For heavy Adobe design use and drawing

Discussion in 'What Tablet PC Should I Buy?' started by Daria, Aug 30, 2016.

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  1. Daria

    Daria Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Hello there good people :)
    Apologies for lack of nice formatting but I'm trout this on a mobile phone.

    General Questions.
    1. What is your budget?

    Either up to £1500 for something good that will last long or up to £700 for a 'temporary' laptop until Surface Book 2 comes out (Spring 2017?). The thing is, my 6 years old desktop had just died and I really need to buy a new computer (been dreaming about having a laptop for years) within next couple of days (work cannot wait). I would rather buy just one and keep it more than 2-3 years, but I absolutely love Surface Book - wouldn't make sense to buy it now though, if a new model is going to be released fairly soon (Book 2).

    2. Would you consider purchasing used/refurbished?

    No, only new models.

    3. Do you prefer a media/mobile tablet like the iPad, Windows tablet PC, or notebook convertible?

    Convertible or a regular laptop.

    4. What size Tablet PC would you prefer?

    Ideally min. 15" but would consider 14.
    Ideally higher than FHD resolution.

    5. Which country do you intent to purchase from [where do you live]?

    UK

    6. Do you have any preferences to brand loyalty or dislikes?

    I like Lenovo and Dell (and Surface Book :))

    7. How many hours battery life do you require?

    not relevant, mostly I work at home

    8. What will be the primary usage scenario of this tablet? (Email/Web Surfing/Drawing/Word Processing/Entertainment/Notetaking etc)

    Graphic design (Adobe InDesign, Illustrator and Photoshop running simoustaniously) and illustration. I would love to buy a convertible that can handle all these three programs and also have a good touch screen with a wacom digitizer, so I can draw directly on screen. I'm used to my old desktop and Wacom Intuos.

    9. Do you have an OS preference? For example, do you own an iPhone and a Mac, or are you a Windows fan? Do you own an Android device and use Google services frequently?
    Win 10 . Been using win 7 until now and I'd be happy to change it at last.

    10. What software and tasks do you intend to run? (Microsoft Office or other Word Processing Suite/Photoshop/3D Studio Max/Autocad etc)
    Adobe InDesign, Illustrator, Photoshop, Chrome, Spotify. Maybe Premiere

    11. Do you intend on playing Games? If so please list.
    Not really.

    12. Would you like to stream content through your home theater system?
    No
    Screen Specifics

    1. Any preference on screen resolution?
    Ideally better than FHD.

    2. Will you be using the tablet outdoors? Do you need to be able to see it through glare from the sun?
    No outdoor use.

    See the above linked FAQ for guidance

    3. Do you require a pen? With or without pressure sensitivity? Do you prefer Wacom or N-trig?

    Wacom (if it's better than N-trig)
    See the above linked FAQ for guidance

    Component Specifics

    1. What size Hard Drive and Memory do you require? Would you like expandable memory?SSD would be good, more than 250. My old desktop had 8GB DDR2 and it was always fast and responsive, but I'm not sure is 8GB in a laptop would be enough to handle my design software running simoustaniously.

    Thank you so much for your time and advise, I'm really glad I found this forum. The choice is so wide and I have no clue what to buy.

    Just to add, the screen is very important to me. Can be either matt or shiny. I loved yoga 710 screen and Surface Book. Surprisinly, yoga 900 was so dark (on max brightness) that I wouldn't be able to use it.

    Thanks again :)
    Daria
     
  2. surfaceproartist

    surfaceproartist Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    The VAIO Z Canvas is the way to go for heavy lifting but it doesn't meet your display size requirement. The next best option would be the 14-inch Lenovo Thinkpad P40 Yoga.
     
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  3. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    If you're working from home, it might be better to skip the portable for now. -I'd invest in a Cintiq or Cintiq clone for two reasons:

    1. I am routinely surprised at the things I miss while doing portable work which I only catch on the mounted screen at home. This might be due the fixed angle and nature of a drafting table setup, or additionally due to being able to see your whole project blown up to broadsheet size in front of you. Either way, a fixed table setup with lots of elbow room is an absolute requirement if you are serious about graphic design.

    2. Wacom and N-Trig are using AES technology for portables, and it isn't refined enough yet imho, not as good as what you're used to with that Intuos tablet. The technology is okay for doing rough sketches at the cafe, but it's not the best tool for putting polish on your work. When drawing slowly, the line wobbles with AES, worse with N-Trig than with Wacom, but it's still an issue in both cases. If you're doing pro-level work, it makes sense to have a primary tool which does its job correctly under all conditions.

    Here's an example of the slow line wobble on a Surface Book:

    http://forum.tabletpcreview.com/thr...7000-15-6-wacom-aes.69641/page-25#post-476623

    If being portable is really important to you, and you're happy continuing to use your Intuos for your main studio machine, I'd go with Lenovo's 14" Yoga. It's the biggest supported system you can get in a 2-in-1 form factor. Dell's 15" 2-in-1 is lovely, but no longer available new, and the pen system is an anomalous feature which doesn't officially exist and is not supported. (I have one; it's a fun tool and great for sketching, but if I was stuck on it for everything, I'd want to rip my hair out and I'd be counting my pennies until I could buy a proper EMR machine.)

    FWIW, you can now get a used 21UX Cintiq on ebay for around $600.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2016
  4. Daria

    Daria Pen Pal - Newbie

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    @surfaceproartist @thatcomicsguy thank you guys so much for taking the time to reply, I greatly appreciate it.

    I will have a look at VAIO Z Canvas. It's pretty pricey though and probably too small for me.

    @thatcomicsguy I totally get your points about sticking to a desktop setting, but this time I'd really like to buy a laptop. I'm a designer and illustrator who spends most of their life in front of the computer (pretty bad, I know) but I work in a design studio so most of my working hours I'm doing there anyway - also some freelance at home (design and illustration). Thing is, since I got my (now dead) desktop pc 5-6 years ago, I've been moving houses literally 10 times, even across the countries, posting the whole huge and heavy machine via courier companies, fitting it in my luggage, etc - pure nightmare. Especially after having to move houses in the UK so many times already and still not being 100% settled down in one flat, I just can't even bare a thought of buying another desktop :)

    Thanks so much for showing me the jittery lines on Surface Book - definitely a deal-breaker for me. Do you think it would behave just as bad on Thinkpad P40? If so, probably I'll just buy a 'regular', non-touch laptop..

    It's just, the idea of having a compact laptop you can draw directly on is so, so tempting.. :)
    I've seen some reviews of Thinkpad P40 and I know the line accuracy is not perfect, but I'm just hopeful it would be good enough to not be annoying (like the one you linked to).

    Also, I think I didn't mention, that when needed. I'd be happy to work with an external screen and keyboard/mouse and use the laptop as if it was a desktop (I'm sure you know what I mean, sorry I don't know the right term for this setup).

    Many thanks again!
    Daria
     
  5. Azzart

    Azzart Late night illustrator Senior Member

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    I would go for the Vaio Z Canvas (16gb of ram) just for the sheer brute power.
    You could either use it then as a desktop substitute or as a portable tablet.
     
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  6. surfaceproartist

    surfaceproartist Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    @Daria the jitter evident in all active (battery-powered) pens is only an issue when you ink diagonally and very slowly. Is that typical of your style? Jitter can also be mitigated by software with brush stabilization like Clip Studio Paint.
     
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  7. Daria

    Daria Pen Pal - Newbie

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    @Azzart @surfaceproartist
    @thatcomicsguy

    Actually those diagonal lines are very typical for my style although I do draw them quick (usually). Just don't think paying so much money for something that is hard to work on, is a very good idea. Maybe it's better to buy a nice ThinkPad up to £800, stick to my Intuos and wait until the technology improves? You think this can happen anytime soon?

    Now a probably silly question. Is connecting an average convertible/tablet (say yoga 710) to an external screen (or better, a Cintiq!) going to affect the machine's performance?

    Many many thanks for your advice.. really appreciate your help
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2016
  8. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    @Daria:

    An artist can get by with Wacom's AES or even the Surface line, but you *will* notice issues. They can be worked around, and for many users, they're barely noticeable.

    For me, when I get to doing certain types of work, the shortcomings drive me nuts, -when I'm doing picky work where the pen speed is slow enough for whatever reason (short lines or complicated lines with specific requirements) where the line wobble requires multiple tries to get things right which would take only one try on an EMR machine.

    As comics legend, Jack Kirby once said, "They don't pay me to erase."

    But it's a personal style thing. Maybe it won't be relevant for you, and if that's the case, you should be really happy with that Yoga. -It even comes with a pen inside! (Though, it'd be a good idea to buy a larger AES pen; Surfaceproartist has lots of information and reviews on his website showing which pens work best.)

    It just pays to know your tools.

    Have fun with whatever you get!
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2016
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  9. Azzart

    Azzart Late night illustrator Senior Member

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    If jitter is a problem, frankly the only recent machine I would consider then is the cintiq companion. Even if it's not a laptop.
     
  10. doobiedoobiedum

    doobiedoobiedum Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    As I recall this model was never released in the UK.
    I also think for the best accuracy for professional work straight out of the box if you're converting from a graphic tablet and desktop pd to a tabletpc setup that you should look at a 2nd generation cintiq companion as you can then hook it up to a more powerful computer as necessary OR just go for the Wacom 13HD.
    If you had the time to learn the foibles of a tabletpc and how to work with them (drawing in the centre as much as possible etc rather than at the edges where accuracy can be a problem) then I'd look at the options available in the UK which tend not to be as wide as if you were in the US.
     
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