Galaxy Book Pros are real

Discussion in 'Samsung' started by desertlap, Apr 28, 2021.

  1. darkmagistric

    darkmagistric Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Neither have I, and I've seen many cracked screens in my years. but the way the cracks are so distributed..like the only way I could see a screen cracking like that is if the entire screen received an equal sized pressure applied to it. Like if it was closed and someone sat on it, or threw a heavy suitcase on top of it. If it was simply opening the lid that caused the cracks, it would be more prominent where that pressure was applied, but those cracks are fairly uniform thru-out the entire display.
     
  2. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Another possibility is that the tempered glass itself is flawed.

    A bad batch? It seems a bit unlikely. Glass manufacture is an exact science where small variables can have large effects, but that means the processes are also exacting. We make tons (literally) of tempered glass, and we're really good at it. I've never heard of bad batches before.

    It's more likely that Samsung paired the wrong tolerances of two or more materials in their screen design. -And thermal expansion is a pretty big deal. If you figure an 8.5" x 14" sheet of metal is going to expand or contract by as much as a millimeter depending on the temperature, and with uneven heat distribution, I can see some unusual stresses occurring with glass which is bonded to it. -Like, if the top edge cools more slowly than the bottom edge, you wouldn't get bending so much as a tearing (and crushing) effect. Tempered glass is good at bending, but probably has trouble with lateral stresses. Or if the center is hot and the edges are cool...

    One of the ways I found to break window glass was to hold one of those little mini-torch lighters to a spot on the surface, and then let it cool normally in regular room temperature. A bullet-hole like fracture pops into being. (I was trying to make bumps in glass for some art project or other, and failed. Though I did learn some interesting ways to destroy windows.)

    So perhaps if the computer screen is heated evenly during use, but cools unevenly after it's turned off, plus with the metal cooling faster than the glass... It might explain why people are reporting never actually witnessing the breaks occur, but instead discover them when they next open up the computer.

    The Samsung engineers didn't account for thermal characteristics in their fervor to produce a fancy thin screen. It's funny; I can't blame them too much; I never think of thermal design in computers outside of trying to keep chips cool, and then it's never about the parts expanding and shrinking!

    Though.., you'd think it must be part of the design process. This can't be the first time it's come up.
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2021
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  3. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Doing some looking around...

    Apparently Samsung's long-standing way of dealing with this problem (when it comes to the TV division) is to lie, cheat and steal...

    I guess they figure the percentage of users who are going to see thermal expansion cracks in their devices is low enough that they can successfully ignore it, and they can get away with just feigning ignorance, like thermal cracking isn't a 'thing'.

    That's pretty cruddy behavior. I'm surprised at how much a scuzzy warranty policy can predispose me to dumping a company in favor of competitors.

    I hope a lot of people read this and Samsung they either fixes their warranty policy or their sales tank. I'm actually angry.

    Plus, super-thin screens are stupid anyway, especially on a laptop.
     
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  4. daddyfish

    daddyfish Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    , my guess it is mostly to make devices lighter (and possibly to save some costs in the meantime). Like a 15" screen + digitizer can be a heavy component in a laptop.
    It reminds me a bit of the screen cracking with the Surface Laptop 2 & 3 with metal deck (so not the alcantara ones), might have been a similar issue.
     
  5. doobiedoobiedum

    doobiedoobiedum Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Wow… I feel really bad for the buyer. That’s got to be the worst thing, especially if you’ve saved up and looked forward to this brand-new device.
     
  6. Qyygle

    Qyygle Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I'm curious if part of this might be the way Samsung implemented cooling for this line.
    The cracks in the photos are only really visible on the lit portion of the screen but I guess they extend all the way through the glass itself. The giant chin at the bottom is right on the exhaust for the cooling fans, I'm assuming they didn't change the layout from the Galaxy Flex series. I can pickup my Flex 15.6 from a corner and it flexes (heh, fitting for the product name) enough to click the trackpad from underneath the chassis regularly, even if I'm holding it nowhere near that. I can't imagine why anyone would try to make this thinner, but apparently Samsung thought that was a good idea.
    If the new line made the metal chassis just a bit thinner for 'weight savings' and the look... I'd bet the bottom part of the glass is now absorbing most of the heat coming out of the heatsink.
    If the laptop was busy running say... multiple Windows 11 updates and all the other misc. nonsense associated with setting up a new machine recently, it was probably subject to a lot of CPU load, leading to your aforementioned point source thermal stress right on the screen bottom
     
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