Have anyone who clear about Windows 10 and tablet built-in GNSS?

Discussion in 'Windows 10' started by timon, Dec 15, 2015.

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  1. timon

    timon Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Hello,

    The Windows 8 device the built-in GNSS is incompatible to mainstream GPS apps (a large number of existing resources), caused the problem by the Windows 8 Location API and Sensor API, and thus the already existing GPS app resources are unable of being used directly.
    Helplessly, these Windows 8 tablet purchasers who have to do buy and use of a third-party stepping-stone patch software --- "Centrafuse Localizer", otherwise the Windows 8 tablet GNSS is simply a waste.

    So what is the built-in GNSS usability in Windows 10?
    Seems like still the same problem?
    The "Centrafuse Localizer" or similar patch software is still a must usage?

    Please reply, Thanks
     
  2. gcoupe

    gcoupe Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Exactly the same for Windows 10. Since Windows 8, Microsoft has introduced a new set of APIs for sensors, including Location, and the older generation of Windows (desktop) applications weren't written for them. Some software has been updated by the developers, but not all.

    If you want to continue using the legacy software, and this has not been updated, then you will have to use a software shim such as Centrafuse Localizer or GPSDirect to connect the GNSS sensor to the legacy virtual COM ports used by such software.

    Alternatively, you could look at the new generation of GPS apps that have been written for the new APIs. One of these (Maps Pro) actually supports both types of APIs.
     
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  3. timon

    timon Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Thanks for your reply

    Travel and hiking go to non-urban zones, Google satellite maps and Google Earth are still the most useful satellite map and location tool, meantime the browsed zone's cache files can seriatim be packed to get ready for offline map usage. (despite the usability in the new version Google maps is not as good as the previous version)
    Furthermore, Google satellite maps and Google Earth have already spawned a lot of GPS app resource for the x86 Windows platform.
    Thus, you needed to use NMEA and virtual COM port for the kind of mainstream GPS usage, but the Windows tablet built-in GNSS is not directly compatible, very execrable.

    Does not argue against Microsoft to introduce a new set of APIs for sensors and location, but it ought to be compatible to mainstream GPS usage. No doubt, MS more contained other motives therein.

    Steve Ballmer lifted a boulder which finally hit Microsoft's toes, and Ballmer himself broken into the worst CEO one as his end.
    Trying to kidnap all of Windows users to go against Google maps and Google Earth? Merely gotten stupid fiasco on Windows tablet market.
    For a direct result, many buyers complain and even roar about the Windows 8 tablet GNSS, some buyers who said "would no longer buy Windows tablet next time," because Windows built-in GNSS is a cripple.

    In the earliest Windows 8 version the virtual COM port was fully unavailable, thus led to all of external GPS receiver were unable to be used, the later two years users' complaining voice around everywhere, and then MS had to update patch.
    However, built-in GNSS in Windows 8 (10) tablet that is still unfortunate, up to now.

    BTW. Google maps vs. Bing Maps
    GoogleEarth in Tibet Region.jpg Bing Maps in Tibet Region.jpg Bing Maps in Tibet Region is No suitable availability.jpg

    GoogleMaps_Alaska.jpg BingMaps_Alaska.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2015
  4. timon

    timon Pen Pal - Newbie

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    It seems people (Windows users) really need to protest Microsoft aloud and wider, ought to urge Microsoft makes Windows Location and Sensor APIs get directly compatible with NMEA usage.

    Should make MS CEO Satya Nadella personally heard users protesting.

    Microsoft's Windows toes were smashed that tossed a boulder by Ballmer.
     
  5. midi

    midi Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Ok for me I have an Ativ 700t1c with GNSS.
    First the drivers arent compatible with windows 10, so i had to force their way by installing windows 8.1 then upgrade.
    Second the gnss does work with Modern apps like Maps (win10) and I found a way to emulate mnea output to a com port and it's working for older software. Check http://4pda.ru/forum/index.php?showtopic=485397&st=0#entry23854513 this will open a post on how to make virtual ports and use the software above (it's in russian, so use google translate if needed), kinda easy and it's working with Navigator 15 for PC.
    Just to help , for the first time use your computer under a clear sky to get GPS data, then use the ports to pass the emulated NMEA data.
     
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