CNet on Tablet PCs: "This is not the future"

Discussion in 'The Tablet PC Life' started by MCSmarties, Oct 10, 2012.

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  1. MCSmarties

    MCSmarties Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I just came across this opinion post on CNet.

    The author obviously has a problem with convertible tablet PCs!
    He makes the Fujitsu Lifebook T902 his whipping boy to tear into tablet PCs in general.

    Now granted, this is CNet where everything not made in Cupertino gets docked one star automatically :rolleyes:, but still...

    Thoughts? Comments?

    PS: I apologize if this was already commented on here (the post dates back to July) but a search on this forum came up empty.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 18, 2015
  2. jhoff80

    jhoff80 Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    He's not saying that tablets aren't the future, he's saying that the bulky 4.4 pound convertible tablet isn't the future.

    Personally, I fully agree with him.
     
  3. stoneseeker

    stoneseeker Animator and Art Director Senior Member

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    Future of what?

    A future in mass consumer appeal? It never has been, and it never is going to be. It's not trying to be a toy like the ipad and android devices.

    Future for professional artists, and other niche markets? yep. It is the future, so long as function is valued over style and lightness.


    It's all relative anyway. The T902 may be heavy in contrast to a S7S or iPad, but my T902 is half the size and weight of my 17" monster toshiba Sattelite laptop it replaced. And a fraction of the weight of the desktop I had, and it runs circles around both in terms of power, usability, portability, battery life, etc.

    I'll buy a "light" device when it can run all my animation software, do video editing, and then play Skyrim at the end of the day without breaking a sweat.... cause that's what I currently have with this "bulky" device right now.

    Personally I think the author of that article is ignorant of the capabilities of convertible tabletPC's, and the user base who need those functions. The average consumer doesn't need a tabletPC, but they are not intended for an "average" consumer.
     
  4. NamelessPlayer

    NamelessPlayer Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I'm glad these tech pundits aren't in charge of the Tablet PC industry, because I like powerful convertibles like that. No need for a separate laptop and tablet. (Just put some decent dedicated GPUs in these things, for crying out loud!)

    I hate how tablets are becoming upscaled smartphones with limited functionality, though Android is making strides thanks to products like Samsung's Galaxy Note line, which may eventually become the Courier I was hoping for if development continues the way I want it to.

    On the other hand, he is right in that Fujitsu and the other manufacturers charge way too much of a premium for the good Tablet PCs, limiting their appeal. It's only thanks to second-hand sales on sites like eBay that I have the opportunity to afford these things. But I'd still take my 4-year-old HP 2730p, completely devoid of finger touch input or some other frills, over the vast majority of media slates on the market.

    For that matter, this reminds me a lot of all those pundits crying out for the death of the desktop. I can't stand those guys either, because they completely ignore the PC gaming market, the media production market, software programmers and developers, and all the other people who need the most performance for their dollar where portability and battery life are not concerns. They'd rather have us pay twice the price for half the performance and capabilities because it's portable and more mainstream.
     
  5. MCSmarties

    MCSmarties Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Hear, hear! Those are my thoughts exactly.

    The main reason this column really upsets me is not even that he's discouraging average consumers from buying a tablet PC (as opposed to a glorified iOS/Android toy), but that "real" tablet PC vendors (Fujitsu, HP...) can use exactly this attitude to justify their high pricing on these so-called "niche" products. :mad:
     
  6. stoneseeker

    stoneseeker Animator and Art Director Senior Member

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    not that I think it's price is justified by it's "niche-ness"... but wouldn't you say the tabletPC like the T902 and so on ARE kinda niche? I mean, not everyone really needs the ability to touch or draw on screen, most can get by just fine with a laptop or ultrabook.
     
  7. jhoff80

    jhoff80 Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    But there's already tablets that are just as powerful (some even with a Core i7 and dedicated GPUs) that have keyboard docks, such as the Transformer Book. So really, what's the benefit of the convertible form factor here? Like I said, I just see that being an increasingly small niche, with these newer hybrids taking the bulk of the (Windows tablet) sales.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2012
  8. Mitlov

    Mitlov Shiny

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    He doesn't compare it to an iOS or Android tablet. He compares it to the Surface Pro, which has Ivy Bridge, Windows 8 Pro, and a digitizer. We don't know the pricing of the Surface Pro yet, so let's compare it to the next-gen Series 7 Slate. That offers many of the same benefits (i5 processor, digitizer, Windows 8 Pro), but offers better resolution (1080p instead of 900p), and less than half the weight (1.89 lbs including keyboard dock), yet costs two-thirds as much (comparing base price of $1199 to base price of $1900...but the Fujitsu's base price doesn't include an SSD).

    He's not saying that the Fujitsu should be shunned in comparison to the iPad. He never once mentions iOS or Android. He says it should be shunned in comparison to the Surface Pro and its competition (such as the new Series 7 Slate), which offers just as much performance and far better portability at a far lower price.
     
  9. stoneseeker

    stoneseeker Animator and Art Director Senior Member

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    really?? Nowhere close to the performance. Can you put 16 gigs of ram in a S7S? The weak ultra low voltage processor is not even comparable in my mind to the full voltage ones in the T902/X230T.

    I've used both the old S7S and the T902, and the T902 outperforms in power by a landslide. Not to mention the screen in far bigger, with a higher resolution (than the older slates, the newer ones have higher resolutions and smaller screens).

    T902 and X230T are the only tabletPC's I know of that can effectively run After Effects and other heavy processing/Ram tasks. I understand not everyone needs that kind of power, but for those of that do, the T902 is perfect. Still wish it was cheaper, but it is offering more than the slates and transformers.
     
  10. MCSmarties

    MCSmarties Pen Pal - Newbie

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    You make a fair point here. I would answer "power and screen size".

    For me, anything smaller than 12" would just be too small to seriously work on - as in to actively CREATE something (write, paint, code etc.) rather than passively CONSUME (read, watch, listen, play) - for any length of time.
    I freely admit YMMV though.

    I would love the power, size and battery life of a T902, but with a detachable tablet screen and a $1800 MSRP!
     
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