Dual-Booting Linux on C-140X

Discussion in 'Acer (Gateway)' started by playersnoopy, Sep 6, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Iceman

    Iceman Pen Pal - Newbie

    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    5
    Ok, I'm new to Linux/Unix, I want to dual-boot so that I can experiment with Linux, but not really mess thing up too bad and until I figure it out be able to use Windows XP. I'd appreciate any help you can offer.
     
  2. playersnoopy

    playersnoopy Pen Pal - Newbie

    Messages:
    76
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    adding Linux on top of XP is easy, just pop in a linux version you want and boot from the dvd and it'll take care of everything through step by step. Going in reverse is more tricky. Just like dual booting Vista on top of XP is easy but adding Vista on top of XP is tricky.

    But with the C-140X processing capabilities, if you're looking to just experiment then I'd suggest running some virtualization software and install linux in that environment. Only draw back is that everything will be a slightly slower when running but the benefits far outweigh that. Since you can't mess up your current installation of XP and everything stays in tack, plus you can have access to both OS at once instead of rebooting. VirtualPC 2007 from Microsoft is a free software and works fine for the most part, unless you're on Vista 64, I'm having some issues running fedora within it. VMWare is one of my favorites and then you have Parallels which is a nice little tool.
     
  3. Iceman

    Iceman Pen Pal - Newbie

    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    5
    Thanks, Im gonna go the virtual PC route for now, any recommendations on what version of Linux I should use?
     
  4. playersnoopy

    playersnoopy Pen Pal - Newbie

    Messages:
    76
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    well there are tons of flavors but for beginners you might want to go with something like Fedora or openSUSE, Fedora is basically redhat's version of open source and openSUSE is from Novell. Both are very user friendly trying to give you the sense of using something like a Windows environment. I personally like the blue look and feel of Fedora, and their new version is nice.
     
  5. chriscannon

    chriscannon Proud Member of the PFJ! Senior Member

    Messages:
    905
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    31
    what about ubuntu? my friend said that ubuntu is supposed to be good.

    I personally havent tried linux, but im trying to find a junky laptop that i can format and install linux on it. Mostly for a learning experience. If I can learn how to be a real hacker then thats just a plus! ;)
     
  6. playersnoopy

    playersnoopy Pen Pal - Newbie

    Messages:
    76
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    hackers tend to favor ubuntu :D

    they all do the same thing, for beginners it's always easier to go with something like redhat.
     
  7. chriscannon

    chriscannon Proud Member of the PFJ! Senior Member

    Messages:
    905
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    31
    do you know what makes each one different? Why is ubuntu better for hacking? why is redhat best for starters? does anyone have any screenshots?

    Its something I really want to learn, but I have very limited resources and dont want to end up dual booting. I would rather have a junker computer set aside JUST for that reason.
     
  8. playersnoopy

    playersnoopy Pen Pal - Newbie

    Messages:
    76
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    There's little to no real difference, the core linux kernel are all similar it's basically all the add on packages that make them different. Start with any of them and pick one you like.
     
  9. chriscannon

    chriscannon Proud Member of the PFJ! Senior Member

    Messages:
    905
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Is it mostly for looks? or do different ones have different features, or commands?
     
  10. DRR

    DRR Pen Pal - Newbie

    Messages:
    66
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    I have run Kubuntu for years and feel it would be great for beginners. FYI - ubuntu uses the gnome desktop, kubuntu uses KDE desktop and xubuntu uses xfce which is very efficient on older less powerful hardware. Like an old retired PC. My sense is that KDE is preferred by hackers and gnome is better for noobies. All of them have the synaptic GUI that is like an online catalog for automatically downloading and installing any of hundreds of applications to try them out and then to delete the ones you aren't interested any more. Also, Chris, the VMWare and VirtualPC mentioned earlier make it possible to run both OSes simultaneously. As opposed to a dual boot.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page