ipad pro vs. cintiq pro 24 vs. others

Discussion in 'What Tablet PC Should I Buy?' started by anima, May 20, 2021.

  1. anima

    anima Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Hello, I am trying to go paperless by re-writing all my university/highschool lecture notes into PDF using adobe illustrator. I have tried other apps but they don't work as well as illustrator. I am wanting to re-write mainly science and math lectures notes which consists of diagrams, formulas, illustrations and paragraphs of writing. I only want vectors, I dont want bitmap/raster

    I want a tablet which as the lowest latency time/response rate when writing paragraphs, has the lowest parallax and can keep up with strokes as I write. I also want something that will not have/minimal jitterness when stroking slowly or minimal lagging when stroking quickly (sounds wrong but just bear with me).

    I do not care about ergonomics, shortcut keys or whatever...that isn't important to me. I am going strictly for performance. If I need additional functionality I will find ways to adapt. So anyway, which tablet display in anyone's experience would you recommend for the above ??

    thank you..
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2021
  2. darkmagistric

    darkmagistric Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    An iPad Pro would serve those needs. Especially since they just recently brought Adobe Illustrator to the iPad. I’m not sure how well it runs, lord knows photoshops initial iPad release was anything but smooth, but in terms of pen Specs, the Apple Pencil 2 is one of the fastest and most accurate.

    But for Windows, your best option would be the Galaxy Book Pro 360, or if you can still find it, last years Galaxy Book Flex. Both use Samsung’s S-Pen which is Wacom EMR, and it’s superior to most every other Windows device which largely use Wacom AES or Microsoft MPP. In my opinion the Samsung S-Pen is Superior to the Apple Pencil 2.

    now technically the Pro Pen 2 in Wacoms Cintiqs and Mobile Studio Pros are superior to both the SPen and the Apple Pencil, but Wacoms devices have so many more shortcomings, and the performance the S-Pen will give is mostly indistinguishable from the Pro Pen 2.
     
  3. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Holy cow!

    Amazingly, I don't think even at this gleaming point in the "Future!!!" is what you are proposing quite possible yet.

    We have talking computers and video phones and self-driving cars, but our display tech is lagging behind our sci-fi in pretty big ways.

    But we're closer for sure.

    I'd recommend a touch-enabled Wacom Cintiq (or a Dell Canvas 27 if you can still find one) connected to a powerful computer for your desk, coupled with a second screen for sit-up-straight reading, BUT (and this is big), enabled with a touch interface so you can drag documents around. Having to switch between a pen and a mouse between screens is lame and breaks the cognitive flow. Being able to use your finger across the two screens is intuitive.

    I like the Dell because the Palm Rejection is pretty much flawless, so long as you're holding the pen in one hand, and there's a handy hardware button you can press to turn off touch when it gets in the way.

    -I'm sure others can recommend portable document solutions. Software is a big part of things, and again, others can chime in.

    I think you might also find that you can scan your old lecture notes and have some smarty-pants software turn it into vectors for you, and even interpret your hand writing. That's pretty advanced nowadays.

    Whatever the case... I wouldn't throw out your bookshelf just yet. Paper is still king, especially for reading docs. It's easier on the eyes.
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2021
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  4. doobiedoobiedum

    doobiedoobiedum Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I've not tried them myself but what about e-ink readers that come with a stylus? Their display is designed to be very easy on the eye and are they usually designed to allow you to annotate pdf files.

    On the PC front - illustrator is very CPU intensive and you'll need something with a good fan to keep the laptop cool to the touch. I often do a lot of drawing with thousands of individual strokes (including pressure settings) and things get pretty hot, pretty quickly. If portability is king - then the newest Samsung 13 inch 360 Galaxy Pro mainly because its CPU will probably cope best with all that number crunching.
    One alternative on the desktop would be something like a Mac Mini (if you go Apple) attached to a drawing monitor screen like a Wacom One or a Huion 4K 16 inch - or if you go PC - something like a gaming laptop (they are designed around CPU strengths) attached to a Wacom One or a Huion 4K 16 inch. The Mac Mini is the cheapest Apple M1 device and will allow you to attach a more writing friendly screen than the iPad Pro.

    Illustrator will easily deal with huge files having a ton of strokes - I'm not sure whether anything but the very latest M1 iPads will cope with very large vector documents otherwise the iPad Pro with illustrator should be pretty good - just make sure you get a paper-type screen protector or you're quickly going to hate the slippery glass surface of an ipad pro.

    If you can, I'd try before you buy - put a huge illustrator document onto your drop-box or USB (won't work on an iPad) and transfer your biggest handwritten document onto the device and test it. Understandably not everyone will have illustrator installed but this is quite an expensive purchase.
     
  5. anima

    anima Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I think you might also find that you can scan your old lecture notes and have some smarty-pants software turn it into vectors for you, and even interpret your hand writing. That's pretty advanced nowadays.
    I've tried that before with numerous apps and they all mess up and screw up the strokes which hence why I want to a hardware and software type of solution. I still believe it's WORLDS away from the type and style of my handwriting that I do...especially with math lol
    1. But for Windows, your best option would be the Galaxy Book Pro 360, or if you can still find it, last years Galaxy Book Flex.
    2. (or a Dell Canvas 27 if you can still find one)
    In canada, Galaxy Book Pro 360 is not available and somehow Dell Canvas 27 has been discontinued and apparently its old technology even though it has a 27" screen

    coupled with a second screen for sit-up-straight reading, BUT (and this is big), enabled with a touch interface so you can drag documents around. Having to switch between a pen and a mouse between screens is lame and breaks the cognitive flow. Being able to use your finger across the two screens is intuitive.
    I totally get that but my budget is $2500 CAD in that ballpark and touch screens and/or a second screen isn't really a priority for me. I am mainly after adobe illustrator

    Whatever the case... I wouldn't throw out your bookshelf just yet. Paper is still king, especially for reading docs. It's easier on the eyes
    yes, i agree paper is the king. Althought, paperlike type of feature for ipad pro seems like a viable, useful option in a fully featured laminated pen displays, I like that idea. Somehow, something feels like im steering toward a M1 ipad pro but if only stores would open up I could go test it out compared to other wacom or huion pen displays...this is the biggest clogg right now this crappy pandemic and our mediocre government

    I've just read that the response time is just to activate the beginning of a pen stroke but the latency time is what determines how fast the stroke information is updated from the user to the software. So, now basically I'm looking for the fastest response rate if this determines how quickly the strokes will follow the pen tip and with the highest accuracy. I've read that the ipad pro coupled with apple pencil 2 have a latency time of 9 ms with 120 Hz refresh rate.....however with pen displays like wacom, huion and xp-pen the latency rate of 266 seems to be the highest...Is there something like a wacom or huion pen display which matches something like a ipad pro ?
     
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