Dell Latitude XT Tablet PC Release and Our First Thoughts

Discussion in 'News Headlines' started by jared2, Dec 18, 2007.

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  1. quantum

    quantum Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I say we boycott it till they drop the price... and lets tell all our bosses too, because the corporate world really doesn't care that it's the price of a decent used student car (think Tercel and the likes). Maybe then we'll get a chance at this.

    I was checking the specs for the digitizer, and it seems the unique part of the N-Trig implementation is that the 1000dpi resolution and 225 level sensitivity applies not only to active, but also passive input which means the screen is very sensitive to finger movements. This opens up the possibility of swift finger movement shortcuts, like flicks. Imagine flicking left twice for 'back', twice right for 'forward', pinching and two finger scrolling a la iPhone for zooming etc... now that would be interesting.

    I just had an evil thought: with a price drop, the XT with the outdoor screen would make a fantastic carputer. Imagine integrating the dock connection in the dashboard, so you either seat it into the dash, or have a hideaway slab in to which you insert the body/keyboard portion of the machine like a diskette and swivel the screen out in a upright position. Can anyone say biggest GPS screen ever? Not to mention in-car entertainment/internet galore and possibly night vision/IR camera integration. The CPU could even be used for car statistics (such as the recording G-forces, lap times, throttle and braking responses etc.) and on-site repairs/modifications (ignition timing, air/fuel mixtures, cam angles and timing, boost control and timing for turbo engines, injection pressure and timing control, valve timing, throttle response and gearchange control for auto/sequential boxes)...
     
  2. Mydixiwrecked00

    Mydixiwrecked00 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    well.... the xt would be great for the in-car BUT no optical, #$%^ dell! plenty of companies already make car-puters. i had one in the late 90s when the idea was still new and deemed to "take the market by storm" yeah, still waiting on that one. ive been considering going back to one vs. the all in one radio/ navigation flip out units that i have had in the past. computers are really nice when it comes down to something fully customizeable but the off the shelf flipouts/ static screens have seemless intergration which tilts the tables their way for user friendly. and the rumormill in the car stereo world is pioneer is comming out with an all in one unit this comming year thats windows based with internet capabilities making it the first on the market. they already have vehicle dynamics available along with bluetooth connectivity, gps (pioneer uses telenav) sat radio/ traffic, tv tuners, voice control.. and the list goes on. engine diagnostics would be a nice added touch. for the average joe.... the stuff on the street is more then complicated enough but for the computer savy, theres no substitute for the power of a real computer. todays in cars are under a grand if u shop around, making them cheaper then the all in one radios in many cases. companies are finally comming out with skins and GUI's for the carputers to make them as easy to use as the all in one units making them alot more attractive to the technically challenged. theres nothing better then having a huge touch screen at arms reach just in case that morning traffic turns into an arcade parlor..... or even buisness meeting if u really like work that much. and lets not forget the abilities of automation, sercutiry integration, or even a rolling wifi hotspot:)

    yeah, i know this doesnt say much about the xt.... but then again, i dont have much to say about it now that i have waited this long for its debut only to feel kicked in the nuggets once i saw the price tag and no optical.
     
  3. PLATINUM

    PLATINUM Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Couldn't agree more! I have built no less than 300 pcs for friends, family, and self since the 90s. You can buy various touch screens on the market today and integrate them to a pc relatively easy for a road warrior type.

    Easily I could put together a dual core AMD 3ghz (oc'd to 3.2ghz) 1000FSB. and dual SLI video.. for right around $1500 if you went cutting (not bleeding) edge tech.

    I really wish that laptops went the OEM route in as much that you could literally buy what you wanted to integrate with them.. because the reality is Toshiba, Gateway, and Dell don't manufacture a dang thing except maybe for boxing it with the components you order and running a diag before it ships.

    So maybe someday.. rather than being limited to what they shove down our throats. We could select from the various REAL manufacturers of components.

    Call me a dreamer..
     
  4. quantum

    quantum Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Well, my thought of integrating the XT with the docking port was so that it could utilize an in-dash optical drive, but I guess it's a bit too much even for a glorified carputer.

    I agree with PLATINIM in that system manufacturers are actually just engineering available parts into a mass-manufacturable chassis/body. Due to the mass nature of this, less customization is available. I remember back in college one of my dorm buddies had bought a fully customized portable from somewhere. I was amazed, as basically they put a whole bunch of options available on their site, and even the chassis/body combination could be customized to your liking. They had various motherboard with various chipsets, a slew of graphics options and an actually appealing range of bodies for them all. All the way up to the top end, they costed less than similar offerings from name brands. At the top end you could even have a Geforce 2 GTS in it, which is what I had in my desktop system at the time... If I ever come across that site again, I'll definitely take a look at them again.

    I think considering the business nature of the Latitude line, companies will actually buy the XT for field/outdoor working employees and such, and probably won't mind getting a couple for their graphics divisions, just to keep them working while they're out of the office...
     
  5. PLATINUM

    PLATINUM Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Quantum,

    I would suggest you look at the current in dash DVD touch screens. They are not writers, but they certianly are players. You could easily integrate a PC to one and the PC could have the optical writer available in your trunk. You could even put a wireless N router on it and link it to whatever portable option you have.

    In effect you would benefit from being able to extend your range of wireless mobility. i.e. if your vehical was in range of a network that your portable was out of.

    One obstacle is battery life. Not a huge problem.. more of an annoyance than anything.
     
  6. Shogmaster

    Shogmaster Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    I don't know what I was to be so impressed with that video. He was using standard flick built into the OS, the flicking wasn't much more smooth and responsive than a soft resistive digitizer, he was using IE7's built in scroll anywhere feature, and Journal stuff (that he was calling OneNote, har har) wasn't all that accurate with his finger (over highlighting etc).

    I guess if you want to do fat finger painting with it, it's great that you won't get vectoring while doing no effort inking, but that's what the damn pen's for. And their pen is only 256 levels of pressure, just like Wacom's UD digitizer inside TPCs.

    I really don't get the big deal. The Gateway C-120 I checked out @ a local Best Buy had a resistive touch digitizer that was very light touch too and the screen remained very clear even though it was resistive. And the fact that it came with Wacom built in as well meant when I wanted to get serious with inking, you have a much better option than using your finger. So what's the big deal about N-Trig other than having multi-touch capacity that you can't use for years?
     
  7. jared2

    jared2 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Suposedly, N-Trig is supposed to be the best technology out there. The presentation does look a bit lame, but I think they were trying to show that it basically turns your screen into a iphone screen allowing softer/more accurate touches.

    My concern is that I really like the Toshiba better, but they said they took a Wacom Digital screen and overlayed another company's passive touch screen on it. I'm thinking that it won't be as sensative as the Dell one, but we won't know until side by side reviews are done. I had the HP tablet for a week, and you really had to press hard to get it to recognize anything. Lets see!
     
  8. Shogmaster

    Shogmaster Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Supposedly, that "info" come from N-Trig tooting their own horns. Yeah, it's the best capacitive touch out there for that form factor, but since we need so little from that kind of digitizer for Windows at this point, it's all moot to me.

    iPhone screen works for iPhones since they are tiny. On Windows laptops, the benefits of capacitive turns into zippo since Windows can't take advantage of multi touch for a while, and that you need something far more precise than your fat fingers. When you're feeling lazy, sure, it's great to just do some simple navigating with your fingers, but as you can tell in that video, he was struggling to do more complex tasks. In those situations, it's time to put the kids to bed and whip out that active digitizer pen. And when that happens, Wacom wins with similar specs and much better software support.

    More sensitive don't mean much when you have to use your fat fingers! With resistive + Wacom combo, I can use my fingertips or nails to do simple stuff too. Need palm rejection? Use your damn pen stoopid! ;)
     
  9. jared2

    jared2 Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Wow...someone's got a pole up their BUTT! ;-)

    When I buy a new device, I'd like it to last me more than a 6 months to a year. Since multi-touch will becoming more popular, software will be developed for it...although I have no idea what it will be.

    All I know is that I liked using my fingers on the screen, but the HPs "sensativity" was terrible. I would rather not have to use my nail...in that scenario, I would rather use the pen.

    All in all, from the video, this screen seemed to be the most sensative of the ones I've seen.
     
  10. quantum

    quantum Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    The advantage of the capacitive screen of the Dell is that it's a single layer, as opposed to the Lenovo, Toshiba and Gateway solutions. This means there's probably less 'grain' as there are less layers in front of the LCD itself. I like that screens will look better, but without software support, a better looking screen on new hardware negates the functionality of a tablet...

    I'm waiting on the Toshiba too, as the LED backlighting on the screen may just be powerful enough to overcome the dim look of the Lenovo and the grain of the dual layers.
     
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