Dell teases Surface Studio and Dial clone

Discussion in 'Dell' started by surfaceproartist, Nov 2, 2016.

  1. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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    Nice video, although I got the impression that there was supposed to be narration, but there was no sound.

    Of course, then I noticed that my earbuds were unplugged...!
     
  2. Cuberdon75

    Cuberdon75 Pen Pal - Newbie

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    This is great... There's a dearth of you tube content on this.
     
  3. Marty

    Marty Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    That was super interesting, kudos!

    I like the overhead angle. It's very intimate, sort of like Glen Keane's amazing "draw & talk-a-longs": :)



    But your setup has the major advantage of zero distortion, allowing you to see the art better; in addition to the usual advantages of allowing you to gesture with your hands, see the stylus in motion, and bring in physical objects like your printed comic book! :thumbsup:

    One small suggestion is maybe adding (very soft) ambient lighting so the contrast between the screen and bezel is not as glaring. I think a soft beige color light would work best to reduce some of the harshness.

    Also I have a question, did you come up with each panel composition totally on-the-fly? I've never thought about doing layout purely based on text positioning, but that is really neat concept. I learned something!
     
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  4. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Thanks for the feedback. I totally agree. And man, lighting is a lot more challenging than this layman ever figured on. Basically, whenever I'd tried to fly by the seat of my box of closet junk and hardware, the result looked grainy and underlit.

    I'm finally biting the bullet and installing real gear. Hopefully my next shot will look better.

    I have two approaches to panel layouts; for Stardrop, I wanted to do a humor strip, so I write the scripts first and do the layouts around those. It morphed into more than just a gag comic, but I kept the production style because it breaks up my regular drawing process and allows me to "deadline" (as a verb) very efficiently. The first rule was, "All panels must be square, or can be broken into squares". -The logic being that I can stack squares into a variety of page formats when printing.

    My regular comics process is less linear.
     
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  5. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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    <<...I've never thought about doing layout purely based on text positioning...>>

    ...That approach surprised me, as well, but I thought that it might be more along the lines of story boarding; that is, this dialog (and action) has to happen here, that there, so I can wrap up this episode in N squares. I assumed that you probably repositioned and refined dialogue as each square was developed.

    I think that's what you are describing as "deadlining?"
     
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  6. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    That sums it up nicely.

    Though, as I script, I also do a kind of virtual penciling in my head, so even though the squares are blank except for the word balloons, I know already more or less what I'm positioning the balloons to achieve. Plus I get to refine the dialogue after everything is drawn.

    It's one of the advantages to working on my own.

    Fun Fact: In the old Marvel comics of the 70's and 80's, the process worked differently from how people might suspect: The penciler would receive a general story description with major action breakdowns and notes, but limited dialogue. The writer would then look at the pencils and the available spaces for word balloons and then fill them accordingly.

    One artist explained it to me like this:

    For a picture of a character running from a falling piano, if there wasn't a lot of space, the word balloon might read, "Oh no! A falling piano!"

    If there was a lot of space, the balloon might instead read, "Oh no! A falling piano being accelerated toward me at a great speed due to the force of gravity!"

    It sounds like a silly process, but I think it might have been one of the Big Discoveries in the evolution of comics. -It allowed the writer to react according to the actual world provided by the artwork, and thus keep the dialogue in coherence with the visuals. -This is one of the areas where modern comic books often fall down. It may in fact be one reason Marvel made such compelling comics back in The Day.
     
  7. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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    <<...I also do a kind of virtual penciling in my head...>>

    ...Speaking about thinking ahead, years ago I read an interesting recollection about 50's pop music composition. The author was a fairly prolific composer / writer (his claim) from that period. Talking about the process of song creation, he mentioned that it was common to compose a catchy melody first, and then spread nonsense syllables throughout the melody which helped to "scale" how and where the intended lyrics would best fit. Then, using the nonsense syllables as a guide, he would work on inserting the actual lyrics. Of course, the actual process was likely more sophisticated than this, but he was speaking in generalities. I've always thought that the "do-wap" lyrics (e.g., The Witch Doctor, 1958, David Seville) in many 50's and 60's songs were a vestige of the original nonsense lyrics that sounded good on their own and fit and were therefore never converted into actual words...
     
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  8. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I was listening to one of those, "History of Rock & Roll" radio shows, and I can't remember the song, but one of those super-recognizable fairly recent songs we've all heard didn't even make it out of the nonsense lyrics part. The words, literally, mean nothing, but that didn't stop it from making bank. :)
     
  9. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Hee hee!

    My replacement Dell Canvas Pen just arrived.

    The original one had a manufacturing flaw; it had a 'sketchy' IAF, dropping light lines when I held it at a certain angle, (the angle where the button was placed for optimal use).

    But the replacement seems to be perfect! What a relief! What a great pen!

    Now... I must resist the temptation to sneakily re-package the faulty one and return it. -I basically spent $100 to avoid wasting a day with the tech support team. I may still do that out of principle, but how I dearly want to close that book and walk away...
     
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