HP Pavilion 11 x2

Discussion in 'Hewlett Packard' started by fatxander, Oct 30, 2013.

  1. cardman827

    cardman827 Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I think even at 599 its still a good machine but I was able to get the discount by calling them on the phone. All I had to do was send a picture of my xp start screen to a special email that they gave me. Once they received the picture they gave me a code to use online which gave me the 100 off. I had to complain a little bit that no where does it say you can't combine discounts..
     
  2. Analytical Guy

    Analytical Guy Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I agree that at $599, this machine is the perfect deal for the right person. But it was the promise of a $499 price that made me pounce on a machine that I otherwise probably wouldn't have considered.

    Lately, I've been waiting to figure out which of the 4 GB Bay Trails I'm going to buy – the HP ElitePad (or its little brother, the ProPad), the Lenovo ThinkPad 10 (but don't Lenovo machines have Wi-Fi or WiDi problems?), and the Dell Venue 11 Pro, when they finally release a Bay Trail version with 4 GB RAM and hopefully a working stylus.

    Nevertheless, the x2 seemed to meet a different, if not pressing, need – to replace my Asus Transformer T100. The x2 has a similar clamshell case, but a bigger screen, a wider keyboard, 4 GB of RAM, and a more powerful processor (probably more powerful than I need).

    However, my impulsive desire to do a "quick upgrade" lost a lot of its steam when I started having unsuccessful chats and phone calls with Microsoft, and I started feeling like I was trying to "pull a fast one" in getting the XP discount.

    If Microsoft had verbalized a simple answer regarding their XP policy, I might have been able to shift gears faster. But in one chat, they told me I can't combine discounts, and in another they said that the combining of discounts only applies to typing in a discount code, not to the automatic XP discount. I asked a couple of Microsoft chat people if I could just place the order using the machine of a friend who has Windows XP. I had one guy "advise against it," but he wouldn't elaborate on why.

    I couldn't even get a straight answer on whether the x2's 8.5 hours of battery life came from the tablet only, or partially from the keyboard dock, or something else.

    There was one final problem – the fact that I have not read a review or anything else about this machine, and its i5 configuration, with whatever battery arrangement it now has, on any review site, or anywhere but in this thread.

    So, with my momentum killed, it was time to be more practical about the trade-offs. Do I need a Core i5? Do I need it enough but I will take it over the higher resolution (and lighter weight) of the other machines? Where do I stand on my stylus needs? etc.

    I suppose I still might decide to jump on this deal at $599. But I have a hunch that the $599 price won't require any "jumping," and I can wait to see what other machines come out before I make a decision. As a general rule, I find that prices only get lower if I wait a few months, so I guess there's no rush on this particular machine.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2014
  3. jtsmall

    jtsmall Scribbler - Standard Member

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    The MS Store seems less professional, based on my encounters as detailed above, than I had thought it would be. I have been unable to locate the Haswell Pavilion 11 X2 elsewhere and maybe that exclusivity is reflected in this encounter. Maybe the brick and mortar experience would be a positive one but I can't say.

    Certainly I would not phrase this chapter as an overall positive experience. Would I recommend the mail order MS Store to others?

    Regarding reviews of the Pavilion 11 X2 series I have found essentially no reviews, not even from users save this forum. Those I have found were with the Split X2, all 13.3" behemoths rather than mobile hybrids like the Envy X2. On the other hand parts are parts as we see below and I have had a Bay Trail N3520 11" X2 in hand for two weeks and all are of the same build differing only in parts. Of course, the devil is in the details (and maybe at the online MS Store).

    Moving on, the Dell digital stylus has been modified and several drivers have come out since the initial reviews. I understand from several sources those issues have been resolved, albeit they were with the 8" and not so much the 11" according to Lisa's Mobile Tech Review.

    I use the Venue 8 Pro but until the need arises for the digital stylus I'm waiting. Instead I picked up the new Targus slim capacitive stylus $15 and it works well to drive Office and other desktop applications. In my case the 8 was a replacement for the Nexus 7 (2012).

    My preference in the hybrid configuration is 11.6" otherwise I would have swallowed the 2 GB RAM and eMMC specs and purchased the Dell Venue 11 Pro also. For longevity the hi resolution IPS LCD and removable battery are pluses.

    If one wants primarily a tablet, then the smaller screen is a plus also but I use the Envy X2 as primarily a laptop so 11.6" it is. Having said that, the weight of the Dell screen diminishes it's tablet suitability.

    These are engineering tradeoffs that are inevitable. No doubt the Dell is a quality device that in hybrid configuration is both lighter and more compact than the Pavilion X2.

    The Pavilion 11 X2 is the follow up of the Clovertrail Envy X2 that was well received and I have enjoyed it since last March 2013. The changes for the Pavilion follow up models are polycarbonate for aluminum and the offering of several processors including Bay Trail and Haswell ULV Cores. The hybrid form factor is proven and the hardware are otherwise known components.

    What is less clear is the economy packaging of those internals, keyboard and ultra wide angle LCD. In my two weeks with the Bay Trail N3520 unit I only had concerns with the track pad and of course the single battery. It needs two just like the Envy and so they have that two battery configuration in the ULV i5 unit. They do in the Bay Trail too but one has to go looking for that configuration. When I found it the cost was the same as the Haswell Core which also included a real SSD for the same price.

    Game over. Haswell and SSD trumps them all. I just hope the battery life is as advertised and the trackpad holds up well. I'll know about the battery immediately (I'm reasonably certain it will meet or exceed spec in low power mode) but the trackpad only over time. The rest I know from before and it's good, not withstanding I'd rather have the Envy's aluminum like many have also observed.

    If you were to go this configuration with the Dell Venue you'll also have a fan that makes noise and pulls down the battery. Also one must be prepared to open that wallet a lot wider!

    Again, engineering tradeoffs.

    Finally, I believe one would find the Haswell about like the N5320 as they are not that far apart in performance except the Core is paired with an SSD but the N with eMMC storage, which is as slow as a hard drive and has half the capacity! The base Dell uses a slower Bay Trail Atom Z3770 and that 2 GB RAM is criminal. The processor can handle up to 8 GB, yet Dell economized with 2 GB. And, again, the eMMC storage is just too slow (fine for a tablet but then why look for a hybrid if a tablet will do).

    I've had to work my way through these trade offs and costs given my particular use case (which I have not gone into detail here). Another's needs will place a different outlook on these tradeoffs.

    -jts

    Sent from my Galaxy Note 2 using Tapatalk
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2014
  4. cyberteker

    cyberteker Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I'm in the same situation, looking for a laptop/tablet hybrid.

    This thread has been very informative and helpful to me.
    Thank you to all that have posted.

    Similarly, I had plans to purchase an Asus T100 but was concerned also
    by the slow eMMC drive and 2GB RAM, so I started checking other models.

    After all the research/reading on various tech/retail websites,
    it has lead me here and the HP Pavilion 11 x2.

    I agree with jtsmall about the severe lack of reviews regarding the HP Pavilion 11 x2.
    So we definitely have to rely on information from people who recently purchased this model
    and compare hardware specs.

    I nearly purchased the HP Pavilion 11-h110nr x2 (Pentium N3520 with 64GB SSD) from Amazon a few days ago, it was on sale for $442.
    The price is back to $499.

    What stopped me was a chance to purchase the HP Pavilion 11-h112nr x2 (Intel Core i5-4202Y) for $499, with
    the $100 off XP promo.

    When I called Microsoft Store, a rep told me I only had to email her a screenshot of the system properties screen,
    that clearly showed the XP product key. Once that was received, she would be able to apply that $100 off.

    That's the problem with the Microsoft Store XP promo, it's very vague and confusing to consumers. With varying info/answers
    from Microsoft sales reps.

    So now, I'm patiently waiting for the Asus T200 (faster, better specs than the T100 & x2?), that is supposedly to be released in May/June, so I can make my final purchasing decision. :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2014
  5. cyberteker

    cyberteker Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Regarding the

    HP PAVILION 11-H110NR X2 (Pentium N3520 with 64GB SSD)

    and

    HP PAVILION 11-H112NR X2 (Core i5-4202Y with 128GB SSD)

    Is there really a significant performance/speed difference between these 2 CPUs?
    Based on CPUBOSS and Notebookcheck.net, etc., comparisons, there is a minor difference in benchmarks.


    As jtsmall mentioned, the GPU specs is the noticeable difference with the

    Pentium N3520 having only HD Graphics (Bay Trail) - HD Graphics 4000 - 4 EUs

    Core i5 4202Y having the HD Graphics 4200 - 20 EUs.




    jtsmall mentions that the i5 model has an SSD and the N3520 with an eMMC.

    I went to check HP Pavilion x2 manual,

    Manuals for HP Pavilion 11-h112nr x2 PC | HP® Support

    The parts & replacement parts indicate that all the HP Pavilion 11 x2 models use M.2 SATA-3 SSDs.
    The only difference is the system boards for the i5 and Pentium.


    So, I'm very curious on current x2 owners (between i5 & Pentium models) and their benchmark results.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2014
  6. jtsmall

    jtsmall Scribbler - Standard Member

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    No Hopefully the relative feel between the N3520 and i5-4202Y can be reported from a hands on shortly. I had the N for 2 weeks. Expecting the Y later today, the 21st.

    If you look at CPU Benchmark scores using PassMark

    i5-4200U = 3321 typical Ultrabook
    i5-4202Y = 2680 HP Pavilion 11 X2 (originally posted as 'not reported but > 4210Y')
    i5-4210Y = 2247
    N3520 = 1894
    Z3770 = 1326 Dell Venue 11 Pro
    Z3740 = 1062 ASUS T100, Venue 8 Pro
    Z2760 = 679 HP Envy X2 (corrected from the prior posted 1062)

    See http://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu_list.php

    The Y has HD 4200 and real SSD.
    The others below the Y sport lesser gpu and eMMC storage.

    Hard to see the N measuring up to the Y. The Venue and T100 not in the same league running Bay Trail Atom.

    However for surfing, video and MS Office not a big deal among them. I develop 24 MP RAW files with Adobe. That will soak up all the muscle one can throw at it. Same for video editing, which I don't do. I would expect same for sound processing (DAW) which I have done and will do during the lifetime of the Y should I keep it. I'm seeking the best mobile (take any where any time) muscle for the least cost.

    I don't play games so that takes the pressure off the gpu. None of the tablets or hybrids are well suited for other than older games at the least resolution settings according to review after review. If I were a gamer it'd be a DIY desktop tower all the way according to Loyd Case's latest recommendations. I use to do that and after several builds with which I never seriously took to game play I stopped.

    Looking at a simple system level benchmark, NovaBench reveals similar relative numbers.

    About SSD and eMMC, I have found the two HP manuals confusing in particulars since these two apply across all the Pavilion 11 X2 platforms.

    For example I was convinced my first, the N3520 had dual batteries since that was in the manual. But it had only a single battery located in the tablet of course and hence 4.5 hr run time was all I was seeing. Yes, there's another with the same build except it has two batteries.

    I didn't deduce this from the manual but from specific model specs. Those same specs sheets list eMMC not a real SSD. But marketing purposely confuses the consumer by referring to both as SSD. I happened to review my printed copies last night before tossing them in the trash. So I'm doubly sure. Would it were otherwise. CrystalDiskMark scores for eMMC are embarrassing.

    -jts

    Sent from my Galaxy Note 2 using Tapatalk

    Addendum 4/25/14 - PassMark CPU score ofc2650 added from performance run on my copy of the Haswell Core i5-4202Y Pavilion 11 X2 2 in 1 Hybrid
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2014
  7. Analytical Guy

    Analytical Guy Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Cyberteker, you've done a great job making me wonder if the core i5 is worth the extra hundred dollars over the Pentium. But what do you make of the fact that the core i5 is listed as having 8.5 hours of battery life while the Pentium only has 5.5 hours?

    Core i5:
    Buy HP Pavilion 11-h112nr x2 Touchscreen 2 in 1 - Microsoft Store

    Pentium:
    Amazon.com: HP Pavilion 11-h110nr 11.6-Inch Detachable 2 in 1 Touchscreen Laptop with Beats Audio: Computers & Accessories

    is that just energy efficiency? Or does the one at the Microsoft store have a battery in the dock, while the Pentium doesn't? Or is the battery life in the Microsoft store being reported incorrectly?

    Welcome to the thread :)
     
  8. jtsmall

    jtsmall Scribbler - Standard Member

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    The i5-4202Y is listed as 8.5 plus hours.

    The Pentium with dual batteries is listed as 8.75 plus hours.

    It's the Pentium single battery variant that's listed 5.5 plus and I only saw 4.5 more or less in battery saver mode.

    -jts

    Sent from my Galaxy Note 2 using Tapatalk
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2014
  9. jtsmall

    jtsmall Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I would like to strongly echo Analytical Guy on these specific points. That's exactly how I felt dealing with the MS Store.

    That's the same confusing and contradictory answers I received from store personnel by chat and by direct phone conversation.

    It took considerable will power to stay positive and see the order through. I plan to revisit the $100 rebate issue once I've determined in a hands on if it's worth the challenge or I simply return it and keep searching.

    I compare this rather odd experience to what I usually find when shopping for an automobile!

    -jts

    Sent from my Galaxy Note 2 using Tapatalk
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2014
  10. Analytical Guy

    Analytical Guy Pen Pal - Newbie

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    jtsmall, thank you very much for all the solid info you add to this thread. I'm looking forward to your hands on impressions of the i5, the battery / batteries, the SSD... however you decide to evaluate its performance.

    I swear, I'm still not sure if the device at Microsoftstore.com has a battery in the keyboard dock. (If so, then the battery life of its tablet portion isn't as impressive as I had once believed.)

    Looking forward to reading your impressions!

    One more thought – for anyone reading this thread because they are thinking of buying the Pavilion x2: if you want to assess the basic look and feel, and try typing on the keyboard, and heft the tablet portion in your hands to see how it feels, there are stores that have the Pentium version in stock.

    I drove over to my local Office Depot, just to see what I thought of the typing experience and the weight. My general sense was that it felt about like my Asus Transformer T100 (smooth plastic case, the two pieces lock together solidly, etc.), but the extra width made the typing experience a lot nicer.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2014

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