ipad mini 5 on the way

Discussion in 'Apple/iOS' started by Cuberdon75, Oct 24, 2018.

  1. dellaster

    dellaster Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    No complaints on mine. And it might seem a small thing, but the popularity of the iPad & Pencil means there are a lot of 3rd-party accessories to choose from, including custom skins.

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  2. siddhartth

    siddhartth Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Actually, Apple uses much slower and older LtE and modems from qualcomm, Where as the android smartphones have much more updated components.
     
  3. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Actually I'm talking real world vs. theoretical. And for the record, Apple is using Intel Modems. You are correct that in strictly controlled lab situations the Qualcomm modems are faster. But out in the wild, getting and holding and delivering a signal is a bit different.
    And to your point if we limit it to the iPhone than yes the intel modem is not as good but the whole system especially antenna and housing make a bigger difference than people realize.

    Of course Apple would like to have the best of both and might be partially why they settled with Qualcomm

    PS: The LTE King at least in our testing is the Samsung Galaxy Book 2.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2019
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  4. lovelaptops

    lovelaptops My friends call me Jeff Senior Member

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    Can you approximate the real world download speed for iPad vs, say, iPhoneXx, or some other "standard" of your choice? Curious, would this apply to all currently sold iPads, even the lowly 9.7"?
     
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  5. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Given the zillion factors that go in to actual speed it makes more sense to talk in terms of percentage than in raw mbps numbers

    Based on the data we have, in aggregate the current iPads including the 9.7 are between 10 and 30% faster at any given physical location compared to current iphones and about 15-35% faster than most android phones or tablets.

    More importantly in areas where the overall signal level is low (say 1-2 bars for simplicity) the difference is even greater with the iPads being as much as 50% faster in those cases.

    One additional note; The current iPad Air 3 and the new mini haven't been available long enough for us to have a sufficient dataset yet though I expect that it will be similar to the ipad pro 11 range.

    2nd additional note; I mentioned the Samsung Galaxy Book 2 as being the current king of LTE. So one anecdotal location specific example in Arizona. In this case with Verizon as the carrier
    iPhone X- 15 mbps down- 4.4 mbps up
    iPad pro 11- 18 mbps down 5.3 mbps up
    Galaxy Book 2 18.5 mbps down 6.1 mbps up.

    Of course you will get different numbers in the same location if you use AT&T or Sprint. Part of my teams job is also recommending a carrier as well as a device.

    FWIW: I think i mentioned this before, but Apple seems to be the only company that actually designs enclosure specific antennas for their devices. e.g. different antennas in an iPad vs. an iPhone.

    I think the reason they do this goes back to the iPhone 4 "you're holding it wrong" debacle. After that, Apple hired a ton of radio and antenna experts .

    Samsung seems to put the exact same antennas in their android LTE tablets as they do in their a series phones. The GB2 seems to be an outlier here
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2019
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  6. lovelaptops

    lovelaptops My friends call me Jeff Senior Member

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    Thanks for the always thorough, reasoned information. Until you brought up the point about about up to 50% superiority in low signal environments, I was going to call it within a range that doesn't get me too excited, but I find my LTE signal on my Pixel 3XL with TMobile service in the US (and with previous Android "flagships" in the US) is nearly always only 1-2 bars, so it would seem that the 50% difference is probably the norm with most poor antennae and poor cell coverage. Vive le difference!
     
  7. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Glad to be any help I can.
    T-mobile is an interesting issue in itself, In a few markets, like Phoenix AZ for instance, they have class leading LTE.

    OTOH I wonder about their 5G rollout, primarily because they spent so much so recently on upping their LTE infrastructure I cant see them turning right around and investing in 5G in the same places.

    This may be Sprints single biggest opportunity, as they lagged in 4G compared to AT&T or Verizon. Of course with the proposed merger with T-mobile, who knows what will happen.
     
  8. darkmagistric

    darkmagistric Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    As a former Verizon Owner with a Note 5......and now a T-Mobile Customer with a Note 8....I can directly attest the NYC/NJ Market is pretty damn good for T-mobile. Ironically there are a few spots in NYC where I would have crap coverage with Verizon, that are better covered with T-Mobile. Like a few bars and clubs I would visit that would be complete no signals for Verizon......I do sometimes wonder is maybe if it was the Phone itself (Note 5 vs Note 8) or the provider change. But T-mobile's superior international coverage (and prices) will no doubt keep me loyal to T-mobile for the near future.
     
  9. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    You experience matches what some of our customers have told us. Now more than ever "the best" wireless carrier is highly dependent on where you live and work.
    In the 3g days, it was pretty much AT&T in big cities and Verizon everywhere else now not so much.

    For whatever reason AT&T and Verizon seem to be in an arms race in the neighborhood our offices are in and 5g is abundant (for a radius of about 4 city blocks). But boy is it fast if you are in line of sight of one of the access points.
     
  10. lovelaptops

    lovelaptops My friends call me Jeff Senior Member

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    Does that amount to anything more than proof of concept? Not only is 4 city blocks a tiny area, but line of sight is very limiting. About how fast is it under ideal circumstances - you pick the device? One of my questions about 5G in general. Except in rare circumstances, where ideal speeds can be achieved and there is a great need for very large downloads and/or uploads, what is presently so urgent about the interim rollouts in a few areas? I have gigbit wired/wifi ISP service - have for 2 yrs - in my home/home office and kinda fair 4Glte for when power goes out and there are very few uses for which, say, 50MB/down vs. 600 (via wifi) is even a noticeable difference.

    I can appreciate the benefit of society-wide or even industry-wide 5G at gigabit+ speeds will make many things possible that rarely are today (in such fields as telemedicine, to name but one of 1000s), but since most of industry and commerce operates in a wired environment and few consumer wireless needs are such that 5G speeds would be "life-changing," I question what societal or even industrial importance 5G deployment in spotty (largely concentrated urban areas) are game changers. "Immensely cool" is the best I can muster by way of enthusiasm, even for my own uses. My sense of the marginal benefits of the next 2-4 yrs of 5G deployment in the US is further tempered by my expectation that most 5G deployments will be in urban areas, where 4G LTE is performing fairly well. Also, I can see that 5G deployment will be truly life-changing where there is presently no broadband, say in Africa, where China is investing 100s of billions of dollars putting infrastructure in places that have virtually no Internet access today.

    TL/DR: What's really all the fuss about early 5G deployments over the next few years in areas of the US that already have great wired/wifi access and pretty decent 4G/LTE?
     
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