Creating art on tablets remains a work in progress article

Discussion in 'Artists' started by doobiedoobiedum, Oct 23, 2012.

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  1. doobiedoobiedum

    doobiedoobiedum Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I know some of us here believe iPads and finger touch devices are incapable of producing art but if you can ignore the first part of the article which is about artists and photographers doing just that (producing artwork using fingers) - the article does also touch on Wacom and stylus devices too - I think this is an interesting article which shows that there may still be a long way to go in developing true art devices that content producers can really push and develop.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 18, 2015
  2. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    "Interesting"?

    In other words:

    "See, the iPad CAN TOO be used for content creation! Just look at that picture! And anyway stylus tablets aren't good enough for making content because this article says so."

    Without commenting on the cognitive dissonance necessary to digest that logical hair ball, I'd have to say that this sounds suspiciously like sour grapes and more Cult of Apple brain fog.
     
  3. doobiedoobiedum

    doobiedoobiedum Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Sorry, that wasn't the intention of the thread and the article doesn't make the inference you have made regarding wacom tablets. I seriously doubt you even read beyond the first paragraph and picture of a piece of art created on an iPad.

    We've had our differences of opinion in the past and I would prefer any discussion is held at a mature level. If you prefer to make this an Apple iPad thread, so be it, that's not my difference but I would ask your critique of anyone who disagree with you be at a more objective level.

    Anyhow, thank you for your response.
     
  4. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Whatever you say!

    (Except, of course, I did manage somehow to drag myself alllll the way past the fold. Words and I tend to get along rather well as it happens. I can even read the kind which don't confirm my personal biases. Wow!)
     
  5. leaftye

    leaftye Old timer Super Moderator

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    I hate how sketching on a tablet still must be done so differently than on a physical medium.

    For one, screen resolutions are still way too low, so any fine detail requires zooming in. Forget about using a fine tip and using a light touch because even if the program registers what you're doing, you won't be able to see it unless you zoom in a lot...and that's just not good when you're attempting to use longer strokes.

    I'd also really love pressure sensitive touch screens. I'd love to be able to smudge virtual graphite with a finger in the same way and with the same results as on paper.
     
  6. Pesho

    Pesho Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Meh, i think electromagnetic digitizers are the future of art. Real-media simulations such as "pressure sensitive touchscreen to smudge virtual graphite with a finger" are of value only for people who have grown up with traditional art means like paper and pen/charcoal/paint and have sentimental attachments to it. Zooming in is much better than a hi-res screen without zooming in, as it's equivalent to drawing using a needle and a microscope whenever you want. Also, you can't accurately simulate a no-contact tool like the airbrush using a touchscreen.
     
  7. Steve B

    Steve B Moderator Moderator

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    That's an interesting point. I would say that things like "pressure sensitivity to pretend to smudge something" would allow for a greater human engagement in the art-making process, which would seem to be the point, IMO-- the interaction between the artist and the art-making device.

    Interesting thought re: no contact tools. That had never occurred to me before.

    Finally, I think there are other specific issues with zooming in versus high res, but that's more a matter of opinion. Digital art often focuses on detail, and thus zooming in is very central to the tool. I think detail in re: to expression is rather over-rated at times. I wish that digital artists spent less time zooming in, and more time working at "print size", so to speak. That, of course, is its own issue if you're working for the screen versus print. Though, even for the screen there is an expect res for the viewer to interact with things.
     
  8. doobiedoobiedum

    doobiedoobiedum Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I got to try a prototype Stantum digitizer a couple of years ago, it allowed you to use whatever you wanted to for input and you weren't limited to a stylus or a finger. I thought the possibilities were huge because you could zoom and draw with a digitiser (didn't have to be a Wacom pen or anything like that) and then smudge with a finger afterwards - or 10 if you so wished as it allowed 10 different touch / pressure points at the same time.

    The problem was the prototype ran on a 10 inch Dell so the problem of broad strokes came to the fore however I could pick and choose the tool I drew with - much like I can when I work with ink or paint on a canvass or Bristol Board.

    I think the real danger is thinking that "art" can only be done in one way and that nothing else is valid - Titian began by using traditional painting techniques when he explored oils but he also painted with fingers, elbows and bits of rag. I think a lot of digital artists would learn a lot by taking a more experimental approach to the way they create art.

    Anything you draw or create art with is the tool and a means to an end - not the outcome itself.
     
  9. Pesho

    Pesho Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Yeah, it would certainly add a new level of interaction and i'm all for any of the latest man-machine interface gadgetry. What i meant was that one shouldn't be "hoping" for tablet interaction to simulate traditional media at 100%, since every technology brings with it a new means for creating art. doobiedoobiedum hit the nail on the head with their post. You could, for example, dream about haptic touchscreens and pens that would bring yet another level of possibilities.

    About hi-res screens - more pixels is always better, and we're pretty much already headed in that direction :) If you ask me, a full 1080p 12'' screen is enough to match the level of detail paper can provide.

    Anyway, what i tried to say was that those who prefer traditional media should probably stick to that. The best advantage it offers is that whatever artwork you make is there to hold in real life.
     
  10. kakeashi

    kakeashi Pen Pal - Newbie

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    will be trying out the new samsung ativ pro for art, 11inch screen, 1920x1080 resolution, spen stylus with 1024 levels of pressure sensitivity

    and the art docks for the samsung slates are amazing, its like having those side buttons the cintiqs have but on the screen, and only touch is enabled on those side bars and touch is disabled everywhere else
     
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