Deciding between these for Art/Drawing. Which one?

Discussion in 'Motion Computing' started by Nils-san, Nov 29, 2016.

  1. Nils-san

    Nils-san Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Hello again. I've been looking for some "cintiq alternatives" and i just found out about these little tablets.

    I've done some research, but i still can't decide between these five along with their prices:

    J3400 with 2gb ram: 230-250 euros aprox.

    LE1600 with 1gb ram: 170-180 euros aprox.

    LE1700 with 2gb ram: 170-180 euros aprox.

    M1400
    with 1gb ram: 140-155 aprox.

    M1300 with 1gb ram: 125 aprox.

    I'm going to use it exclusively for art (SAI is the only one i've been using, which is very light)

    I don't mind low pen pressure that much, but i really care if it gets too hot to the point it bothers/hurts your hands while drawing (happened with the X60 tablet)

    So, which one should i get?

    Thank you!
     
  2. Olivier A.

    Olivier A. Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Hi, did you consider the Fujitsu ST5112 ? I got one before my Cintiq Companion 2 and I have to say it was a really great tablet for sketching. You can change the HDD for a SSD, and you have "physical" keys on the side (I used it as express keys).
    I made a little video here about the tablet (in french, sorry):

    Here is the test I made on my blog.
    Hope it will help you.
     
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  3. Nils-san

    Nils-san Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Oh yes! i had this one in mind. I was looking for it but sadly, it's not being sold here in europe (amazon, ebay or other sites)
     
  4. WillAdams

    WillAdams Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Yeah, I really regret not picking up a Fujitsu Stylistic ST5121 --- not quite as nice looking as the ST4xxx series, but the larger screen size and faster processor make up for it, and I probably could've installed Windows 7 and still be using it.
     
  5. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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    <<...I probably could've installed Windows 7 and still be using it...>>

    ...As someone who has Windows 7 running on an HP / Compaq TC1100, you're absolutely right!

    <<...which one should i get?..>>

    Nils: Of the five devices that you list, I'm going to suggest that you get the LE1700.

    The LE1300 / 1400 are now quite long in the tooth and aren't likely to be very satisfying now.

    The J3400 is slightly dated; I've never liked the shape of the case for long-term holding, but it does have some nice features.

    I think the LE1700 (which has twice the RAM of the LE1600 for the same price) probably represents the best value for a casual, back-up tablet and it has a user-friendly case shape...
     
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  6. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Sorry, I removed it because I realized upon re-reading your post that you'd already owned a TPC and knew about them, and that you were asking specifically about the Motion Computing line which I actually know nothing about.

    But since you're interested...

    The Portege M200 had the best screen resolution available in the day, (a very few other models also shared this distinction, but it came standard and affordable on the M200).

    There was definitely some heat from the unit, -all of those old machines used inefficient and energy hungry processors, but I never found it uncomfortable or distracting. It was about the same as any decent laptop circa 2004. The fan noise was also quite good compared to similar machines. It wasn't one of the louder ones. But it IS old tech, so you will definitely notice a difference between it and a modern super-slim all-day battery machine.

    For the price, though, it's hard to complain.
     
  7. Marty

    Marty Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Great video Olivier! :thumbsup:

    Every time I look back on the old Stylistics, my first thought is how come this looks more usable than modern tablets?! :vbtongue:

    Sometimes I wish we could return to the days of 4:3 outdoor-viewable matte displays!...with buckets of ports, replaceable batteries and EMR...ahh sigh, talk about the good ol' days.

    I wish you all the best and happy drawing with your device!
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2016
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  8. Nils-san

    Nils-san Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Thank you for this info. I saw the M200 for 110 euro, but for 50 bucks more i got the M780. Can't really decide. Should i go for the M780?
     
  9. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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    <<...ahh sigh, talk about the good ol' days...>>

    Uh-huh... really good. Tablets weighted 3-1/2 pounds. Batteries lasted for ~2-1/2 hours. Screens were probably set to 150 nits; they could hit about 200 nits, but then battery life was about 1-1/2 hours! You think that fans are noisy now?

    But; I admit that we had Wacom EMR and (that golden aspiration) pen silos... that would occasionally jam so the pen wouldn't come out, or break so the pen wouldn't stay in.

    Suit yourself, but I'm not going back!!!
     
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  10. Marty

    Marty Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I think you're selling the old Fujitsu's a bit short there... ;)

    While it's true that the old screens couldn't hit a high peak brightness, they employed transreflective displays that were far, far more viewable outdoors:

    [​IMG]

    Stylistics like the ST5112 employed Fujitsu's indoor/outdoor display (ST4121 on left) compared to typical screens (ST4110 on right). It was a gigantic leap. Everytime, I wish I could take my Z Canvas out to sketch in the sun like the old days!

    Also check out the shots of the ports, from Lisa's glowing review:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    "two USB 2.0, one unpowered 4 pin FireWire, 3.5mm stereo out, mono mic in, Ethernet and modem ports. Two consumer (fast) IR windows flank the display, one on each side and the integrated mic and speaker are on the left side of the display bezel. The PCMCIA, Smart Card and SD/Memory Stick slots are on the top edge and the removable battery release is on the back near the bottom. The docking station connector is on the back and most of the computer's back surface is covered with a soft, black suede-like material that feels good and improves grip"

    Now tell me a tablet today that even comes close!

    And then check out the 6 bezel buttons, 2 rocker switches, and fingerprint scanner:

    [​IMG]

    It terms of form factor, in many ways it even exceeds the best features of the ZC and CC/MSP combined! All while maintaining a slim form factor and user-upgradeability (with oh-so-handy battery swapability).

    There's a lot to be nostalgic about here!
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2016
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