CNet on Tablet PCs: "This is not the future"

Discussion in 'The Tablet PC Life' started by MCSmarties, Oct 10, 2012.

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  1. ChrisRS

    ChrisRS Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I do not know of current or proposed tablet that is "Just as powerful". I would appreciate you pointing me in the right direction!

    My wish list:
    iCore processor - these ara available.
    active digitizer (prefer Wacom) few and far between
    8MB ram (6 minimum I use autocad)
    1080 screen
    Tablet or slate configuration. (Hinges/keyboards are dead weight and just something more to go wrong.)
    12" minimum - 14" prefered.
    Large hard drive - probaly hybrid HD/SSD (large Cad files need to be locally available even if in the cloud.)

    Skip the DVD/attery bay and go with optional slice battery.

    Be most price competative and increase market penetration.

    This is more of a slab, than a slate or tablet. I'll trade battery weight for mobility.

    I have used various TabletPCs as a desktop replcement for 10 years. I guess I am a niche user. I want a "portable power house", not a "mobile meh"
     
  2. jhoff80

    jhoff80 Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Other than the 8GB RAM (and the fact we don't know when it'll be released), this will have everything you want:

    Asus Transformer Book: More than meets the eye | ZDNet

    The 'slice' battery is in the form of a keyboard dock.

    Anyway, my point is more that there is nothing inherent to the traditional 'convertible' form factor in order to get a more powerful machine. There's nothing that you state that can be done better simply on the basis of having a swivel screen (or even the Lenovo Yoga's fold-over design). On top of that, as mentioned in the original article, consumers have already demonstrated for years that they don't want that form factor.

    I just don't see that changing. Manufacturers don't seem to see it changing either, since almost all of them are sticking to a regular laptop form factor or the hybrid slate form factor.

    Edit: Actually now that I think about it, I can't remember if the Transformer Book has Wacom. My point still stands though, because it's not about the actual device even, just that there is nothing inherently better about the convertible swivel design.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2012
  3. MCSmarties

    MCSmarties Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Wow I had no idea they were considering a 13" or even 14" version for the Asus Transformer Book!
    That makes it very interesting indeed...

    I found a short hands-on review of the 13" device here, but there's not much meat in it.

    Three things I wonder about:
    - Battery life in an ultrabook form factor?
    - No Wacom pen, really? (how much size/weight would an active digitizer layer really add to an already multitouch-capable screen?)
    - Ivy Bridge i7 running Windows 8, discrete GPU (!)... but no more than 4GB RAM? Why?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 18, 2015
  4. stoneseeker

    stoneseeker Animator and Art Director Senior Member

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    and the i5/i7 offered is half the power of the full voltage mobile series. less ram, less cpu power, ... but discrete graphics? really? that would be nice to see.

    Still, a non contender for those of us that require the wacom. I may as well go get a laptop then! wacom is the reason I am into the tabletPC form factor, but people like the cnet author don't seem to realize Wacom digitizer is a big deal.
     
  5. MCSmarties

    MCSmarties Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Does that make it an overpowered toy or an underpowered workhorse? That's the real question, isn't it? :eek:
     
  6. bloodycape

    bloodycape confused Senior Member

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    Most models of Vaio TT 11in notebooks were able to support up to 8gb of ram, and that was an ULV C2D device. If that, can I don't see how these newer models can't.
     
  7. Pesho

    Pesho Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I agree with the article in regards to the form factor. The traditional laptop-style convertible tablet is likely to disappear in favor of slate devices like the Asus Ep121 and the TC1100. Everything is in one unit, while the keyboard can be attached separately, or could even connect through a wireless interface such as bluetooth.

    What i don't like is that the article mistakenly alludes to those cheap toy tablets with a touchscreen and weak ARM processor such as the iPad as being the future. I envision the tablet of the future having the internals of a normal laptop with either just a touchscreen on cheaper models, or a touchscreen+EMR digitizer combination. It doesn't matter whether that digitizer is Wacom, Ntrig, Hanvon or whatever.
     
  8. Steve B

    Steve B Moderator Moderator

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    What we're really waiting for is tech to catch up with form. Right now, if you do any "real" heavy-duty mobile computing at all, a laptop still provides significantly greater power. What we need are chips to get small and cool enough that you can shove a very powerful cpu into a cool, fanless, light weight slate that gets good "all day" battery life. As it is, we're approaching that, but I still don't think it's really there yet. It's much more expensive than most people want to pay for their computer, IMO.

    Alternately, if the success of the iPad has show anything (beyond the value of great marketing), it's that the general masses don't really need or want real power in their mobile computing devices. They don't really care much if it runs Word, they just want a word processor. They want to go on the net, read articles, read books, type, play, etc. on their computer. This is what MOST people do MOST of the time. For that, in truth, an "underpowered" slate or detachable is probably just fine.

    We may have just finally reached a point where the power of laptops was way more than what a person usually needs, unless they're at work. We'll see if these new Atoms catch on, but if they do, I think it'll just push that proof further-- perhaps most people don't need iCores, and really will be fine with an Atom.
     
  9. ChrisRS

    ChrisRS Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I agree that the convertable form factor is not needed. I would prefer a large slate only.

    If the Asus Tranformer has a good active digitizer (Wacom) OK - If not - Forget it.
     
  10. Tams

    Tams Scribbler - Standard Member

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    The problem with people like that silly writer is that are comparing to TabletPCs to the recent tablets. While some of the TabletPCs (the UMPC like ones) were directed to what are now 'media consumption' tablets running on low power SOCs; most TabletPCs were aimed at being laptops.

    People like that writer just don't seem to be able to see TabletPCs as a subset of laptops. Then again, they'd probably go off on a rant about how it's not as light as their ultra-Face-book machine.

    That article doesn't even mention an AD. Nor does it mention if the CPU is LV or full voltage, nor how upgradeable it will be. It also has a 16:9 display, but I guess we'll just have to put up with that nowadays.

    As for convertibles not being better; if you can stand the extra weight, it means you get to use of whole system in tablet mode. There are of course drawbacks; weight, size and 'dividability' (you can't just take the tablet half), but you get the whole system. The only systems that allow for this are traditional swivels, Dell Duo like swivels and sliders (though sliders are arguable not really better at anything).
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2012
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