Is Linux Really An Alternative To Windows...?

Discussion in 'Windows 10' started by Steve S, Jul 4, 2018.

  1. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Well, I finally hacked last year's version of Windows 10 (version 1703) into a shape where everything seems to work without snags or spying or faulty Windows Ink drivers. -In fact, I *just* finished getting completely fed up with the most recent version of Win10 which came on a newly acquired (used) Dell laptop. -The fan kept spinning up whenever I'd walk away for more than 10 minutes and my router light would go crazy with activity.

    When I sat back down and touched the mouse, everything stopped.

    You know the process monitor which comes with Windows? The one which shows a real-time listing of what programs and processes are pulling CPU cycles? Did you know that you cannot get it to record that stuff over time? Well you can't. -Being able to scroll through a timeline to see what the elves were doing while you were sleeping seems like a fairly obvious and useful feature. There are many comments out there in web-search land indicating that this is a commonly shared opinion. But Microsoft doesn't provide that kind of tool unless you super-dig around and learn a bunch of complicated things.

    So I spent a whole day using obscure developer tools and going through instructional videos and documents learning about stacks and threads, just trying to work out what the hell was going on secretly in the background of my computer when I looked away.

    I made some progress. I found a bunch of sneaky, CPU-hogging items, but it wasn't clear what the hell they were and what they were doing. I don't know if they were malware, Microsoft Big Brother processes, 'helpful' search indexers and malware filtering, or just badly written leaky code from various drivers. After a heroic effort to tame or kill them, and totally failing, I finally got fed up and wiped the whole goddamned drive and cloned the old Win10 system from my old computer which I'd spent months whipping into shape. It was easier with last year's Windows 10 version. Many of the tricks I used then have been disabled in today's Win10. Anyway, all of this took about 3 days of nonsense and fiddling, but I got a working system finally.

    Now when I walk away from the computer, it quiets down rather than heats up.

    (I also spent an evening changing all my security passwords and personal information, just in case. That's a LONG process, boy! Pretty much takes a whole evening.)

    I can promise you.., until the next, NEXT generation of hardware requires that I beat my brains out with OS trash, I'm staying pat where I am.

    If Linux were to provide me with the next solution, one which runs the best drawing software and drives my tablet hardware, I'd gladly jump ship. I'm not holding my breath, though.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2018
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  2. WillAdams

    WillAdams Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Yeah, I really wish Cenon or Inkscape or GraviT were more usable. Curious what will happen w/ the latter now that Corel has bought them.

    I keep thinking I should try Krita as well.

    Oh well, back to 3D modeling in OpenSCAD and coaxing METAPOST to create PDFs/SVG files.
     
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  3. rlx

    rlx Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Linux is a solid OS and is good for fast interactive applications. For instance I have adapted a sound visualization app to both Linux an Windows and I still can't get as good results in Windows as I can get in Linux. Linux would be an ideal tablet OS if it came with the Windows handwriting TabTip panel but I don't believe Linux has the equivalent of TabTip yet with the good handwriting recognition.

    I have started using Linux at a time when Windows was still unstable and Linux has been a very solid development platform right from the start. However I now find that Linux requires more maintenance work than Windows does; I am getting older now.

    I have never seen Linux as an alternative to Windows; I need them both. In fact all of the GNU software runs on Windows within the Cygwin environment. Many Linux programs run very well on Windows as stand alone apps while the converse is not true. That is why I run them all: Windows7 on the TabletPC's, Windows 10 and Linux on the desktop and Android and IOS on the phone and the iPad!

    Enjoy.
     
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