HP Spectre Folio

Discussion in 'Hewlett Packard' started by Steve S, Oct 1, 2018.

  1. Evan Berry

    Evan Berry Pen Pal - Newbie

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    So now that I have owned and used extensively both models of the HP Spectre Folio with the AUO552D (quick ship and Best Buy) and AUO572D (custom build) displays I've come to the following suspicions. Dale is correct in that the BB store model and HP quick Ship (at least the current stock) are the AUO552D (supposed 2 watt displays). The custom order is in fact the AUO572D (suspected 1 watt display) model. What is not clear is whether or not the AUO572D is in fact a 1 watt panel or if the software/firmware has been disabled, because I also do not notice any difference in battery life between the machines even though I'm using the brighter display panel on the custom build at 50% screen bightness or below - which is supposed to be int he 1 watt energy consumption territory. I sure hope this is the 1 watt display and we see a firmware update that will enable the power savings. Any thoughts??
     
  2. johnnobts

    johnnobts Pen Pal - Newbie

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    btw could not get my Aorus 1080 Box EGPU to play well with the folio sadly. It will detect it, install drivers. But I cannot use it, at least not with the built in display. It would probably work with an external monitor though, but I didn't try it, as I've currently got the EGPU boxed back up and ready to sell along with my Matebook.
     
  3. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I'm hesitant to comment too deeply because it might just add to the confusion, but here's what I know with certainty.

    1. The Intel 1 watt display tech is something that any manufacturer could adopt. The most important thing to realize is that there are three critical components
    A. Firmware level software to control the display
    B. An Intel sourced controller (which is over and above the usual hardware on a display panel)
    C. The Intel HD graphics driver.

    2. That being said, I haven't been able to find any definitive information on the AUO572 that says exactly what it is. Short of opening the machine up to determine if the controller is present there is no way to my knowledge to know with certainty that it's the Intel 1 watt display. So some additional caveats to that.

    A. Measuring battery life of the overall machine is not an accurate way to determine power draw especially because of the way the Intel 1 watt display tech works (to very much oversimplify, it's sort of like turbo on the core I chips). The only way I know currently is to hook the display to a rather niche and expensive machine that specifically tests power draw.

    B. The 1 Watt power draw on our engineering sample (which is an AU panel but not the 572) is only obtained at 200 NIT light output.
    Above that power consumption increases and in fact with our engineering sample at full brightness of 415 list it draws just under 3 watts
    And to further complicate this whole thing, a manufacturer may have to adjust (aka throttle) the processor for example because of the increased heat output of the display at high brightness. Thus lower processor speed (and power consumption) could offset the higher power consumption of the display.

    C. It is possible to drive the 1 watt displays like a conventional display, but of course that defeats the purpose of having them to begin with.

    So to wrap this up. First of all the latest firmware and InteL HD graphics drivers which came out right before Christmas hugely improved the issues we saw with our engineering sample to the point where it passed our internal certifications.

    And it's possible that the 572 panel for at least now is HP exclusive and until some independent source gets it hands on one and additional information too, there is no way to know for certain on much of this.

    TLDR: Lots of theories and speculation, but very short on hard facts :)
     
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  4. dstrauss

    dstrauss Comic Relief Senior Member

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    I am getting concerned about the heating issue. I've notice skipping and lags in the screen input today, with processor running between 58-60C constantly, and nothing much running than Chrome, OneNote (not used much) Outlook , and Word. Even short videos like Lisa's Folio review stop, start, and run video behind sound at time.

    Caveat - I run my Folio in tablet mode so I can have it ready for note taking - using it full time that way may be hurting the passive cooling design.

    Good News - the 90W Elite Thunderbolt dock works perfectly with the Folio - have my displayport QHD monitors, printer, keyboard, Ethernet all hooked up and running.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2018
  5. Cuhulin

    Cuhulin Scribbler - Standard Member

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    On the heating, I have a couple notes. I have the BestBuy version. I notice the speaker area just left of center is hot, but not as hot as your description suggests, and I do not have skipping. I do tend to run in the presentation mode instead of the physical tablet mode, frequently with Windows 10 tablet mode turned on so that I can write a quick note if desired, so maybe there is more airflow.

    Other than the differences between the BestBuy version and yours, the Folio is connected by TB3 to HP's Omen Accelerator dock instead of your Elite Thunderbolt dock, but that is about it.

    So either it is the difference in positions, fewer pixels being pushed, as mine are driven by the RX 580 in the Omen dock, or the difference in screens, LTE, and disk and memory size, as I did not not max out the system like you did. Maybe someone with a system in the middle can advise us.
     
  6. Evan Berry

    Evan Berry Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Thank you, Desertlap! I appreciate your input on this. I hope HP and the intel folks get the bugs worked out so we can realize the power efficiency they intended with the display. Otherwise, we will get nowhere near the HP claimed 18 - 19 hours of battery life on these folios.

    Dale, I’m sorry to hear you’re having heating concerns on your unit. I had similar concerns when I was setting my folio up, but not since with normal use (which for me is MS office apps and about a dozen chrome tabs).
     
  7. dstrauss

    dstrauss Comic Relief Senior Member

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    Doing better this evening in laptop mode: 32-35 topping out around 42C. I can understand that full time use of tablet mode may be the problem, much like using the SB2 in draw mode - it tended to overheat badly.

    I did run a couple of Youtube videos in background and it upped to 37-38C constantly, but still no heavy heating. It could be that Thunderbolt dock as well; more testing to come after the first.

    One last observation, in a semi-dark room, 25% is more than bright enough - anything over 50% is too bright - a very good discovery.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2018
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  8. lovelaptops

    lovelaptops My friends call me Jeff Senior Member

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    I have been using the app batteryInfoView for quite a number of years for all kinds of power monitoring. The most useful - and, I believe, an exclusive - feature of this tiny utility is that you can get power draw readings theoretically every second, though I usually have mine set on 20 second updates. This enables me to get apparently real time readouts of the changes in power consumption from any change in operating parameters, from screen brightness, to battery power setting, to different apps running, etc. I find it tracks fairly well with other battery meters (Windows, BatteryBar, etc) in terms of overall capacity measurements but it is the only one that gives you virtually real time consumption (regulated in its settings). Because it tracks well with other third party apps on capacity tracking, I assume it's real time calculations are accurate as well. I'd love it if you, @desertlap , or anyone else with the "niche expensive machine that tests power draw," could possibly test the accuracy of this app in its near-real time readings. Regardless, I highly recommend the utility.

    Edit: Clearly, this app cannot measure the fractional second boosts and reductions of power draw from the screen alone by the Intel controller, but if you keep most other sources of power drain constant (and low), you can interpolate the first derivative from screen brightness changes.
     
  9. JoeS

    JoeS I'm all ears Senior Member

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    Thanks for the tip. fwiw, BatteryBar gives the power draw every 5 seconds in the popup that shows when you hover the mouse over its battery image. In the case of batterybar I think it's actually showing a running average of the past minute or so, updated every 5 seconds, so it's possible BatteryInfoView provides better near real time information. Anyway, on with the Folio discussion.
     
  10. lovelaptops

    lovelaptops My friends call me Jeff Senior Member

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    Based on the degree of changes - as much as 50+% every 10 seconds - I'm guessing BIV is real time, but there can be a lot of hokus-pokus behind cool-looking numerical readouts whose algorithm is unknown. ;)
     
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