HP Slate 500 Thoughts and Concerns

Discussion in 'HP Slate' started by jgjackson, Oct 28, 2010.

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  1. jgjackson

    jgjackson Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Battery Life

    Five hours, or even four hours, will work well for me. The longest stretch I ever use my tablet without being able to top off the battery is Church service, which means about 3 hours. If sleep mode actually works well and wake up is quick, I'll be able to stretch it easily be letting it sleep until I want to jot down a note or look up a passage or do a search or something like that.

    I'm not too happy about the non-user-replacable batter. I'm not so much concerned about the expense of a factory replacement, but the amount of time I'm without the device while it's being replaced. Of course, it's an HP, so I guess it'll have to be shipped back for repair once a year anyway.

    Free Disk Space

    64GB is not a lot. My Logos Bible Software installation is about 22GB and my music library is about 12GB. How much is going to be left after that? I don't want to have to resort to storing most of my documents or installing software on an SDHC card. Does it support SDXC?

    Screen Rotation

    I see the screen rotation is quick, but I hope I can turn off the auto rotation. My Touch Pro 2 does that in mail and browsers and I absolutely hate it. Everytime I turn around to quick or pick it up at a slightly off angle, it rotates and I have to wait till it rotates back. I've also seen software that looses it when you have two rotations in rapid succession, like of I accidently pop the lid open on my old gateway tablet and close it back real quick. I'd just as some use the mobility center to rotate, thank you very much.

    Capacitive Screen

    I'm excited about having the multitouch gestures available (have you noticed that no one uses the touch gestures, other than pinch to zoom, on any of the run throughs? Do they even know they exist? No wonder everyone complains about Windows not being touch optimized! They keep trying to maximize the window by touching the tiny maximize button instead of dragging the window to the top of the screen or scroll by touching the scroll bar instead of using a two finger drag, etc.). But I've never had a capacitive screen before, so I'm unsure how well it'll actually work. We saw the so-called palm-rejection issue that one previewer had. I think that was because his hand was still touching the screen when he lifted the pen too high. On a resistive screen, you'd be so lightly touching the screen by the time you get your stylus that far above the screen, the touch won't register. I think capacitive probably would still register.

    NTrig Stylus

    NTrig has an abysmal reputation. It's taken them years to get the first generation product to actually work reliably on Dell and TX tablets. At least, I've seen a few comments suggesting that recent updates have finally gotten them to work (after, what? 3 years?). Hopefully the second generation will work better out the door. The stylus is make or break for me. If I can't take notes when I want to within a very few seconds of waking it up and it work without skipping, this tablet will go right back to HP (30-day return policy, $15 restocking fee: I asked before I ordered).

    Dock
    The lack of an ethernet port on the easel dock is disappointing. I'll have to get a USB adaptor to be able to get on the network at work. I hope they make the dock available for separate purchase. I'd like to have one at work too. I'm wondering if it will be able to play 1080p content on external monitors plugged into the dock. I've seen some references to "handling" 1080p, and others that only reference 720p.

    Case
    The case looks great. The only improvement I could suggest is some pockets for extra SD cards. Maybe it has them and no ones mentioned it yet (yeah, wishfull thinking).

    Speed
    I'm not too worked about speed. My current tablet is 1.06GHz, and I never complained about Photoshop on a Pentium Pro 200MHz. The real issue for running some apps is going to be screen size, not processor speed.
     
  2. Frank

    Frank Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Battery life:
    Yup, 5h is good, and if it's the normal battery life and not an artificial then it's enough

    Free Disk:
    Sure, it's not a lot. But more than comparable media slates. It's also not meant as a notebook replacement. Because of the USB port you could put your bible on a thumb drive and connect it if you need it.

    NTrig:
    Capacitive and pen is the best possible combination at the moment. N-Trig drivers have a poor reputation and they still haven't managed to support major drawing software like Adobe Photoshop. Don't know why.

    Speed:
    You can't compare your 1.06GHz Pentium processor with an Atom. They are totally different and the Atom is much slower at the same clock speed.
    The biggest fear I have is the fact that it's a single core processor. Dual Core processors don't have to be faster, but they feel much faster because the OS stays full operable all the time, even if some background task (which Windows has a lot of) does its work.


    So for the price they could have included an IntelCULV processor and used the well known and risk-free Wacom touchscreen and digitizer. I wouldn't complain if N-Trig drivers got Photoshop support.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 18, 2015
  3. dstrauss

    dstrauss Comic Relief Senior Member

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    Battery

    Agreed, if 5 hours is real life, and not screen on, everything else off, to get there. Here's hoping for plenty of after market chargers.

    Free Disk Space

    The product brochure claims SDXC compatibility, and I know I saw a reviewer somewhere claiming support for up to 128gb (the SDXC standard supports upt to 2 TB - although you'll need to be Bill Gates to afford one next year). I think you'll be pleasantly surprised that the 64gb SSD, once you get rid of the Win7 extras you never use, gives you room to grow, and 32gb SD card now go for under $90 (64gb around $220). I've used a 64gb SSD on a Dell Mini 9 for some time now with good success.

    Capacitive Screen

    My readings indicate N-Trig has improved to near Wacom quality over the last 6-9 months. That of course is for text and light drawing use. If you really need Photoshop and Autocad precision, go with a full power laptop/desktop. I think we need to kee a level of reaonabilit with current technology.

    Speed

    My Dell Mini 9 is a first generation Atom processor (1.6 I belive). When I upgraded to a 64gb SSD (pcie connection only - the HP should be snappier) and 2gb ram, I found Win 7 Home Premium to run much better than XP, and on regular tasks (email, web, Word docs, Excel) it ran as well as my HP 2730p. Yes, you could overwhelm it with many programs open and web surfing at the same time, but it was not crippled as many in the tech press and blogs fear.

    IT WILL NOT BE AS 'SNAPPY" AS THE iPAD I AM REPLACING, AND I KNOW THAT. But let's be brutally honest here - the iPad (and I owned one for three months) is a beautiful looking media displaying device. It has a custom processor built SPECIFICALLY for its limited iOS, and is hand tuned for that environment (otherwise how in heavens name could it ever get by with 256mb of ram memory). Software is written specifically for that platform, and is ALWAYS an App, not an Application. That is an amazing distinction we often overlook. The versions of Pages, Numbers and Keynote are restricted and again hand tuned for that interface. There is no Aperture, Final Cut, Adobe CS, MS Office - in fact, no full function software. Can you make do with a conglomeration of Apps in a business environment - YES - or at least you can if you're willing to live with a bucket of speciality applications: Goodreader, DocsToGo, Pages, Numbers, Keynote, Note Taker HD or Penultimate, Filebrowser, etc. AND you still don't have even a weak replacement for OneNote.

    My HP Slate will not be as "hip" as my iPad, and for appearnces sake, may well not be as responsive and flashy, but like many users, I need a reliable business tool; one that can share my OneNote notebooks, browse network shares, heavy email with multiple attachments, and permit editing of Office documents while maintaining 100% formatting fidelity with other users or opponents - AND IT HAS TO PROVIDE AN ACTIVE DIGITIZER. One of the biggest lies Steve Jobs has ever told and snowed the tech consumer market is pen=fail. Until you have written on a tablet PC screen just like it was paper, and two months later search for and find those HANDWRITTEN NOTES without converting to text, you have NOT EXPERIENCED a tablet/slate PC.

    PS - did I mention USB port, SDXC slot, included dock with 2 USB and HDMI 1080p out, custom folio case, active digitizer pen - guess its not all "advantage iPad" after all. :D
     
  4. ships10

    ships10 Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Great discussion. I hope you guys keep the thoughts going.
    I enjoyed reading all of this.
    My inclination is towards a device that has a full OS , digital pen,
    expansion slots, and portability. Can anyone comment on the processor
    quality and functionality with a full OS?
    Also, is 2GB of ram enough to run windows 7?
    How good is the digital pen?
     
  5. Liberty

    Liberty Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I would think the atom processor will get really hard to live with. People complain how slow the TM2 is compared to the 2740p.
     
  6. watchdog

    watchdog Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I find it kind of amusing how the pro-apple nerds on other sites keep yelling DOA, I think they are scared this thing will actually be an iPad killer and make an investment in the pad seem silly and overpriced.
    The iPad is all fine and good for an entertainment device, but if you need something for professional work, this device easily kicks the pad in the teeth.
     
  7. heatlesssun

    heatlesssun Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    If the HP Slate performs as well as we hope it's going to be a device difficult to dismiss. Yes, we all know only 5 hours (let's hope that's the case) and Windows 7 isn't a touch optimized UI but when you through in the pen this device becomes an awesome note taker. Throw in Windows 7 and the 1080P play back ability using the decently touch enabled Windows Media Player and Center and you have a compelling media player. And for general productivity with apps like Office 2010 and the pen, iPad and Android as touch enabled as they are are simply no match for the overall functionality.

    As you stated, the iPad is a great entertainment device but it simply can't compete at this time with the best productivity apps on the planet which WILL work fine with a pen and Office 2010 works better than most realize through touch.

    Will ANY review units come out before the pre-orders start shipping? Thus far it doesn't look like it which is a bit odd. I do wonder if HP is worried that Windows devices will undercut their webOS ones? Personally I think that with the iPad, Android, and Playbook on the way webOS is going to be a TOUGH sell. I simply don't see what it has that the other mobile OS devices don't already have and how HP is going to get developers on board.

    HP is going to have to sink a TON more money into promoting and developing webOS and it's going to be a long time before those devices turn a profit. I don't know how much the HP Slate cost develop but it couldn't be anywhere near as expensive as their webOS device(s) when you throw in the cost of the Palm acquisition.
     
  8. heatlesssun

    heatlesssun Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    My SU9600 honestly never feels slow, it runs a lot of games, Visual Studio 2010 runs well on it and most others report the same thing.

    A 1.86 GHz Atom is plenty fast enough to be useful, most netbook owners nth this class of hardware seem to happy with it overall from my observation. Of course it's no speed demon but if it's fast enough to drive handwriting recognition smoothly overall I'll be pleased as punch.
     
  9. Agent 9

    Agent 9 Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Indeed, the SU9600 is usually way more than I need; most of the time
    it is just headroom. But then again, that's how the computer market has been for a while now (buying the most head room, which will never be used... ever)

    I agree that for windows 7 a decent atom processor is all that is really needed for fast operation. Even with the atom (and slimming down the crapware/ optimizing win 7) there will be a lot of head room with some decent amount of programs running.

    Speed on lower powered hardware is only about being smart in what you let run on your computer (and what sites you browse... in windowz, lol). Honestly now, people get viruses, run anti-virus software, and run programs/ "tool bar addons" that do nothing for them; then complain about sluggish response/ performance (when they should be practicing smart computing/ browsing; and using linux for "shady" things)

    anti-virus has never done a darn thing for me; so I stopped using it a long time ago. if anything goes wrong I can usually fix it, or just re-install everything in under a day. To me the gained speed of a totally un-burdened system is well worth the minimal risk (remember... safe browsing habits/ smart computing, and linux)
     
  10. Bronsky

    Bronsky Wait and Hope. Senior Member

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    The speed of the atom running W7 is my biggest concern as well. However, the 500 is really the first fully functioning W7 tablet with a pen. When it was released, I thought it was worth a try. I had considered something like the new epocket readers that are 7" android units with a wacom pen, but D2G is not complete enough for me to work productively on the road. I need a fully functioning version of Acrabat to effectively redline, blackline and revise documents (my main travel use).

    During the 30 day evaluation period, I am going to be running this tablet through as many real world tests as I can. I intened to be very critical. There are too many new products coming to market in the coming year to settle for something that does not perform well. Hopefully HP has done its design work well and its reliance on the lowly atom is not misplaced. If the power concerns turn out to be justified, I can always send it back. The problem for me is that I don't see anything on the horizon to fulfill the niche that the 500 seems to be targeted at ATM.

    Bronsky:cool:
     
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