Disassembly of the Fujitsu LifeBook T4200 Series Tablet PC

Discussion in 'Fujitsu' started by SimsHsia, Jul 14, 2008.

  1. SimsHsia

    SimsHsia "I will do science to it" Senior Member

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    This guide is mirrored (mostly) over at this blog. The pictures are also a bit more clearer as a thumbnail, however the default font size may be a bit too small for some.

    This disassembly guide is a primer on how to disassemble the Fujitsu LifeBook T4200 Series Tablet PC to get to the Socket P socketed processor so one can upgrade from a “Merom” 65nm processor to a “Penryn” 45nm processor, reapply thermal grease, clean out the heatsink and fan, and so forth. This guide will not go in to specific details on how to a.) replace the processor and ensure stable operation; b.) remove and reapply the thermal grease; or c.) clean the heatsink — it is simply a basis to get access to the processor, what you do from there is up to you. This guide is applicable to the Fujitsu LifeBook T4210, T4215, and the T4220 as these models all use the same chassis, but may be also applicable to previous and possibly future generations of the Fujitsu LifeBook T4000 series line. And, now for some friendly reminders:

    Notices and Warnings

    Notice: This will void your manufacturer warranty, make sure you are willing to accept that any mishaps during disassembly of your system will void it.

    Warning: This guide is also not for the faint of heart, in any disassembly there is a risk that you may damage system components. It is your responsibility and ultimately your choice to proceed with the following guide and its steps. I must admit that I had a couple of close calls of possibly damaging something, it’s a risk that one must take, even when documenting a disassembly guide.

    Warning: Electrostatic discharge (ESD) kills sensitive components like the one found in your Tablet PC or any other system. Remember to ground yourself before touching any component or wear an antistatic wrist wrap at all times when dealing with computer components.

    Warning: You can not undo any of your actions when disassembling if any system component is damaged. Like the first warning, make sure you are willing to risk disassembling your system because opening up your system will void your warranty. If only life was as easy as doing a Ctrl-Z. :)

    Right, now that we’ve gotten through that, let the disassembly begin!

    What you’ll need

    • An antistatic wrap or an object so you can ground yourself from static electricity
    • 50mm or 75mm Phillips Screwdriver
    • 50mm or 75mm Flathead Screwdriver (or something thin and flat)
    • Jumper or 3-prong compress & expand tweezers (optional, but helps getting screws out of tight spaces)
    • Paper (optional)
    • Pen or Pencil (optional)

    Planning

    I recommend that you have a pen or pencil and paper ready because its easy to loose track of which screws goes into which. As you see in the image below, I’m taking no chances with ending up with a few screws that belong somewhere in my Tablet PC. I’ve dissembled quite a few notebooks, and always ended up with one to three extra screws. You don’t have to do this, but it doesn’t hurt to know which screw goes where.

    [​IMG]

    Disassembly

    Caution: Take it easy when removing the screws, you’re trying not to strip the screw. If the screw driver slips while your loosening the screw, reposition it and slowly turn it to loosen the screw. It may feel like it’ll take an eternity to remove a screw out of many screws, but for screws this small, it’s better to take it easy than stripping it.

    1. Remove the weight saver, battery, or optical drive from the modular bay.
    2. Remove the main battery.
      [​IMG]
    3. This step is optional, but remove all memory modules from the memory compartment and place them aside, preferably far away from where you are dissembling your system.
      [​IMG]
    4. Remove the two screws from the hard drive compartment door.
      [​IMG]
    5. Remove the hard drive compartment door and pull the HDD ribbon connector upwards.
      [​IMG][​IMG]
    6. Pull the hard drive up by pulling the black tab then remove the hard drive.
      [​IMG]
    7. Remove three screws (with arrow icon) near the hinge.
      [​IMG]
    8. Next, remove the two screws behind the hinge.
      [​IMG]
    9. Now, to remove the keyboard: following [post=95398]kureshii’s excellent guide[/post] (and since I didn’t take pictures of this process because it requires both hands) to remove the keyboard plate and the keyboard itself.
      1. The long strip, which kureshii calls the “keyboard lock” (and I’ll refer to it as the “keyboard plate” for consistency), below the display and above the keyboard is what we’re going to remove first. Gently pry with a flathead screwdriver (or something thin and flat) both the left and right side of the plate (marked accordingly) and slide toward the middle of the plate. It’ll help to press down a couple of the top row keys so the center screw shaft is free. Once the middle of the keyboard plate is free, remove it and move on to the next step.
        [​IMG]
        Photo used by permission from kureshii.
      2. You are now free to slide out the back plate.
        [​IMG]
      3. Slowly pull the keyboard away from you until the lower tabs of the keyboard near you are free from the chassis. Slowly rise the entire keyboard upwards about half an inch, and detach the keyboard data ribbon. Don’t yank at it, but just enough so that it is detached.
    10. Now, on to the bottom of the Tablet PC, there are 15 total screws to remove as outlined in the picture below.
      [​IMG]
      1. As outlined above, don’t forget about the three screws in the modular bay.
        [​IMG]
      2. OK, I lied when I said there were 15 screws to remove, actually there are 16 total for this step (not including the three you already removed in step 7). Look in the battery compartment bay and find the screw next to the label “M2TPx5.5″ and remove it.
        [​IMG]
    11. Great, now carefully flip the Tablet PC over and open the display. In the area where you would normally see the rotation arrow indicators, you’ll see that there’s a circuit board held in by a screw. Remove that screw, then gently pull it upwards and remove the RIGHT wire connector FROM it, and remove the LEFT wire connector FROM the MOTHERBOARD. This will make it easier to know which one connector goes into which when it comes to reassembling the Tablet PC.
      [​IMG]
    12. In the same area where you removed the rotation indicator board, you’ll need to remove the LCD display cable (white) and the Wacom serial cable (black).
      [​IMG]
    13. Now to remove the touchpad data ribbon cable, located near the touchpad, by pulling the green connector with a finger upwards. When it is as depicted in the picture, you can easily slide the ribbon out.
      [​IMG]
    14. Now, remove the three screws labeled “M2X3″.
    15. As shown below, slowly peel both of the black tapes just enough so the Bluetooth wires can freely move. Carefully pull out the two antenna wires on the wireless card (blue circles). You don’t have to eject the wireless card from its slot, but if you have to press both of the tabs (red squares) to the left, and then gently lift the wireless card up and out of the slot. If you’ve installed laptop memory before, this process is the same. For reference: the black wireless antenna wire goes on top, the grayish one on the bottom. (If you have Bluetooth installed, remove those wires as well and remove the module.)
      [​IMG]
    16. Next, to the right of the heat vent fan, remove the wire from the motherboard. When reassembling, be sure to reattach this cable or else your system will overheat quickly!
      [​IMG]
    17. Now, we remove three more screws. One screw is near the wire you just removed in the previous step, the remaining two screws are the only ones still holding the hinge.
      [​IMG]
    18. Now, you can lift the display up and away and to the side. Watch the wireless antenna wires and the one temperature probe when sliding the display out. They go with the display, so make sure they don't get caught on anything.
    19. OK, almost there! Remove both the entire wrist area and the heat shield (the sheet metal portion) away. Tada! You now have access to the vital parts of your Tablet PC’s motherboard.
    20. Now, you’ll need to remove 5 screws to remove the heatsink and the fan. Then it’s easy to lift the entire assembly away.
      [​IMG]
    21. You now have access to the processor. What you do from here is up to what you plan to do once you have disassembled your Tablet PC. If you’re planning to upgrade from a Merom processor to a Penryn processor (a Merom to another Merom or a Penryn to another Penryn) take a flathead screw driver and rotate turn the dial from the lock symbol to the unlock symbol and carefully pull the CPU out of the socket. Reverse the steps but with a new processor. If you’re planning to reapply the thermal grease, there are many guides on the Internet which will show you which thermal grease to buy (if you haven’t already) and how to apply it on the processor and the chipset (which also has thermal grease). Or, if you’re just curious to see what’s under the hood, well, that’s fine too.
      [​IMG]

    Reverse the steps when reassembling, do a test run by going into the BIOS (press Enter when you see FUJITSU, use the arrow keys to go to BIOS Setup) and make sure everything runs fine and that the processor and installed RAM are recognized.

    I hope you enjoy this guide on how to diassemble your Fujitsu LifeBook T4200 Series Tablet PC, this is my first diassembly guide, so I certainly hope this will be a great resource for those who have this Tablet PC.

    Thanks

    Thanks to kureshii for allowing me to use his one picture from his keyboard removal guide, to the members of the TPCR community, and to the forum lurker who somehow manages to find this guide.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 16, 2015
  2. Frank

    Frank Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Wow, great done, and very detailed.
    Don't know, but I think the T2010 is easier to open :)

    It's funny to see the T4220's heat sink. The T2010 has a large heat sink between the CPU, North- and Southbridge, the T4220 instead only cools down the CPU and Northbridge, no southbridge, strange.
     
  3. kureshii

    kureshii Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    1 more year before I have no warranty to speak of and can open up my Fuji without reserve =)

    Nice guide! I actually have a more detailed and easier disassembly guide for step 9 over here, feel free to use pictures from it if you like.
     
  4. SimsHsia

    SimsHsia "I will do science to it" Senior Member

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    Thanks Frank and kureshii. :)

    I added another thing to worry about in step 18 -- primarily the two wifi antennas and CPU temperature probe that go with the display (minus the display and Wacom serial cables) when you remove it from the Tablet PC, I'll get on editing the guide to include three pictures from kureshii's guide for removing the keyboard lock/plate and edit it in later today.
     
  5. Rieuk

    Rieuk Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Is it possible to replace the LCD screen with another one?
    I have the XGA display (on a T4215) and wish to upgrade it to SXGA+. I plan to get this to do it with.

    The only issue is whether the existing GPU will be able to handle the increased resolution. Or is this independent of the GPU and only dependent on the display capability?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 18, 2015
  6. kureshii

    kureshii Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I don't think the GPU would have any issue with that. But you'll have to make sure the physical interface is the same and basically verify that they can communicate with each other, and then there's the device drivers to worry about...

    I hope you succeed though, because I'm thinking of doing that myself ;)
     
  7. SuperFlyBoy

    SuperFlyBoy Scribbler - Standard Member

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  8. SimsHsia

    SimsHsia "I will do science to it" Senior Member

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    Hi SuperFlyBoy,

    That's a specialized tool that can crack open the LCD bezel to replace the LCD, remedy the latch, etc. If you'd rather go with the free alternative, I just used a plastic ruler and some folded paper and was very, very careful while cracking it open. As for the keyboard plate, I used a small flathead screw driver to pry it up and slide it toward me to remove it. :)
     
  9. RocketScientist

    RocketScientist Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Hi folks,

    I just replaced the fan in my T4220 with the help of the guide above (thanks Simshsia!). This guide was almost perfect, and it gave me the possibility of doing this myself with some level of reduced risk, and saved me a lot of money in the process.

    I thought I would pass on some amendments and addendums to the guide that weren't available for my configuration, and hopefully help some other folks when they replace a fan as well.

    Getting Fujitsu to Replace the Fan
    I thought that I would have Fujitsu just do this for some cheap cost, and avoid taking the risk myself. Man I was naive! The company quoted me a cost of $555.50 (or so)! To replace a fan. Needless to say that baffled me. The excuse I got for the cost (both from calling them and emailing them) was that it was "soldered," so the "entire thing would be replaced." Presumably they meant that the fan and heatsink were soldered to the motherboard. This is absolutely FALSE. I could not believe (and still can't) that they lied so blatantly on something so easily checked (thanks to this guide!). Needless to say, I am going to have to warn people about Fujitsu service from now on.

    Where to get the fan:
    The model number was CA49008-0271 (CPU fan for Fujitsu A E N S T Series).
    Note that there are two fans that are almost identical, but are for different configurations of (A E N S T) Series, so check your configuration number! Mine began with "A1A." I found my fan on Ebay for $56.65 (with shipping) from "lifebookpartshere." This seller shipped the part the next day, and I got it in about a week. The fan itself has the part number: "MCF-S6055AM05" and the following: DC 5V, 330 mA, made by Toshiba Home Technology Corporation.

    Addendums to the guide
    I recommend setting aside about 5 hours to complete this guide the first time (including reassembly). This is just because you really want to be cautious!

    Step 3: Removing the Keyboard
    Just a note here, because I terrified myself before I relaxed and was able to examine the connector closely. The keyboard has a ribbon connector, as stated. This means that there is no plastic piece on the keyboard side of the connector, the ribbon just ends in a stiffened plastic section (the male side of the connection). The female side (a big black rectangle) is attached to the motherboard, so don't think that it is removable. I had a fair bit of trouble removing the ribbon at first, because this is a pressure-fit connector, so it has no little moving plastic pieces that release or grip the ribbon. When it finally came loose, I was terrified that I had pulled the ribbon from some plastic connector that should have been on the end, similar to the Wacom tablet connector described in the guide, but nope! Stay cool and keep going.

    Step 9: Removing the keyboard
    A quick note here. It was not clear in the guide, but there is a second plastic piece that runs around the hinge in the back, with "arms" that extend underneath the "keyboard plate." This piece is screwed into place with the three screws that are removed from underneath in Step 7. When you put it back together, don't neglect this piece! You may have to push it in towards the hinge while you are screwing those screws in Step 7 back in, in order for the threads to engage. This apparently also secures the center part of the keyboard plate.

    Step 17: The present guide has you remove a screw that is just below the fan cable connector. On my laptop, this is one of THREE screws that hold down the heat shield. I did not have to remove this screw until I removed the heatshield. Once the heatshield is exposed, this screw, and two more (one in the upper left, another in the center bottom) can be removed. All three are marked with arrows pointing to them inscribed into the heatshield, so they are easy to find. If you have the bluetooth card, as described below, then you need to detach that before removing the heatshield as well.

    Tools
    Unfortunately I don't have a full set of metric screwdrivers, but I managed to borrow one from work that was close. I also found that my Leatherman Wave has a Phillips Head screwdriver that is almost perfect for these screws! It is long enough to reach the recessed ones, and otherwise fits very well. Some care is required, because again it isn't quite perfect, and next time I do this I will buy a proper set.

    I would recommend having some electrical tape handy to retape the cables, and to replace two pieces of tape on the fan (more on that in the fan-replacement section below).

    The recommended tweezers were also VERY helpful! There are lots of tiny screws and small places, so these were great! I just used a standard pair usually found in drugstores and first aid kits.

    Differences with my configuration
    The only difference that I saw between mine and the one used to make the guide is that I have Bluetooth and the Intel wireless card (A/B/G).

    This adds two additional antenna wires beyond what was described above, and one additional ribbon connector. The wireless card has THREE (not 2 as in the guide), with a black cable on antenna port 1 (on the wireless card), a BLUE cable attached to antenna port 2, and a grey cable on port 3. The black and grey cables are exactly as described in the guide. The blue cable runs from the wireless card, under the monitor swivel mount, and into the upper right corner of the case, presumably to handle the G antenna.

    The Bluetooth cable adds a card that is mounted to the heat shield just below the wireless card, and just to the right of the fan's motherboard plug. This chip has a WHITE antenna cable going into it. The Bluetooth card has an additional ribbon cable connector that runs from the motherboard into the left side of the card. This ribbon connector disconnects from the BLUETOOTH chip side very easily. The female connect of the ribbon (on the bluetooth card) has a brown plastic piece that you slide to the left to release the cable, and slide back to secure it. Both must be detached before you remove the heatshield.

    Replacing the Fan
    Once you have completed Step 20 (removing the five screws on the heatsink/fan mount), you can remove the combined fan and heatsink. There are two additional screws that hold the fan to the heatsink. There are easily removed, of course. There are also three two additional pieces of tape and a length of rubbery, sticky "stuff." One piece of black electrical tape run along the fan output/heatsink interface on the bottom of the fan/heatsink. On the reverse side, there is a thin length of rubbery, sticky stuff that covers the same interface between the fan output and heatsink (This is on the metal side of the fan). You will have to remove and reuse this stuff. Both the black piece of tape and this rubbery stuff just keeps the airflow from leaving the heatsink before it exits the laptop. The rubbery bit may also be padding. The third piece of tape is on the lower part of the fan output. It covers a section where the fan extends beyond the heatsink. This tape is a very thick, semi-transparent tape that should also be reused. This section is covered by an aluminum piece when the fan/heatsink assembly is mounted, so presumably this tape is there to reduce vibration and noise, and help keep the air flowing correctly.

    Finally, the fan cable is also taped to the fan housing near the connector. Retape this as well, it keeps the cable neat, and might prevent it from vibrating too much as well.

    Notes on Connectors
    There are a LOT of different kinds of connectors in this process! If you aren't familiar with a wide range of connectors, I highly recommend that you go very slowly during disassembly, and examine each connector closely before you start yanking on it. For example, ribbon connectors can be pressure fit, and may or may not have little movable plastic components that release the ribbon. Determine which side is male/female before yanking on it!

    The antenna wires are both relatively unusual (unless you have seen lots of small coaxial cabling) and somewhat delicate. In this laptop, the "male" coax connector is the smaller of the two sides, and is mounted on the circuit boards. This connect has a copper ring and a small wire poking of the middle. This is very similar to the bigger coax wire that you have in your TV antenna, but without the screw threads, its just pressure fit. The female coax end is on the wires, and goes over the top of the male end, completely covering it except for a very thing white plastic base. I found that pulling up gently on the cable, inserting a very thin flathead screwdriver between the bottom of the female end and the base of the male end, and twisting the screwdriver gently will pop the connector off somewhat easily.


    I have some picture relevant to the above stuff, but I really need to actually work today, so I will have to post those later.

    I hope my addendums help, and thank you again for this great guide. You saved me $500!
     
  10. iammcse

    iammcse Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Upgraded CPU to t9300 but I cracked the plastic on the top of th keyboard.
     
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