Dell XPS 13 9365 2-in-1

Discussion in 'Dell' started by kvoram, Jan 3, 2017.

  1. kvoram

    kvoram Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Well, it looks like this year's CES is bringins some new discussion-worthy devices. Dell is joining the fray with the first ultra-slim bezel 2-in-1 with the XPS13 9365 2-in-1 Convertible and their first tablet with a 3:2 ratio, the Latitude 5285.

    Let's exchange some thoughts, but first the basics, here is the Dell XPS13 2-in-1:

    Prices go from $999 (i5-Y, FHD, 4GB, 128GB) to $2049 (i7-Y, QHD+, 16GB, 1TB)

    Processor Options
    7th Generation Intel® Core™ i5-7Y54 processor (4M Cache, up to 3.2 GHz)
    7th Generation Intel® Core™ i7-7Y75 processor (4M Cache, up to 3.6 GHz)​
    Graphics
    Intel® HD Graphics 615​
    Display options
    13.3-inch UltraSharp Quad HD+ (3200x1800) InfinityEdge touch display
    13.3-inch FHD (1920 x 1080) InfinityEdge touch display
    400-nits, 1000:1 contrast ratio, 72% color gamut, anti-reflective
    170° wide viewing angle - 85° / 85° / 85° / 85°
    Capacitive touchscreen – 10-finger touch support​
    Memory Options
    4GB, 8GB or 16GB Dual Channel LPDDR3 SDRAM at 1866MHz (On Board)​
    SSD options
    128GB SATA, 256GB PCIe, 512GB PCIe, 1TB PCIe SSD with Intel® RST​
    Keyboard / Touchpad
    Full size, backlit chiclet keyboard; 1.3mm travel
    Precision touchpad, seamless glass integrated button​
    Pen support
    Dell Active Pen with 2048 pressure sensitivity - Dell PN556W (Wacom AES)​
    Wireless connectivity
    Intel® Dual Band Wireless-AC + Bluetooth 4.2
    Miracast™ capable
    Intel® Smart Connect Technology*​
    Audio
    Stereo speakers professionally tuned with Waves MaxxAudio® Pro
    1W x 2 = 2W total​
    Webcam
    Widescreen HD (720p) webcam with dual array digital microphones​
    Fingerprint reader
    Microsoft Hello compliant fingerprint reader​
    Ports and connectors
    Thunderbolt™ 3 with PowerShare, DC-In & DisplayPort (1); USB-C 3.1 with PowerShare, DC-In & DisplayPort (1); microSD card reader, headset jack (1), Noble lock slot (1)
    Thunderbolt™ 3 supports: Power in / charging, PowerShare, Thunderbolt 3 (40Gbps bidirectional), USB 3.1 Gen 2 (10Gbps), VGA, HDMI, Ethernet and USB-A via Dell Adapter (sold separately)​
    Battery
    46WHr battery (built-in)*
    *Battery is built-in to the laptop and is not replaceable by the customer.​
    AC adapter
    30W AC adapter​
    Construction
    CNC machined aluminum in silver
    Edge-to-edge Corning® Gorilla® Glass NBT™
    Carbon fiber composite palm rest with soft touch paint
    Steel hinges wrapped in aluminum​
    Dimensions
    Height: 0.32-0.54” (8 -13.7 mm) / Width: 11.98” (304 mm) / Depth: 7.8”(199mm)
    Starting at weight 2.7 pounds (1.24 kg)​

    BATTERY LIFE BENCHMARKS (according to Dell)

    Intel Core i5 processor, FHD display, 4GB memory, 128GB SSD:
    MobileMark 2014: Up to 15 hours
    Netflix Streaming Video Playback: Up to 10 hours, 21 minutes​
    Intel Core i7 processor, QHD+ display, 16GB memory, 1TB SSD:
    MobileMark 2014: Up to 8 hours, 35 minutes
    Netflix Streaming Video Playback: Up to 7 hours, 12 minutes


    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2017
  2. madhatter2012

    madhatter2012 Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Thanks for posting this. Im thinking of getting one of these. Been putting off buying another laptop for a while now and i wanted pen also. Is this Wacom AES?
     
  3. jedah

    jedah Pen Pal - Newbie

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    This looks really sexy. I'm also in the market for a new laptop w/ pen support. I'll wait for the reviews to see how the new Y-series (aka Core M) performs. Very interesting CES so far indeed. Lenovo, Dell, and HP all seem to have interesting offering w/ pen support.
     
  4. ATIVQ

    ATIVQ V⅁O⅄ Senior Member

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  5. kvoram

    kvoram Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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  6. ATIVQ

    ATIVQ V⅁O⅄ Senior Member

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    They're getting some really high scores; did Dell give them special test units? Thermal throttling is a huge issue with U and Y processors, maybe their unit allowed the CPU to run hot, say 90°c instead of the usual 70°c. Or, could be the thermals on the XPS 13 are really, really good.

    The reviewer pretty much quotes the marketing copy about the thermal throttling. Maybe they even got their Geekbench scores from the marketing department...

    Here's a public Geekbench score for the XPS 13 9365. Not saying this one is the "right" one, but it's 30% lower than what the review quotes. I'm sure once people start getting this product in their hands we'll have more benchmarks and we'll have a better grip of typical i-Y performance.
     
  7. kvoram

    kvoram Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    It is worth pointing out that the Geekbench score you linked is of an i7-7Y75. So it looks like that one struggles more with thermal throttling. The LaptopMag review already said that their i5-7Y54 device got "somewhat toasty".

    But we would certainly need more benchmarks, and I don't like Geekbench that much. And of course we need to know if/when throttling occurred to put those numbers in a proper context.

    I wish Intel would mandate some specific cooling requirements, so we could get a better grip of how a Y or U CPU works in device X without having to analyze reviews.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2017
  8. madhatter2012

    madhatter2012 Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Well, I hope this thing turns out good. I was just getting ready to buy the XPS 13 but wanted something with a pen as well, suddenly saw this and it was a dream come true so I'll be pretty disappointed if it ends up being bad. Also, I'd like to pull trigger as soon as possible so I hope the reviews start flowing in soon.

    Regarding the Pen, I did hear something about MS and Wacom coming up with a 4096 pressure level pen with tilt, but I don't know the details like when it's coming out or what it's going to work with. I know the new Bamboo Smart is supposed to be cross-platform, though.
     
  9. blarbles

    blarbles Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I just bought the Dell XPS 13 9365 2-in-1, 1080P i7 16GB ram version.

    I bought 1080P for the better battery life.

    I've owned Surface Pro 2, Variety of Apple laptops, Samsung, etc. This is the first device that, on paper, looked to be exactly what I wanted. A small 70-75% laptop 30-35% tablet without 2 devices.

    My observations:

    • Content adaptive brightness, at least on the 1080p model, cannot be turned off. Dell tech support confirmed this saying it was working as intended. They did bump this up to tier 3 support and are asking the product management group to see if they expect a patch/setting option in the future to turn this off. I find it annoying. The brightness changes based on the content on the screen not ambient brightness. Going to Power settings and turning of adaptive brightness does not fix this. This is especially noticeable on the lower brightness settings. It does it during video playback too which I think is terribly short sighted on their part.
    • Fingerprint scanner works as fast as my iPhone. It is a nice way to login and seems robust so far.
    • It looks lighter than it is, if that makes any sense. I know it is lighter than other laptops, and once I pick those up I feel the difference but for some reason it visually looks lighter than it is.
    • Never has gotten too hot to touch, and is fanless so no noise which is great.
    • It has cable whine when plugged in. I have not heard it yet when it is not plugged in, but only have had it 2 days. It's fairly soft, but noticeable in a quiet room. The noise doesn't happen unless the computer is doing something (scrolling, loading, opening, saving, etc).
    • It has a weird bug where if it goes to sleep in one network environment and wakes up in another it will say it connected to WiFi but has no network access. Turning WiFi off or running Windows repair network connection tool fixes it. Windows network tool says Gateway not available in the repair tool. This MAY have happened after being asleep for a long time (12+ hours) in the same network location but I have to confirm this.
    • Build quality is very good except for the slightest bow on the left front of the laptop. It is not enough to be annoying during typing, but it clearly does not sit completely flat. I tried on multiple surfaces. Rest of the build quality is great.
    • Sometimes thinks it is in tablet mode when it is in laptop mode when waking it up. This is not common, but it has happened more than once.
    • Power adapter is USB-C 30 watt and very small.
    • Can't comment much on battery life except to say installing applications and messing with settings probably got me 6-7 hours out of the box charge which was down to 80%. It claims fully charged it has 15 hours left.
    • Sleeping overnight it did not lose any noticeable battery life, which, for me, is a huge improvement compared to other Windows devices I've owned.

    I'm still deciding if I am going to keep it or return it with really the Content Adaptive Brightness being the show stopper. I can handle the rest with the expectation I or Dell could figure out the network issues I described above eventually.
     
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  10. kvoram

    kvoram Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    @blarbles Thanks a lot for your detailed insights. For better or worse, the issues you describe pretty much guarantee I won't be getting one.

    The fact that Dell is still forcing Content Adaptive Brightnes Control (CABC) on their FHD customers is a shame. That kind of sneaky, cheating behaviour to closer match battery life to their advertised specs and/or push people towards the UHD+ model, where it can be disabled (at least in the past), is outright customer-hostile.
    It may not be as bad as VW's diesel emissions cheating, but in my opinion it goes int he same direction.
    Oh, and coil whine on a $1000+ laptop is just ridiculous. Coil whine is basically the result of poor engineering and/or being a cheap skate. That may be acceptable on some cheap electronics one buys for a few bucks at the supermarket, but IMHO it should be completely avoided on such an expensive device.
    The other hardware/firmware issues with networking and the bow of the case are then only the icing on the (wrecked) cake.

    I hope you you will resolve your problems, whether yours is getting fixed or by getting something else. But personally if I ever come to close to getting one, I will make sure beforehand those issues don't exist anymore.
     
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