Intel 7th Gen CPUs On Schedule for Later This Year

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Steve S, May 31, 2016.

  1. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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  2. bloodycape

    bloodycape Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Pentium Gold? Will there also be Celeron Silver?
     
  3. sonichedgehog360

    sonichedgehog360 Editor-in-Chief of TechAndTiny Senior Member

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    And Core i3 and i5 Platinum? And Core i7 and i9 Rhodium?
     
  4. sonichedgehog360

    sonichedgehog360 Editor-in-Chief of TechAndTiny Senior Member

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    Ruh roh... If you thought the Skylake-X-based Core i7-7800X got hot, the Core i7-8700K is a beast totally of its own. Do keep in mind also that though the 7700K draws tiny bit less power, it gets substantially hotter (5-15 degrees Celsius) than the Ryzen 7 1800X. This is because Intel insists on using an inferior thermal interface material (TIM) between the die and the package heatsink instead of soldering the die to the package. So you can only imagine that liquid cooling is highly recommended for the 8700K unless you want to experience thermal throttling.

    [​IMG]

    Also:
    “Temperatures: As stated earlier in the methodology, we used the NZXT Kraken X62; an all-in-one liquid CPU cooler with a dual-fan 280mm radiator. However, the 8700K still got pretty hot. At idle, the CPU sat at a mild 32 degrees Celsius and went up to 78 degrees Celsius under load during our runs of X264. With using the 5.0GHz overclock profile, it reached 86 degrees Celsius under load in X264, which is considered higher than desirable.”

    Source:
    https://www.gamespot.com/articles/i...-performance-leap-/1100-6453799/#Temperatures

    Imagine how badly this processor will throttle in a mass market product with more standard, economy air cooling from the likes of HP or Dell. To be clear, the above is a premium liquid cooling system and the processor is clearly demanding even on that. For ordinary cases, I could see PC manufacturers either releasing products anyway knowing of the thermal throttling problems and very potentially diminished life of the processor anyway, or them avoiding this model of processor altogether.

    To conclude:

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    To illustrate 8700K's temperature defiencies, here is a non-synthetic gaming test mapping out tempeature while using the Alphacool Eisbear 420. Per the manufacturer, "[t]he Alphacool Eisbaer 420mm is the biggest and strongest expandable CPU AIO worldwide." Naturally, therefore, most other AIOs would fare far worse in this test configuration. Higher workloads such as video encoding and synthetic testing will be naturally higher. Those higher workloads will result in even higher temperatures in cramped ventilation or with air cooling.

    [​IMG]


    From Gamespot:


    Temperatures
    As stated earlier in the methodology, we used the NZXT Kraken X62; an all-in-one liquid CPU cooler with a dual-fan 280mm radiator. However, the 8700K still got pretty hot. At idle, the CPU sat at a mild 32 degrees Celsius and went up to 78 degrees Celsius under load during our runs of X264. With using the 5.0GHz overclock profile, it reached 86 degrees Celsius under load in X264, which is considered higher than desirable.
    Let's break this down. At stock voltage and clock settings, the 8700K reached a temperature of 78 degrees Celsius. This was again with a premium AIO, NZXT Kraken X62, which is a $150+ solution with a 280mm radiator. By comparison, according to the Amazon reviews of the X62, the 7700K reaches maximum temperatures of the high 50 degrees Celsius with the same cooler. This is a twenty degree Celsius increase in temperature over the 7700K. Expect 80 to 90 temperatures with throttling with more normal liquid cooling solutions. Beware of throttling, possibly thermal shutdown and heat damage (as has already been reported with X299) if attempting air cooling.

    In short, this is frankly disappointing for what is the flagship of Intel's mainstream processor line. I could understand this if this were an HEDT processor in their X299 line, but it is not. There were reports of overheating with 7700K in DIY systems and mass market builds due to users and manufacturers using standard air cooling (e.g. the Cooler Master Hyper 212). This common theme of overheating will only worsen and become more commonplace for 8700K due to its added 20 degree Celsius disadvantage over its predecessor.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2017
  5. sonichedgehog360

    sonichedgehog360 Editor-in-Chief of TechAndTiny Senior Member

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  6. cspaint

    cspaint Pen Pal - Newbie

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  7. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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  8. sonichedgehog360

    sonichedgehog360 Editor-in-Chief of TechAndTiny Senior Member

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    If I understood the gist of the earnings call correctly, these 10nm chips are only engineering samples and not retail products. Minimally, that means typically another 6 to 12 months so manufacturers have ample time to prototype and verify their products before releasing them to market.
     
  9. cspaint

    cspaint Pen Pal - Newbie

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  10. sonichedgehog360

    sonichedgehog360 Editor-in-Chief of TechAndTiny Senior Member

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    [​IMG]

    Biggest takeaway is this latest public roadmap that comes with this news. This confirms what I said beforehand about the Liliputing article that purported a 10nm chip was being made by the end of this year. This confirms that this was in reference to test or pre-production engineering samples, not production models. In fact, this roadmap clearly indicates as much: risk production of 10nm does not begin until early to mid Q2 2018 at the earliest. Add to this that Intel traditionally does risk production only with their low power Core M/Y CPUs. As was the case with Broadwell in 2014, there is also the lingering possibility that first generation 10nm may also skip desktop for the most part due to low yields.

    What is especially alarming for Intel is that 7nm is not even likely going to be coming until late 2020 or early 2021 since this their latest public roadmap still omits it. This is not factoring in Intel's well-documented history of pushing back dates on their public roadmaps, which makes this situation look even more dire. This is all while key competitors GlobalFoundaries (AMD's primary production partner), TSMC and Samsung already have 7nm lined up for 2018 and 2019. I have said all of this before but with their roadmaps lagging this far behind the curve, the writing is already on the wall that Intel is going to drop off from their number one spot in the world of computing--plan on it.

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    Last edited: Nov 2, 2017
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