ipad mini 5 on the way

Discussion in 'Apple/iOS' started by Cuberdon75, Oct 24, 2018.

  1. lovelaptops

    lovelaptops My friends call me Jeff Senior Member

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    Thanks for the always thorough, reasoned information. Until you brought up the point about about up to 50% superiority in low signal environments, I was going to call it within a range that doesn't get me too excited, but I find my LTE signal on my Pixel 3XL with TMobile service in the US (and with previous Android "flagships" in the US) is nearly always only 1-2 bars, so it would seem that the 50% difference is probably the norm with most poor antennae and poor cell coverage. Vive le difference!
     
  2. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Glad to be any help I can.
    T-mobile is an interesting issue in itself, In a few markets, like Phoenix AZ for instance, they have class leading LTE.

    OTOH I wonder about their 5G rollout, primarily because they spent so much so recently on upping their LTE infrastructure I cant see them turning right around and investing in 5G in the same places.

    This may be Sprints single biggest opportunity, as they lagged in 4G compared to AT&T or Verizon. Of course with the proposed merger with T-mobile, who knows what will happen.
     
  3. darkmagistric

    darkmagistric Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    As a former Verizon Owner with a Note 5......and now a T-Mobile Customer with a Note 8....I can directly attest the NYC/NJ Market is pretty damn good for T-mobile. Ironically there are a few spots in NYC where I would have crap coverage with Verizon, that are better covered with T-Mobile. Like a few bars and clubs I would visit that would be complete no signals for Verizon......I do sometimes wonder is maybe if it was the Phone itself (Note 5 vs Note 8) or the provider change. But T-mobile's superior international coverage (and prices) will no doubt keep me loyal to T-mobile for the near future.
     
  4. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    You experience matches what some of our customers have told us. Now more than ever "the best" wireless carrier is highly dependent on where you live and work.
    In the 3g days, it was pretty much AT&T in big cities and Verizon everywhere else now not so much.

    For whatever reason AT&T and Verizon seem to be in an arms race in the neighborhood our offices are in and 5g is abundant (for a radius of about 4 city blocks). But boy is it fast if you are in line of sight of one of the access points.
     
  5. lovelaptops

    lovelaptops My friends call me Jeff Senior Member

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    Does that amount to anything more than proof of concept? Not only is 4 city blocks a tiny area, but line of sight is very limiting. About how fast is it under ideal circumstances - you pick the device? One of my questions about 5G in general. Except in rare circumstances, where ideal speeds can be achieved and there is a great need for very large downloads and/or uploads, what is presently so urgent about the interim rollouts in a few areas? I have gigbit wired/wifi ISP service - have for 2 yrs - in my home/home office and kinda fair 4Glte for when power goes out and there are very few uses for which, say, 50MB/down vs. 600 (via wifi) is even a noticeable difference.

    I can appreciate the benefit of society-wide or even industry-wide 5G at gigabit+ speeds will make many things possible that rarely are today (in such fields as telemedicine, to name but one of 1000s), but since most of industry and commerce operates in a wired environment and few consumer wireless needs are such that 5G speeds would be "life-changing," I question what societal or even industrial importance 5G deployment in spotty (largely concentrated urban areas) are game changers. "Immensely cool" is the best I can muster by way of enthusiasm, even for my own uses. My sense of the marginal benefits of the next 2-4 yrs of 5G deployment in the US is further tempered by my expectation that most 5G deployments will be in urban areas, where 4G LTE is performing fairly well. Also, I can see that 5G deployment will be truly life-changing where there is presently no broadband, say in Africa, where China is investing 100s of billions of dollars putting infrastructure in places that have virtually no Internet access today.

    TL/DR: What's really all the fuss about early 5G deployments over the next few years in areas of the US that already have great wired/wifi access and pretty decent 4G/LTE?
     
  6. dellaster

    dellaster Technomad Senior Member

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    Well, my friend, what really excites the economic powers that be is real-time tracking of individuals wearing AR glasses and serving up on-the-spot advertising to them. Some cute cartoon/anime character (or sexy woman) will come up to them and say, “Here! Right here on your left in the window! Buy it NOW!!!” :p
     
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  7. lovelaptops

    lovelaptops My friends call me Jeff Senior Member

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    Methinks you've made my point!
     
  8. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Well it's definitely early days. The thoughts I have is that it took a long time for the transition to 3g from 2g (and even that was accelerated more than it would have by the government due to HDTV) By comparison the switch to LTE was much faster and I anticipate that the transition to 5g will be quicker than most think because both the government and business see great upside to 5g and will drive it.

    It is true that in some areas they have lagged considerably and that wont change right away, but i think for example you will see some of the 3g laggards go directly to 5g.

    The key thing that's different from a 5g network is the mesh nature which solves a lot of tower type issues. In remote areas the speed may not be all that impressive, but it's more a matter of access where there wasn't before.

    This is just my feelings and hunches but there you go,
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2019
  9. dellaster

    dellaster Technomad Senior Member

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    Okay, this article explains why there’s 5G hope for non-metro areas. It’s from back in December and I wonder why none of the other 5G articles I’ve read mention the rural “low-band” US version as well as the “millimeter-wave” version for high-density population areas.

    https://www.pcmag.com/news/365565/what-will-5g-do-for-rural-areas

    A sample of the info:

    “The multi-gigabit speeds and massive capacity you hear about with 5G is by and large an urban phenomenon, driven by the huge bandwidths of millimeter-wave spectrum, which doesn't travel very far. Rural areas will get a form of 5G called "low-band" or "sub-6" 5G, which will have less capacity but still have extremely low latency and be able to work with massive networks of industrial sensors.”​

    Upgrading—or rather adding to—existing LTE towers with a lesser (but still improved) 5G capability makes a WHOLE lot more sense than tacking up millimeter-wave transceivers every square 100m (or whatever) throughout the non-metro US. I never believed that scenario was credible.

    2272E218-C687-4E28-977E-0911B42990B1.jpeg
    Yeah, nail 5G transceivers throughout the millions of square miles of National Forests? Not gonna happen! 3G/4G tower coverage is surprisingly not bad nowadays compared to a decade ago. Just add 5G “low-band” to those towers and we’re a long ways towards even better connectivity for the rest of us.
    For the first time I’m in a positive mood about 5G! :thumbsup:

    BTW, the reason I looked up “low-band” rural 5G for the US is because it was mentioned on MacBreak Weekly today. It was in reference to Apple needing both kinds on their phone next year, or rather all three kinds (Europe will use an in between “mid-band” version). Glad I was listening.
     
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  10. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Wish I'd seen this.
    Additionally did they mention the mesh nature of these new "towers" ? They could use each other for a connection (albeit with hits to performance) without even needing a wired connection. One of the European companies is even working on a solar powered unit that wouldn't need an electricity line either.
     
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