I think I'm just not destined to have Windows 10 on my T901

Discussion in 'Fujitsu' started by Selofain, Jul 26, 2016.

  1. rcxAsh

    rcxAsh Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I know right? I wonder if it's also partially due to the relative complexity of the NVIDIA Optimus solution. My sister had a Windows 8 computer with an NVIDIA GeForce card and Intel graphics and when it updated to Windows 8.1, she lost the ability to use the GeForce card as well. Actually at first, she was always getting a blank screen until we sorted out drivers using an external display attached with a USB graphics adapter. But after that, trying to run anything with the NVIDIA card would always run with the Intel one... Perhaps if it was 100% pure NVIDIA (or 100% pure Intel), it would be easier...

    Nevertheless, I found a listing of NVIDIA drivers here:
    http://www.nvidia.com/object/quadro-branch-history-table.html

    The driver that I tried above in NVIDIA's numbering scheme is "R331 U1 (331.65)". I found that you can search the NVIDIA website for the driver numbers and find the download pages that way (as Google may also point to packages from other manufacturers). I also noticed that there are different pages for the same driver versions for GeForce and Quadro. Older versions also split Quadro into Desktop and Notebook.

    Based on a quick run through of a few of these, it looks to me that the first official Windows 10 drivers started coming out with R352 U2 (353.30) - at least, it looked like the version just before that, R352 U1 (353.06) was only listed for Windows 7/8/8.1.

    Interestingly, starting with that version, there are actually multiple downloads available for the same driver version but for different operating systems. For example, R352 U2 (353.30) has separate downloads for Windows 7/8/8.1, and Windows 10. The contents of the installation packages are different too. Some files are binary different, and there are also files that exist in one package, but not in the other, and vice versa.

    I'll have to try to setup my T901 to boot from a second hard drive to make switching between my Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 disks easier for testing out some of these driver combinations. Hopefully that is possible with a SATA tray in the expansion bay.
     
  2. rcxAsh

    rcxAsh Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Ok, another try! I worked through trying various driver versions and the latest one that I was able to install was 348.40. This was one of the last Windows 8.1 drivers before Windows 10 drivers became officially available as far as I can tell. There was one more release version after that, 353.06, which would not work properly (yellow icon in Device Manager). Newer drivers, for Windows 10, after that, always exhibited the freezing issue (freeze when attempting to activate the NVIDIA GPU).

    348.40, however, appears to work properly. I tried loading up the two games I used for verification earlier (Race the Sun and Crysis 2) and this time, they both appeared to use the NVIDIA GPU!

    So, so far, the conclusion seems to be: use the Intel drivers from Fujitsu, and use the NVIDIA Quadro driver version 348.40 from NVIDIA. Here is the direct link to the download page: http://www.nvidia.com/download/driverResults.aspx/90919/en-us

    I think I might try to make the jump to Windows 10 now. May need a bit more testing to get setup right, but now at least my biggest concern appears to be resolvable. (Hopefully not speaking too soon here...)

    Here is a screenshot of Crysis 2 loaded showing the GPU under load:
    [​IMG]
     

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  3. Selofain

    Selofain Chronic Lurker

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    That's some fantastic testing, thanks for doing all that! Too bad I didn't find that Nvidia page- I couldn't decipher the numbering scheme nor find older drivers without it. And downloading the latest Win8 driver only got me a "your hardware isn't compatible" complaint.
     
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  4. rcxAsh

    rcxAsh Scribbler - Standard Member

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    No problem, I never thought to try Windows 10 again until you mentioned you had it working! Your tip to get the drivers setup while disconnected from WiFi really helped. It really feels like a whole different computer now. It's amazing how big of a different software makes to the user experience. Windows 8.1 was not bad, but 10 just feels more polished. Hopefully this will give this 5 year old T901 some further lease on life.
     
  5. Starlight5

    Starlight5 I'm a cat. What else is there to say, really?

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    @Selofain @rcxAsh does NVS 4200M really make a lot of difference vs HD 3000 on T901? I thought they were almost the same in terms of performance.
     
  6. rcxAsh

    rcxAsh Scribbler - Standard Member

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    @Starlight5, by today's standards, neither of them are really great in performance, but when compared directly to each other, the NVS 4200M does out-perform the Intel HD 3000.

    As a quick comparison, I ran the 3DMark Cloud Gate benchmark twice (once for each graphics adapter) and got the following scores on my machine:

    Intel HD 3000: 1683
    NVIDIA NVS 4200M: 2939


    In the graphics score specifically (I guess not taking into account the physics tests):

    Intel HD 3000: 1583
    NVIDIA NVS 4200M: 3235


    So neither of these are really great scores if you go and look at 3DMark Cloud Gate scores from actual gaming machines, but it does make a difference when comparing the two against each other (NVS 4200M's score is double the HD 3000's!).
     
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  7. Selofain

    Selofain Chronic Lurker

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    The only tangible differences I see are when using Photoshop or the 3D model in Clip Studio Paint. On Intel, the background outside the canvas flashed every time I moved the canvas, and it stopped once I had Photoshop only use the NVS. In CSP, the 3D model was noticeably laggier to adjust on Intel instead of NVS.

    There's probably differences in 3D modeling programs as well, but my CPU was such a chokepoint that I never saw any difference. (3D modeling is hard and I don't get it. :( I've given up on it until I get better hardware.)
     
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