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Discussion in 'Hardware' started by kurt corbin, Sep 3, 2019.

  1. kurt corbin

    kurt corbin Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Last edited: May 24, 2020
  2. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    I've not taken a screen apart recently, so I don't know exactly what modern design solutions are in style right now, but a few years ago, there would be a whole extra board to handle the backlight, and you could see where it was and the wires it used to connect to the light/s.

    I would imagine that today, the video and backlight controller, (and who knows what else), would all be integrated with laptops and tablets.

    But yeah, the LCD and signal controller have nothing to do with the backlight. That's somebody else's department.

    Unless, of course, we're talking about OLED, (where each pixel is its own light source) in which case there would have to be a completely different design going on. I would imagine that brightness control through PWM on OLED would be the preferred (easier) way to go. Samsung is apparently known for using it as their main strategy. I keep my tablet on 100% brightness, though, I would also imagine that this wont be a solution as new techniques come along, (where PWM may be used regionally on some parts of the screen which want to display shadows even while the whole screen brightness is technically set to 100%.)

    Basically, I really like IPS screens, and will stick with them for the most part if able.

    Our Tech Overlords want us all to be zombies eventually. :)
     
  3. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Yeah.., anybody interested for long enough in what's going on "under the hood" will have run into that road block before. The wonderful Internet provides an ocean of information.., except for when it comes to industrial proprietary parts and patent secrets and stuff they just don't feel like sharing out of house. Other bits of information you can get, but only if you're tagged in the engineering community and know people who can share documents on private and semi-private networks. (For instance, just yesterday, I was curious and wanted to get hold of a copy of the international standard regarding nanometer light wavelengths for different colors as they pertain to industrial lighting and LEDs. Everywhere I looked, you have to pay more than $100 for a copy of the .pdf file! No thanks; I'm not that curious.)

    Anyway, with OLED, I haven't done any research, but if the same engineering techniques apply, then you'd probably get boards where the manufacturer has integrated control chips into the screen.

    I know when I was buying IPS screens on their own, they would always come with a floppy bit of plastic attached which had complicated surface mounted control chips stuck to it. That was attached to the edge or on the reverse side of the glass screen. The computer's video controler board would then plug into that with a standard cable connector. This would imply that the screen is in charge of how everything works and the controller board just sends what it wants displayed.

    Now in the new era of OLED.., I would imagine that if a company like Razer wants to do something different wrt brightness control, that they would give their specifications to their supplier, (to Samsung, for instance), and then Samsung's in house engineers would produce the electronics necessary to satisfy the customer's requirements, and then deliver the product.

    For those of us on the outside of this industrial marvel, we have to look for scraps of information which trickle down, and perform our little video flicker tests with cameras and such. There are some dedicated websites which deal exclusively with the PWM and flicker question, and some of those guys have probably been at it long enough to have made contacts deeper within engineering circles than the casual explorer has access to, but I haven't checked recently.

    I'm sure that by the time I'm back in the market for a non-flicker screen, the technology will have evolved beyond where it is today and the problems will be all shiny and new, requiring new paths of exploration to be bushwhacked!
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2019
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