Computex 2019

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Steve S, May 27, 2019.

  1. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Though... That "Honeycomb Glacier" tri-fold rig...

    [​IMG]

    This is definitely a good direction for laptops; not for the second display thing, (though, I guess, why not?) but for the "Sit up Straight!" factor.

    I built my own solution for this years ago now, and I think the entire world could benefit from not having to sit scrunched up. Imagine millions of users all being able to inhale and exhale properly? Not being constrained in body (and mind!) their entire work day? It could change the damned world!
     
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  2. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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    <<...I noticed at this show the theme seemed to be one of low-impact non-innovation...>>

    @thatcomicsguy : I agree that low-innovation seems to have set in over the last couple of years, but I'm not sure that I agree on the cause.

    A few months ago, someone (I can't remember who) made the astute observation that clock rates on Intel chips had barely moved at all for almost ten years and throughput rates had stagnated. From my perspective, I think that Intel deemed throughput rates to be adequate for "mainstream computing" and had decided to focus on power management, instead. So progress was still being made, but in a way that was not intrinsically exciting to power users like us...

    I think it all has to do with batteries. Consider that battery technology, the slow poke of the technical world, hasn't made any significant advances over the same time (and I would argue that's the primary reason why Intel decided that they had to shift focus), and I think the stage got set for several years of relatively unexciting products that featured only modest / incremental increases in computing and graphics power. This trend was aided and abetted by increasingly more compact form factors (e.g. Surface Pro and its competitors) that placed limits on just how much battery could be designed in.

    I recognize that, in many cases, device operating time has been significantly increased... but I argue that's not what excites us. Raw computing power, lightning fast graphics and dazzling, ultra-wide gamut displays (with enough nits to burn your eyes out)… That's what excites us!

    But at least for now, the power isn't there to allow these features in an "acceptable" form factor and weight.

    And that's why there isn't much for all of us to talk about. If my tablet happens to last an hour longer than your tablet... do most of us really care...???
     
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  3. dellaster

    dellaster Technomad Senior Member

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    Part of the perceived stagnation is due to Moore’s Law, the doubling of transistors in a dense integrated circuit every two years, coming to its end. ‘... and in 2015 Gordon Moore foresaw that the rate of progress would reach saturation: "I see Moore's law dying here in the next decade or so."‘
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moore's_law

    It’s only natural for those of us who got used to the high pace of progress during Moore’s Law’s reign to feel like something must be wrong, that human intent might be the cause. But it’s just the limits of physics. It had to slow eventually and here we are.
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2019
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  4. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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  5. nnthemperor

    nnthemperor Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Did you say artist? Dude, do you have a career in literature. Beautifully scripted post.

    Sent from my SM-N950F using Tapatalk
     
  6. Marty

    Marty Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Just want to chime in, I'm still nail-biting and looking to DIY my tech!

    With the ARM/cloud revolution on the horizon, learning to root/unlock your tablet and understanding the Chinese OEM parts market (with hackable firmware) is going to an essential skill in maintaining full control of your hardware!

    Also chiming in, I still see the innovation happening!

    Moore's Law applies in overlapping S-curves: once one tech reaches saturation, another takes over.

    [​IMG]

    In-terms of processor tech:
    1. The first S-curve was pure clock frequency, tapering around 2010 as you mentioned
    2. Then came the power efficiency S-curve, culminating in optimized, power-scaling chipsets (ULV/ARM/MAX-Q)
    3. Now the current S-curve is multi-core design: on the low-end with heterogenous ARM "efficiency" & "performance" cores; Intel/AMD doubling core numbers/PCIe lanes, while introducing multi-chiplet packages and chip-stacked dies; and lastly, Nvidia's push for ultra-dense GPUs (Volta)
    4. ...All of which is gearing up for the massive parallel compute performance required for neural network processing—ie. the quest for general AI—which is my bet for next S-curve.
    So the innovation is still occurring, quite rapidly (and scarily imo). ;):eek:
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2019
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