How to replace swollen Battery on Vaio Z Canvas

Discussion in 'VAIO / Sony' started by moti n, Jul 8, 2017.

  1. neongolden

    neongolden Scribbler - Standard Member

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    They wrote this back:

    I immediately lost all stamina ‒ all will to move forward. My unit was 3-6 months past the 1 year warranty, and I just assumed that's the conclusion they'd reach, at which point I'd be out at least $100. I should have at least written back to ask if they'd unconditionally fix it once they realized it was the battery manufacturer's fault. However, three more months have passed since I had that dialog.

    I put it out of my mind and moved on.

    I'll always regret ordering it directly from Vaio, instead of getting it from the MS Store where I could get an extended warranty (it was either cheaper-than-usual or free if I recall correctly). There was no reason to do what I did.

    Let us know if it turns out differently for you.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2017
  2. moctodTPCR

    moctodTPCR Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Mine is 1.9 yrs old when I notice this a few days ago. Yes, I got the same message about $99. The thing with me is that I used Amex to insure I get an extra year. The grey area for me is that the purchase was made on eBay, which I've heard conflicting stories if Amex will cover it or not. But I've been with them for over a decade, have never ever filed any claim. So I'm going to do this and see if they will cover me.

    I'm reading this thread and it seems like some are saying if it's a battery issue, Vaio should fix it for us for free? Even out of warranty? Is there precedent for this from other companies? Seems like this is a common issue. Anyway to pull together for some sort of petition?

    A tablet with this much power, everything crammed in. Maybe we should have seen this coming. Never buying Vaio again. I was drawn by the quad core. But other ultrabooks and the Surface book has them too now. And Vaio doesn't even seem to have anything new for a few years now.
     
  3. jbaks

    jbaks Scribbler - Standard Member

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    why do you guys think this has happened to you guys? Do you all use it alot on battery? lets try to come up with some things that an owner like my self can do to prevent it from happening to me.

    Do you guys got any suggestions, the ones that have the battery expanding issue, that us owners can do that might prevent it from happening to us. thanks guys

    What do you think steve, you think its maybee effecting people who are leaving it on in there bags? you think theres something we can do to prevent it from happening to us.
     
  4. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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    <<...What do you think steve...you think theres something we can do to prevent it from happening to us...>>

    Let's start with an explanation of what's going on when a Li-ion battery puffs up; here's a typical article:

    https://www.tekrevue.com/swollen-battery/

    In particular, note this paragraph:

    "Don’t leave your device plugged in all the time. This is particularly an issue for laptop users who primarily use their laptop at home. The device sits plugged in to the wall all the time, and the battery isn’t given the opportunity to exercise its capacity. For Mac users, the free tool coconutBattery can help remind you when it’s time to unplug your power cord and let the battery complete a discharge and recharge cycle. Windows users can check out a number of options that offer similar functionality, such as BatteryCare (free) and BatteryBar Pro ($8)."

    More tomorrow...
     
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  5. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Man! -Lithium batteries are super toxic; they burn when they leak and if you inhale the gas, it can cause serious tissue damage to lungs and other mucous membranes.

    The manufacturing specs need to be pretty strictly adhered to, otherwise these things can really hurt people. -Which leads me to think that Vaio either messed up their engineering by not building a system which can handle every charging scenario within the expected use range, (leaving a computer plugged in permanently ought to be expected among at least some users, one would think), or they were sold a bad batch of parts.

    But if you already own one and there hasn't been a general recall, then knowing it might be a bit flaky helps. Overheating and overcharging, while they shouldn't if they're built correctly, might increase the odds of a shoddy unit failing.

    Maybe it's time to eBay those items and pick up something with a better track record?
     
  6. jbaks

    jbaks Scribbler - Standard Member

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    no i love my canvas z, my favorite piece of hardware iv ever owned, ebay wasnt what i was looking for or assumptions on manufacturing specs, i appreciate your post though, just tips i could follow to reduce the risk.
     
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  7. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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    <<...More tomorrow...>> Continued from Post #54

    For what it's worth, my thoughts on batteries and maintaining battery life.

    Some basic truths:
    • The most fundamental truth is that batteries are made to be used. Keeping your laptop or tablet plugged in and constantly charged to 100% is one of the surest ways that I know of to shorten their operating life.
    • Whether used or not, Lithium batteries have a finite lifetime. They begin to age from the moment of manufacture and they will die in as little as 3 but more typically 5+ years later. The good news is that Lithium battery technology is improving and the best cells last considerably longer than they used to, but it is natural for battery operating life to always decline with age.
    • By their nature, batteries are prone to some percentage of defects in manufacturing (more so than other electronic components) and sometimes you just get unlucky. Chemical batteries that can store a lot of energy require energetic (read: likely dangerous) components; Lithium is a very active chemical. Because of these active components, seemingly innocuous variations in manufacturing can have a significant effect on battery reliability.
    • Although one might hope it would be otherwise, OEMs are sometimes challenged to design / implement safe and reliable battery management circuitry (I'm looking at you, Samsung!). Sometimes, the component level suppliers (e.g., the battery management ICs or battery management daughterboard suppliers) share in this responsibility.
    Based on this, my philosophy is to operate my tablets primarily on battery power and only plug them in when the batteries reach somewhere between 50% to 20% charge. And when I say plug them in only to charge, I mean it; depending upon the battery state, a tablet might only be plugged in for an hour or two. I don't even leave tablets plugged in overnight (truth in advertising: I admit that I occasionally forget!). I also don't intentionally operate any of my tablets into deep discharge (below about 15% of charge); if a tablet happens to end up with a very low charge, I plug it in promptly. Routinely operating into very low (below 5%) states of charge can promote premature battery pack failure.

    And the results? All of my current Li-Ion / -Poly powered devices are working reasonably well. This includes tablets, laptops, cell phones and some high-capacity external batteries. Some of these devices are over 5 years old. In particular, my Surface 2 and my Dell Latitude TX2 have only now worked their way down to very short operating lives (about 1 hour), but conversely I have several Tekkeon and Electrovaya external batteries that are about 5 years old and still have a significant percentage of their original capacity.

    The bottom line here is that you can't "save" the batteries in your laptop or tablet by only operating off your AC adapter. It may seem counter-intuitive, but using your batteries is actually the best way to get optimal life out of them. Hope this helps...
     
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  8. jbaks

    jbaks Scribbler - Standard Member

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    hmm, i was looking into a setting in windows where it would stop the battery from charging to a 100 percent but i didnt find that setting.

    One of of my all time favorite features of the canvas is the button on the very top of the physical part of the tablet, its there to turn off touch from the entire tablet, taking notes is so much easier wen you dont have to worry about unwanted clicks and swipes, while palm rejection works its not full proof and more often then not when your taking notes in cramped spaces like student desks palm rejection dosnt always work that effectively, and more so when painting and drawing, not having a button to turn off touch on demand, i dont think i could live without it any more while drawing or taking notes. jesus help us all! The world is incomplete without a physical touch disable button on all tablets and artist machines:p
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2017
  9. jbaks

    jbaks Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I would make a suggestion that charging the battery while the unit is turned off might help reduce heat, is my thinking wrong about this? Steve is there a program that keeps are batteries from charging fully to a 100 percent? I know windows 8 used to have a built in function where it would only allow the battery to charge to 96% at certain times. Id sell my machine if I didnt love drawing with it so much, theres no way im ever going to sell this machine cause of its drawing capabilities and form factor.
     
  10. stormi

    stormi Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Hey, it looks like my Canvas has the same issue... It wasn't visible from the outside (not swollen enough yet to separate the screen from the case) but after disassembly it's clearly visible :mad:
    And I used it rarely on battery, but more often under high load with the battery draining.

    This battery issue starts to look like a more common problem with the Z Canvas to me. I suggest anyone with their device still under warranty to be alerted and check for any slight separation of the display/case or bulge.

    IMG_20171123_192808.jpg IMG_20171123_192823.jpg
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2017
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