Jeff's "Apple's Consumer-hostile Design Choices Make Me Nuts" Thread

Discussion in 'Apple/iOS' started by lovelaptops, Jul 25, 2019.

  1. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,512
    Likes Received:
    1,660
    Trophy Points:
    181
    Irony and tech are hand in glove :p
     
  2. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,512
    Likes Received:
    1,660
    Trophy Points:
    181
    @lovelaptops Jeff we are quite small compared to the tech giants, privately held company with annual sales in the $30-50 million range dependent on the year:)

    On the privacy front and the author of our "tech bill of rights", one of our founders used to work for one of the big antivirus companies and became appalled at the amount of data the apps collected while being virtually silent on that collection with customers. So as the saying goes "for him it's personal"
     
    lovelaptops and JoeS like this.
  3. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,512
    Likes Received:
    1,660
    Trophy Points:
    181
    Saw this today on the Verge and made me nostalgic. I had the OG TPS-L2. I worked all summer mowing yards to get one and the sound for the time was amazing.

    The relevance was that years later, I went to an Apple Education Demo for the original iMac and both Ive and Jobs were there. As we were milling around trying them out. Ive was among us and someone asked where the inspiration for see through colors came from.

    He mentioned several design prominent design houses, but he also specifically called out the Walkman. His description was that it was the perfect combination of both whimsy and function.

    So Apple is not always consumer hostile, or at least they weren't at one time.

    https://www.theverge.com/circuitbre...walkman-in-the-park-tokyo-exhibit-anniversary
     
    lovelaptops likes this.
  4. doobiedoobiedum

    doobiedoobiedum Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    900
    Likes Received:
    341
    Trophy Points:
    76
    With regard to the bold - I have been told by our IT guy that hard drives are very popular in some third world countries where they are plugged into banks of readers where old private data can be harvested.
    Could be an old wives' tale but it still reminds me of the old warning to remove your hard disc before you sell an old laptop on Ebay.
     
    lovelaptops likes this.
  5. lovelaptops

    lovelaptops My friends call me Jeff Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,377
    Likes Received:
    835
    Trophy Points:
    131
    Nicely put, @desertlap . Why am I not surprised? :)
     
    siddhartth likes this.
  6. siddhartth

    siddhartth Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    830
    Likes Received:
    300
    Trophy Points:
    76
    What's the point of having a system on chip and a modern compact Aluminium battery if you can not replace it, like a sim card or a microSD card.

    We need standardization of ports and sockets, before we run out of land to make more landfills. You never really own something if you can not upgrade it like you can upgrade a house you own. Imagine if the electricity sockets in your house became obsolete in a year or two because the industry has "moved on". We have had the same physical wall sockets since 60-80 years, but that hasn't stopped advancement in electronics has it? Industrial washing machines assembled in Pakistan 30 years back, and 45 watt charger of Note 10+ designed in Korea, both can operate out of the same wall socket. Type-C port can handle anything from USB 2.0 to Thunderbolt. We need similar standardization of Sockets and ports for SoC and Batteries. No body's is stopping Apple or snapdragon from A13x faster than A12x, they should just make sure they fit in the same socket, so that they are interchangeable for foreseeable 10 years.

    The forced demise of Headphone jack was not a natural progression, but a result of internal and mutual fixing of the marketplace by major tech companies. It was not innovation but greed. And now you have another thing to worry about - the battery of your earphones. If someone from 90s time travelled to present and saw the state of earphones today, you will have a hard time explaining him, how this isn't 20 years of step backwards in audio technology.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2019
    doobiedoobiedum and lovelaptops like this.
  7. lovelaptops

    lovelaptops My friends call me Jeff Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,377
    Likes Received:
    835
    Trophy Points:
    131
    You, sir, have 100% nailed it. There are many possible ways to resolve this ill but, given who holds the power and what motivates them, my view is that society will need to assess fees (aka, taxes) to producers who make products that can't be repaired, renewed, etc and only that will cause them to change their behavior - or, worst case, generate revenue to pay for the environmental damage caused by these practices. If course, the mfrs will pass the costs on to consumers but, at least in theory, that will motivate other mfrs to make products that are renewable that won't carry the cost burden of the "disposable fee" and will make such renewable products cost competitive with - preferably, cheaper than - the disposables.

    This approach needs to be applied economy-wide and globally on all such earth-hostile practices. The worst offenses do not come from technology products, though they do their share. Many people consider my whole premise to be "unworkable socialism" and even offensive, but it's where we will have to go to make a serious dent on saving the planet. In many ways, a "carbon tax" gets at the crux of this and it is increasingly considered one key element to a strategy for preserving the future for our kids, grandkids, etc. There are sacrifices to be made everywhere, but at least this approach uses "market mechanisms" to bring about positive changes.

    Sorry, I know I'm way off-topic (but also dead-center) but it is my reaction to @siddhartth 's excellent observation.
     
    siddhartth likes this.
  8. siddhartth

    siddhartth Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    830
    Likes Received:
    300
    Trophy Points:
    76
    Thanks for kind words, I just spoke what i felt to be true. And even, I am afraid to be labelled as a communist, whenever i mentionay Government regulation. But that is indeed, need of the hour. I am eager to see data on the life expectancy of individual components of modern pocket/wearable/lappable computets. So, that independent regulators like ISO or Governmental regulatory bodies can make informed policy on how to increase longevity of modern devices, based on failure of which components actually renders the device actually unrepairable.

    Such standards exist in every other industry from Cars to Construction. Why is just tech industry exempt from it?

    You know when taken out of context, this can be interpreted in a very different way. :p

    The environmental taxes and fees, that our already bought out lawmakers levy on the captains of industry, are way lighter than the pocket change for these mega corporations. I am thinking more along sanctions and crippling fines - European union style - just a bit more aggressive.

    To be honest, I believe like any other issue of socioeconomic justice, the solutions of the problem faced by tech consumers too, lie in campaign contribution reforms.
     
    desertlap likes this.
  9. lovelaptops

    lovelaptops My friends call me Jeff Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,377
    Likes Received:
    835
    Trophy Points:
    131
    Are you living inside my head? Seriously, you really do get it. How do we spread the word - beyond the handful of TPCR readers reached here?!! Next post should at least be a new Off-Topic thread, ok?
     
    siddhartth likes this.
  10. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,512
    Likes Received:
    1,660
    Trophy Points:
    181
    I'm as much a free market guy as anyone, but I also think government does have a role and actually can spur innovation as well.

    The automobile industry is a great example where the ever tightening CAFE standards has led not only to better gas mileage, but better more reliable engines and even arguably to the creation of electrics.

    Same thing applies to things like airbags and collision detection systems. I have an uncle that has worked his entire life for his states highway patrol. The carnage from a late 70s early 80's high speed crash was much more often fatal than they are now. People don't realize it but with a modern 2010 era car, you are almost twice as likely to walk away from a 60 MPH crash as you were in a 1990 era car.
     

Share This Page