Dell Canvas 27

Discussion in 'Artists' started by doobiedoobiedum, Jan 14, 2018.

  1. Azzart

    Azzart Late night illustrator Senior Member

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    I would be more worried by the distance between you and the cintiq with a keyboard in between.
    That monster of a tablet should be at the edge of the desk and even this way it's, from personal experience, uncomfortable to draw on when it lies on its feet.
    The colour shift from the wrong viewing angle and reflection glare as distant as those are would be a mess.
     
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  2. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Yeah... Good point.

    What are they teaching at that school, I wonder? How to injure your neck and spine before age 30?
     
  3. Marty

    Marty Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    That's what I'm saying, everyone is going to move the keyboard to the side, to draw up close to the Cintiq—except there is no space on the side. :confused:
     
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  4. doobiedoobiedum

    doobiedoobiedum Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Hehehe, let me elaborate - and it also touches on a previous thread of mine where I stated that our IT dept gave those who asked for Macs the very latest and those who asked for PCs (me and two others) either got bricks or 5 year old hand-me-downs. I even posted on that thread the 'latest' Windows tablet our students have for their work here.

    Well, backstory for the college I visited - the room was pre allocated and 16x 13" Wacom Cintiq Companions were asked for for that room.
    Instead, an Arts IT dept gave the team 27" Wacom Cintiqs and some powerful desktop PCs under the table - so now, whether the viewing angles are bad or it's a bit cramped there - compare that room with what I got for my digital art studio -
    • 15 Hand-me-down desktops from the business course where the most demanding application was MS Office. 4GB Ram, no graphic card etc etc
    • 15 Standard Dell monitors
    • 3 Wacom Intuos and that was actually something I already had from a previous fight with IT.
    No way on this planet am I posting a pic of my "Digital studio!" Too embarrassing.

    See why I'm envious? At least with the room I saw, you have an amazing starting point - you could argue for a better room at another point and get monitor stands. In education, always better to start with the equipment you want - the space and rooming can always be sorted afterwards.
     
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  5. Marty

    Marty Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Didn't you also say that you were still in discussions with the IT team? Possibly considering upgrading to drawing monitors? Did that deal fall through?

    And mean what gives with ghetto art budget for your course? :mad: Can't you complain to the dean or something?

    Please do! :)

    Don't feel embarrassed; there's nothing to be ashamed of. In fact, I think you deserve props as an art teacher for working through those challenges.

    Also, on a personal level, I'm super curious as I've always wanted to enroll in an art course. I'd like to see what classroom layout is like in a "regular" non-rich school, so I can adjust my expectations accordingly.
     
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  6. doobiedoobiedum

    doobiedoobiedum Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Those discussions are ongoing - hence my trip to visit other colleges where the budget and spend has already been allocated. Dell 27's are the offer (pushed quite hard and favourably by Dell sales) but I don't think I'd get the budget I would want. No way on this planet I'd get more than 2-3 drawing monitors. Just a question of who makes the better deal for me. Wacom so far won't stump up a trial machine but Dell are going to. I like "try before you buy."

    I'll elaborate in answer to your next question below.

    Sometimes I think if a student chooses very carefully, there is no need to enrol on a long art course. If you know where you want to go or be or develop then look for specific classes that support that. If you enrol on some long courses, they are designed to get you to do things you might not want to or had tried before - this all depends on the student. In the 1970's I used to follow the work of an autistic kid who could draw any scene he'd seen almost perfectly. His stuff was amazing and then because of his age, he had to do a college art course - they changed his stuff / style and he dropped out of the public eye for 10-15 years.
    He's back now and doing stuff like he used to before that course.

    15 years to work out and get over the effect of that course

    http://www.stephenwiltshire.co.uk

    Personally I think specialist classes where people pay or want to be there are better than the other type of course. If you want to focus on anatomy / drawing skills / painting classes then go to them and squeeze every ounce of value from that class.

    Donglu Yu is a great example.

    https://www.artstation.com/donglu

    Her parents paid for her to do non-school watercolour classes around 14 years of age and even though she would have gone to art school after general education, she had a solid foundation of painting skills that you still see in her digital work.

    The age range I work with, I'd say a third to half really want to be there. Some of those with real ability have zero interest in the creative industry or just think amazing jobs are just waiting for them after college. For some - there are companies knocking on my door to take students on and train them up in crafts skills but many prefer to work at McDonalds and hope to go to University and think amazing jobs are waiting for them.

    Most have been switched off study by school and don't like to put in the hours of practice needed. I think the last point is the nail on the head - 3/4 of my job is trying to explain to students that they need to practice and hone skills like a musician hones their skills or a sportsperson puts hours in on cold wet fields to better themselves.

    Got that off my chest! You can see why I'm itching to pay off my mortgage and go run my own studio! Sorry for the long post.
     
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  7. doobiedoobiedum

    doobiedoobiedum Scribbler - Standard Member

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    OK, the test machine arrived and I couldn't wait. I know the setup lacks an adjustable arm for drawing at different angles but I only have one month with this thing and I have to try and convince other tutors and a variety of students that we should get a studio full.

    My back will hurt, the angles are off for colour but I don't care, I had 27 inches of screen real estate to work with.
    WP_20180201_17_16_03_Pro.jpg WP_20180201_17_16_25_Pro.jpg

    First impressions, I love the size. I don't love the accuracy at the edges. I've been out of forum circulation a couple of years and new EMR accuracy really doesn't seem that much better than old EMR accuracy. The compensating factor is that with a 27 inch screen, you can have your image fill quite a bit of space and not be near the edge where you'd pick up cursor drift.

    I also found that I haven't really been drawing these last few years with my 12" tabletpc - I did a couple of rough sketches and then suddenly found myself doing a drawing at A2 kind of size and liking the drawing. On my way home, I thought back on a range of sketches I've done on my HP 2760 and other tablets and realised why I have preferred to spend more time modelling clay figures than drawing / digital art. At the price we're being offered, I might pick one up for myself!
     
  8. Marty

    Marty Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    So exactly how does the process of "convincing" work?

    Do you have to prepare a presentation for the faculty? Will you select students for a test session? Do you need a certain number "signatures" and/or what criteria do they evaluate the decision for the final purchase?

    I'm just super curious as to how all this works in academia, and of course, I'm rootin' for you all the way. :)
     
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  9. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Ahh..! That looks like fun!

    Back in grade school here in Canada, you would have been called by other kids appreciative of your good fortune a, "Lucky Duck".

    Enjoy!
     
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  10. doobiedoobiedum

    doobiedoobiedum Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Worst thing is most art departments are their own worst enemy, we teach students to be creative with minimal resources and raise where we can and if we do any work with a client we try and do it as cheaply as possible. Meanwhile a media department can happily quote for the latest 8K cameras and editing equipment or expensive studio facilities without batting an eyelid.

    Anyhow, the new IT people I've worked with for the last year are pretty good, very on our side and have tried to treat us equally. The guy who happily gave me a 5-10 year old brick Windows laptop while everyone else got brand new MacBooks moved onto another dept (I still wind him up about that) and it has been better. Convincing - iMacs are still very popular but without giving too much away, convincing means showing that we can have drawing screens and powerful PC desktops across several courses as a cross faculty resource as opposed to a slightly more expensive iMac studio. Don't get me wrong, I like iMacs but in this instance cost is on my side.

    As for students, showing that a wide variety of students will benefit from access to such machines - problem is though, a room full of all in ones with keyboards will work for Arts / games / design / Media / Business / Math / etc students whereas a room of drawing or art focused machines is likely to only suit games / arts / design students.

    In the best possible world, success breeds success. If a resource is in demand then the college / university hierarchy orders more of that resource and less of a less popular resource. I'm very wary of that one after being burnt twice in the distant past at a different employer - I was told, work hard, increase the numbers of students and you'll get more staff on your team, more resources for your department. You can guess how that played out. To be honest, it usually depends on the people who hold the strings, if they are sympathetic then things work smoothly but if you're not flavour of the month it gets really hard.

    Anyhow, I need to prove the facility would be used - no college wants to sink large amounts of money into something that isn't used much. Luckily, Dell seem willing to help (for whatever reason) and if I can get some non Art courses involved then things can work out.

    I've spent the evening looking at the cost of a drawing monitor + proper Windows 10 desktop (not the type business students will happily accept) vs a low end 27" iMac and it's looking good...
     
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