I have a Cintiq 22HD, thinking of getting a cube i7, help?

Discussion in 'What Tablet PC Should I Buy?' started by Maria76, Aug 4, 2016.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Maria76

    Maria76 Pen Pal - Newbie

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Hello. I was wondering if someone could help me here. I am a hobbyist who likes to draw, illustration for children's book specifically. I have a cintiq 22 HD, though I admit I haven't been able to use it a lot lately due to basically having little time. I am the kind of girl that likes to sit on the sofa or in bed to draw, so my Cintiq doesn't really do that for me. I cannot afford a cintiq companion at the moment, and it does actually sound a bit heavy, plus lots of other problems which for the price sound demoralising. So I like the sound of the cube i7. I use linux, and use programs like gimp, krita, or mypaint (I think similar to artrage? ). I would not need to run heavy programs such as photoshop (or open software equivalents). I am happy with a simple drawing/sketching program and then to take my files to my desktop /cintiq if needed. I am aware the tablet has windows, I will let that be and most probably in the future install Debian on it, as I've seen someone do on an Cube But this isn't my issue at the moment (she says, most probably will be cursing windows after 5 minutes).

    Anyway, my questions are. I have no idea how these type of devices feel. I don't like normal tablets, like an android tablet, to draw on. They obviously don't have wacom technology or sensitivity, and the Cube does. How will it feel for me? Will it feel similar to being on my cintiq if I use a simple drawing program? Will I be able to sketch similar to as if I was on paper/on the cintiq? I am really clueless, and I just can't get an idea from watching youtube videos, as the videos I see are more like inking. For my type of purpose, would the 2GB be enough, or should I go straight for a 4GB? Will my cintiq pencil work on it? Thank you for any info you can give me X
     
  2. Shogmaster

    Shogmaster Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,204
    Likes Received:
    1,466
    Trophy Points:
    231
    The biggest difference will be other than sheer size, is lack of tilt and more noticeable edge drift and jitter due to the small size of the screen.

    Tilt is no big deal since most people don't use brushes that rely on tilt, but edge drift and jitter is a legit issue.

    You have edge drift and jitter on your 22HD as well, but it will not be as pronounced as a smalll EMR device like the Cube i7.

    Also you don't worry about orientation change on your 22HD messing up your tip calibration but you do have to deal with it on the Cube i7. One orientation might be perfectly calibrated but as soon as you rotate, the alignment of the cursor tip will be off.

    That rotation issue was the biggest reason I ditched EMR for AES happily when Wacom made AES available to ODMs.

    Also might be an issue for you if you have old eyes like me is the extremely high DPI of new mobile screens. 22HD only has like 120ish DPI, but Cube i7 is probably double of that. Using native res without scaling can be difficult on apps that doesn't adjust UI elements for small DPIs.

    I'm not big on Linux app world, so you should research how your favorite apps handle high DPI screens.

    Also, make sure Linux art apps are keyboard less operation friendly. Drawing on the couch will mean having a keyboard to do shortcuts can be out of reach. I like to use apps like Clip Studio Paint along with Wacom radial menu that helps me to navigate the app without a keyboard. Something tells me this would be difficult on Linux.

    I would suggest that you should look into getting a used Samsung Galaxy Note 2014 or Note 12.2 instead of your Cube i7 and use Android apps rather than trying to use Linux art apps that require you to use the keyboard.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Samsung-Gal...194948?hash=item20fd1880c4:g:3-UAAOSwBLlVcM3h
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2016
    thatcomicsguy and Maria76 like this.
  3. Maria76

    Maria76 Pen Pal - Newbie

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Thank you so much for your reply, its very informative and useful and given me food for thought on this tablet. I am happy generally with the differences, I never realised til this week that tablets could offer such an alternative to cintiqs. I generally do not like tablets, and would not use the cube to navigate or anything that is not to draw (should I purchase on). I think the size will be okay, I honestly am happy with it being on the small size. Of all you mention, the only thing that worries me in the high DPI, as I already have eye tiredness and strain. I think I would use the program MyPaint, so will look into who it handles that, it doesn't need a keyboard and is thought for exclusive tablet use so that would be good. I don't think I would go for the samsung as it doesn't have wacom technology. I don't think my pen would work though, my cintiq one, which is a downfall and adds to the cost (and me wondering if I do need another tablet) Torn, but more informed, thank you
     
  4. Maria76

    Maria76 Pen Pal - Newbie

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    6
    My head is all over the place, and I go from thinking that I won't get anything and make do with my cintiq, to looking again on what is on the market. I've found I keep going back again and again to motion tablets. I had never heard of them til this day, but there is something about them that stand out from the rest, and I like the artwork I see done on them. Plus there is what seems some good deals on second hand ones. The cube plus a stylus is a lot of money if I don't get it directly from China (more than 400 euros), The motion tablets are a bit bigger, 12 inches, and I have the feeling they would be easier on the eye?
     
  5. Leorica

    Leorica Pen Pal - Newbie

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    6
    I bought a Cube i7 stylus a few months back for drawing on and it was not ideal. I pretty much tried everything I could to get it to work well.
    In the end I started plugging in my regular tablet and that worked just fine.

    Here's why:
    1) Activation pressure. You have to press harder with your pen for your lines to register and you lose much of the range of pressure sensitivity that you ought to have.
    2) The tablet is heavy. I always end up resting it against something so I don't have to hold it for long.
    3) Heating. If you do try and hold the tablet it's going to be even more uncomfortable as the left side of the tablet gets really hot when in use.
    4) Most art applications do not work with the pen. Because it uses something called windows tablet API and not wintab. Programs like photoshop (all except the cc version) and paint tool SAI are unusable with the pen.
    5) Keyboard support. I like using shortcuts however the keyboard only works when the tablet is docked so a separate bluetooth keyboard is necessary to do this.
    6) Screen size. It's tricky to have a decent amount of space to draw when you have your tool palettes up. I'd minimise them but then I need to have shortcut keys available.
    7) Lack of a stand. You can't use a folding stand with this if you're using the keyboard dock. It's either/or unfortunately as the cover will need to removed for the keyboard to connect.

    As far as the OS goes the tablet PC works well with windows 10. It's fast and very responsive, booting up in just a few seconds. The battery life is good enough for me to take it to work without the charging cable. The screen is perfectly clear and crisp and there's no problems with viewing angles. It has great sound as well provided you use headphones as the built in speakers are terrible.

    So in conclusion I like it a lot as a portable laptop but it's not the surface replacement that I was hoping for.

    I think going for something with a bigger screen size, lighter weight and some full size USB ports would be a better option.
     
    thatcomicsguy and Maria76 like this.
  6. Maria76

    Maria76 Pen Pal - Newbie

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Thank you very much for your input. I feel I indeed made the best choice for me having read that. I didn't want a tablet for internet use, however good it is, so if drawing wasn't good it would have been useless to me. THey sound like very valid points and I'm sorry it didn't work out for you on the drawing side, at least you could get use out of it as a tablet.

     
  7. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,283
    Likes Received:
    2,337
    Trophy Points:
    231
    Just a little observation that might prove helpful:

    If you get a tablet, hang on to that Cintiq anyway.

    I do a lot of work on portable tablets and rely heavily on them; they're fantastic! But when it comes down to the crunch, all the sketches and doodles and ink works and such come together in the home studio.

    Without a dedicated studio machine mounted to a drafting board, I'd be severely limiting myself. I don't think any artist can do their best finals unless they're in a physical creation place with tools all set to the optimum angles and where the other distractions of the world are set aside. A good chair made to fit the drafting board is also important.

    I find I pick up on composition and flow problems that I somehow miss while working away from home.

    "Whoa! Her head is squashed! Was I drawing this while slouching or something?" (Yes.)
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2016
    Maria76 likes this.
  8. Maria76

    Maria76 Pen Pal - Newbie

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Yes, I do agree thatcomicguy. I don't think its got enough resolution for a final picture anyway, the LE1600 I mean (which I plan to baptise Lexy haha). Also what you say about a good chair. I wish I knew what a good chair was! When I got the cintiq, I had a lot of time to draw, and I spent excessive time using it, resulting in frightening back problems. I had a chiropractor at home that told me the chair looked good, but I get a lot of pain after using it. I am looking at a book on mindful posture, and I'm thinking of putting a stool with a wedge on it, and when I use the cintiq to stand up so often and stretch and move. For some odd reason I don't get problems when on the sofa, but I know that once I have Lexy the temptation to go mad drawing will be high, so I'll have to watch my posture there. So my plan is to do all sketching and preliminary drawings on the tablet, and then head to the desktop for the final picture. Still waiting for the unit, very impatiently I must add.
     
    thatcomicsguy likes this.
  9. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,283
    Likes Received:
    2,337
    Trophy Points:
    231
    Frigging back pain!

    Greats like Hayo Miyazaki described being plagued by it because he was constantly hunched over a drawing board and using his drawing hand out of balance with his not-drawing hand.

    One way to mitigate it, I found, is to have two monitors. The Cintiq, lying at 25 degrees or so is reserved primarily for drawing, not writing, not web surfing, not coding. Just drawing. -A second upright monitor at comfortable eye-level is for everything else.

    Nothing caused me stress on my back and neck muscles more than trying to use a Cintiq for regular computer stuff. -The worst was watching a video or something with my head tilted forward for an hour and a half!
     
    Maria76 likes this.
  10. Maria76

    Maria76 Pen Pal - Newbie

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    6
    I can only imagine the back problems a genius like Miyazaki has, I actually remember seeing a picture of him at work and he was very hunched. I do have my cintiq on an ergoarm but its far from perfect. I still think its too big to be honest, like a too big screen near my face, but still I will still need to use it with my desktop. I couldn't fit another monitor on my desk and the cintiq is so blooming big. My children (toddlers) still don't know its a cintiq, and not just a monitor, another monitor might make their mind ticks and wonder (I have nightmares about my twins getting real pencils and scraping a picture on the cintiq). To be fair 90% of the time my desktop is on its so they can watch nursery rhymes. I hardly get to go on it, for drawing or for normal use. But when they go school I do plan to get back on the horse! Thank you so much for all your advice Thatcomicsguy
     
    thatcomicsguy likes this.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page