can't afford the Studio, but would enjoy experiencing the dock hinge on a smaller form factor. Under those conditions, the Kensington is an amazing peripheral. The drawing experience with the Kensington hinge is as amazing as it is on the Surface Studio 2; the dock also adds a layer of stability and firmness to SP6 that makes long drawing sessions much more pleasurable.

    IMG_0404edit.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2020
    cmergel, djas and Marty like this.
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