Connected Standby battery drain issue

Discussion in 'Dell' started by next_milenium, Jan 7, 2014.

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  1. daver

    daver Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    That's excellent to hear. Meanwhile, I manually disabled Connected Standby via the registry and haven't had any real problems with battery drain while Sleeping. I would say that a 6 hour Sleep session drains maybe 10% from keyboard battery during the few times I've tested long-term sleeping. I would imagine that the tablet battery would see than 10% drain in 6 hours (given that keyboard battery is about 50% capacity).

    A few times the tablet cut power to the SSD due to timeout and caused the machine to reboot, but I fixed that by setting the silly AHCI Power Management option to Adaptive HIPM/DIPM (default 100ms) and haven't had a single incident since.

    As well, I've found absolutely no major advantage to Connected Standby vs normal Standby. The only difference between the two is that I have to wait about 5 seconds after opening an Metro app or desktop application for it to update itself, whereas Connected Standby updates those open applications in the background while Sleeping. I would much prefer to have that extra 20-30% battery life saved and wait those 5 seconds than have no battery life left.
     
  2. kabutar

    kabutar Pen Pal - Newbie

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  3. Mikerman

    Mikerman Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Doesn't it feel as if Connected Standby was one of those things that sounded wow-like on paper and originally, until you actually thought about it, and then later, until you saw the hit that it caused?
     
  4. daver

    daver Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I wasn't wowed with it on paper or in practice. I thought it was a bad idea from the get-go. On a really low-level concept it's a pretty nifty feature to have, but in practice it's silly because of the hardware we have. Why would I want my device to be always on? If I'm going to power something down, I want it powered down. If S3 "Sleep" is like Napping (stored in RAM, but nothing actually running), then S4 "Connected Standby" is like Nodding Off where you keep snapping your head back up every time it dips. In the end, you're not really resting and you've actually spent unnecessary energy because you never actually rested/slept.
     
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  5. rwerksman

    rwerksman Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Can you walk us through how you disabled CS? I saw a registry entry basically making CSstandby = 0, but that supposedly nukes all of sleep.

    How did you adjust the ACHI settings?


    EDIT:

    Just looked in the bios and noticed there was a S3 disable option there. Is that what you were talking about?
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2014
  6. rwerksman

    rwerksman Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Considering I have exactly 0 Cisco in my environment, that doesn't fill me with a whole lot of confidence.
     
  7. daver

    daver Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    NOTE: Do this at your own risk. Create a full Windows Restore point, do a RecImg, create an Acronis image backup, anything to ensure that you have a backed up copy of your Windows registry in case something goes wrong. Please only follow the below steps at your own discretion: I cannot be held responsible if your Windows installation goes boink, or somehow it explodes into tiny bits of hatred.

    This is what I did in a Windows 8.1 Professional environment - note that I don't know if this works with the OEM copy of Windows 8.1 Core provided by Dell.

    To disable Connected Standby and enable Hibernation:
    Go to HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Power
    1. set CsEnabled to 0
    2. set HibernateEnabled to 1 (optional if you wish to use Hibernation at all)
    3. Reboot

    In each of the following subdirectories, add a DWORD record called "Attributes" and give it value of 2 (HEX or Dec). So if there are 4 steps, there should be 4 "Attributes" values
    Go to HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Power\PowerSettings

    For setting AHCI Power Management
    1. In subdir Power\0012ee47-9041....
    1a. 0b2d69d7-a2a1...
    1b. dab60367-53fe...

    For setting Sleep settings
    2. In subdir Power\238C9FA8-0AAD...
    2a. 94AC6D29-73CE...
    2b. abfc2519-3608...

    For disabling USB Hub Selective Suspend
    3. In subdir Power\2a737441-1930...
    3a. 48e6b7a6-50f5...

    Then reboot.

    Open the Power Options menu and set the Advanced Power Settings
    (Active power plan name)
    >Hard Disk
    >> AHCI Link Power Management - HIPM/DIPM
    >>> Set both Battery and Plugged in to "HIPM+DIPM"

    >Sleep
    >> Set these sleep settings to whatever you want. Note that Hybrid sleep and Hibernate are now available

    >USB Settings
    >>USB Selective Suspend Settings
    >>>Set both Battery and Plugged in to "Disabled"


    To ensure that Connected Standby is disabled and normal Standby is in place, open an elevated Command Prompt
    1. Win + X, Shift + A
    2. type in "powercfg /a", hit Enter

    You should then see the list of available power states, followed by the list of unavailable power states. "Standby (S3)" should be in that list, which is the old fashioned Sleep option. Hibernate should also be in that list if you set it previously in the Registry. You should also see "Standby (Connected)" in the list of unavailable sleep states. To ensure that Sleep is an option in the Shut Down settings
    1. Go to the Power Options window (right click battery icon, Power Options)
    2. click on "Choose what the power button does"
    3. click on "Change settings that are unavailable"
    4. scroll down
    5. Under "Shutdown settings" you should have 4 options:
    Turn on fast startup (recommended)
    Sleep
    Hibernate
    Lock.

    Make sure Sleep is enabled. Hibernate is optional if you want to use it. I personally disabled Fast Startup, because I'm crotchety about it - it's just my preference, you should normally leave it on unless you have a specific need for it.

    Again, please only make these changes at your own risk. It's relatively safe to do all of these on your own, and extremely easy to reverse (just delete the Attributes key!). It's a good idea to reboot between each step just to ensure that the changes are being committed, though not necessary.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2014
  8. Mikerman

    Mikerman Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Pretty much what I had meant--fine if only a brief expenditure of battery energy; but not as in actual practice.
     
  9. deadkenny

    deadkenny Pen Pal - Newbie

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    The intent was to provide a standby platform similar to those on mobile phones like (I believe) Android. It makes sense for mobile devices you expect to be always on and updating but yet want to minimise battery drain if you aren't looking at the screen 100% of the time. On a tablet then maybe it's less desirable, or is it? Do Android tablets work the same as phones in this fashion.

    Have to say it's kind of nice. Though Win 8 appears to shut down apps after a while of no use and they seem to stop notifying, so I only hear pings from updates for 10 minutes or so after the tablet is in standby. Waking up hours later, and apps seem to be launching from scratch and loading their content.
     
  10. jyan_osu

    jyan_osu Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I have an Asus Transformer T700 tablet and it is the same as a phone where it does low battery state updates when the screen is off.

    I treat the Venue 11 Pro more like a computer than a tablet. I don't need it to be constantly updating and turn it off. It turns on really quick and everything gets pulled pretty quickly for me on my updates of like email and social networks.
     
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