First Dual 4K@60HZ DisplayLink dock announced by Targus

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by kvoram, Dec 15, 2016.

  1. kvoram

    kvoram Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    711
    Likes Received:
    553
    Trophy Points:
    106
    Targus and DisplayLink have announced the first DisplayLink docking station capable of two simultaneous 4K@60Hz video outputs, the Targus Universal USB 3.0 DV4K Docking Station (DOCK160USZ), priced at 250 USD. Available starting Dec. 20, 2016.

    Sources: http://www.displaylink.com/newsroom...t-dual-uhd-4k2k-60hz-usb-docking-station--130
    http://www.targus.com/us/universal-usb-3-0-dv4k-docking-station-dock160usz

    Until now every DisplayLink dock on the market offered only 30Hz at a 4K/UHD resolution. DisplayLink has shown prototypes using their latest DL-6950 chipset over the past two years that offered multiple 4K@60Hz streams, but this is the first commercially available product with it.

    Here are the main specs:
    • Dual DisplayPort (DP 1.2a) or Dual HDMI (HDMI 2.0) video or one of each
    • Dual 4K Ultra HD video 4096x2160 60Hz (p60) 24 bpp with 6-Channel (5.1) Audio
    • 1x USB-C device port (USB 3.0 5Gbps data only)
    • 1x Gigabit Ethernet port for wired connectivity
    • 4x USB 3.0 ports for the latest peripherals (1x BC1.2 fast device-charging port at 7.5W)
    • 1x 3.5mm combo Audio In/Out port for mics, speakers, and earphones
    • Includes 1-meter USB-µB/M to A/M cable (detachable)
    • Includes 30W AC adapter
    • Ergonomic wedge design for comfortable typing
    • Integrated lock slot accommodates standard industry-security locks to safeguard equipment
    • Universal compatibility with the majority of laptop and PC tablet brands and platforms
    • Supported in Windows, Chrome, Mac OS X, Linux, and Android operating systems

    Many people here know how DisplayLink works, but for those that don't, a few words of caution:

    This is not the same as as a video adapter using your laptop/tablet's regular video outputs and it is not the same as those USB-C/TB3 docks/adapters that use the DisyplayPort Alternate Mode. DisplayLInk is a proprietary technology that works by simulating an additonal video output to the Operating System. Then using software and your CPU/GPU to heavily compress the video signal that the GPU generated so that it can be sent as a proprietary data signal over the much lower USB bandwidth to the connected dock. There the DisplayLink chipset in the dock then decompresses the signal again and generates a full video signal out of it again and sends it to the monitor(s).
    Two DP1.2a video signals have a bandwidth of roughly 40Gb/s, whereas this dock compresses it to under 5Gb/s, so roughly 1:8 compression.
    Because of this additional compression and lag, DisplayLink products are typically not well suited for high-res/high-quality video playback or games.
    Also, while this supports HDMI2.0, you won't get the benefits like HDR, only the 60Hz at 4K resolution.
    It remains to be seen (and reviewed) how well this one works, see some promotional demo below.

    A couple thoughts from myself:
    - Input connector is micro-USB 3.0 instead of USB-C, IMHO a bad idea. There is no good reason to continue to use micro-USB 3.0 and Targus even has a USB-C dock in that form factor already (http://www.targus.com/us/usb-c-universal-docking-station-dock410usz). Maybe they did it to avoid confusion that this would work like a USB-C dock, but still, bad product design decision.
    - As such, in the wake of USB-C docks capacle of power-through charging of your laptop, this also won't be capable of that. IMHO a missed chance.

    Promotion video of the tech, not the dock:


    Pictures:
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
    Marty likes this.
  2. Marty

    Marty Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,709
    Likes Received:
    955
    Trophy Points:
    131
    I am surprised DisplayLink didn't join the USB-C or WiDi consortium or something.

    In my opinion their tech is most valuable in low bandwidth situations, so low-end devices with USB-C that can't push a full DP1.2 connection and wireless video transmission where low latency, data compression techniques are crucial.
     
  3. kvoram

    kvoram Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    711
    Likes Received:
    553
    Trophy Points:
    106
    Actually, they are involved in these things. DisplayLink is a member of the USB-IF and is also a contributor to the USB-C specification, the USB 3.1 specification and the USB-Power Delivery 2.0/3.0 specifications.
     
  4. Marty

    Marty Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,709
    Likes Received:
    955
    Trophy Points:
    131
    Interesting, I didn't see them on the main main USB-IF page.

    I thought it was only the board that actually had any say in the USB-C physical spec. The rest of the "members" are just there to milk ($4000/year) and to "consult" (intermittently). :p


    Besides wouldn't any physical spec proposed by DisplayLink be redundant functionality with DP-alt mode anyways? I was thinking it was actually their software implementations that were valuable as whole, to the display industry.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2016
  5. kvoram

    kvoram Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    711
    Likes Received:
    553
    Trophy Points:
    106
    Yep, 100%. See for yourself in the contributor list at the beginning of the respective specification documents:
    http://www.usb.org/developers/docs/usb_31_120516.zip
    http://www.usb.org/developers/powerdelivery/USB_PD_v3.0_113016.zip

    It is of course kinda redundant with DP Alt Mode. It also creates additional confusion as some USB-C adapters and docks do not use DP Alt Mode but DisplayLink. Personally I would hope for DisplayLink to die so that there would be less fragmentation. If DP Alt Mode would fully replace DisplayLink products, they would essentially go bankrupt.

    USB-IF is not an exclusive club, anyone who adopts USB technology in their products can join and then of course also influence them. Currently there are 923 members: https://www.usb.org/members_landing/directory?complex_search_companies=1
     
  6. Marty

    Marty Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,709
    Likes Received:
    955
    Trophy Points:
    131
    Does "kvoram" mean "destroyer of companies" where you're from? :p


    (But actually I kinda agree :D, I think DisplayLink should focus on wireless solutions.)
     
    kvoram likes this.
  7. kvoram

    kvoram Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    711
    Likes Received:
    553
    Trophy Points:
    106
    Hehe, if so, I would swing my hammer at Synaptics pens and touchpads as well. I don't mean for people to lose their jobs but some things we should just get rid off for all our sakes.

    With the arrival of DP Alt Mode it is just annoying for a clearly inferior technology to create additional chaos in the market. It would be much better to know that every USB-C video adapter/dock uses the no-compromise DP Alt Mode instead of hunting down spec sheets and trying to get some info form the manufactuer only to find out that some product uses only DisplayLink. This of course would force more device manufacturers to include DP Alt Mode with their USB-C ports.
     
  8. Marty

    Marty Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,709
    Likes Received:
    955
    Trophy Points:
    131
    Kvoram's Hammer...a suitably terrifying-sounding implement of tech purification.

    (Honestly 'kvoram' does sound some Lawful Evil god I'd find while playing Baldur's Gate something... :D)

    But man, if you killed Synaptics you would create a serious industry vacuum: a little know fact, is that Synaptics, the maker of all the the trackpads that everyone hates, is also the maker of Apple Trackpads that everyone loves.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2016
  9. kvoram

    kvoram Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    711
    Likes Received:
    553
    Trophy Points:
    106
    Hmmh, I'll admit I don't have much experience with Apple's touchpads to make an informed personal judgment. This makes me wonder if it they are loved because of better hardware, better software or just Apple's reality distortion field... :confused:
     
  10. Marty

    Marty Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,709
    Likes Received:
    955
    Trophy Points:
    131
    I believe it's the Apple drivers and the strict firmware and component specifications it places on Synaptics.

    But personally, I think all trackpads are inferior to the IBM "pointing stick". I use a Thinkpad Compact USB keyboard like you (I have both wired and wireless versions) ;)

    So I actually wouldn't mind if you "Kvoram'd" the whole trackpad industry, we need more IBM style keyboards, haha. :p
     
Loading...

Share This Page