Cintiq Pro 13 and 16

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by chocow8s, Nov 3, 2016.

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  1. kvoram

    kvoram Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I didn't mean for it to sound like it were the same as switching some screws. Of course it takes engineering efforts to adapt to different components, but they were not starting from scratch. I could imagine that they actually started with a FHD panel since that was their Cintiq13HD origin and then went to the QHD and UHD panels. Wacom likely tested a few different panels during R&D anyway before settling on the current ones. I doubt they chose an initial panel based on specs and then had a smooth ride with it. So a good chunk of those costs that you calculate with probably would have occurred already.

    Wacom is under big financial pressure, this year will be their first in history with a likely net loss and their stock value has dropped ~40% over a year. I think they wouldn't do this differentiation if it wasn't financially beneficial to them.
     
  2. ATIVQ

    ATIVQ V⅁O⅄ Senior Member

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    Wacom keeps making the mistake of going with cheap display parts for its premium products. The Cintiq Companions were way behind their competitors in terms of their display. Wacom moved up the quality scale with its MobileStudio Pro, but it's still a lot behind where it could be for that price - Thunderbolt 3, 10bpc display, Iris Pro graphics. We're talking about a device for graphics professionals here, and Wacom still can't bring themselves to use a 100% Adobe RGB display, and 10bpc is long overdue.
     
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  3. AvalonX

    AvalonX Scribbler - Standard Member

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    How do you use the Expresskey remote? It needs a standard USB connection.
     
  4. AvalonX

    AvalonX Scribbler - Standard Member

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    ALso, If I have a laptop that is not USB-C, wouldnt that mean I could not use 4K? Even with Wacom Link, I dont think USB3 can handle that unless I am mistaken.
     
  5. kvoram

    kvoram Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Wacom is likely going to offer either an adapter fore the receiver or a separate receiver with USB-C instead of USB-A. For now, you would simply need a USB-A to USB-C adapter for the receiver to use it.

    Your are mixing a few things up, USB3.0 bandwidth has nothing to do with the video signal here. You have these options:

    1) If your computer has a USB-C port, that port MUST support DisplayPort Alternate Mode (DP Alt Mode). If that is the case, you can connect the computer directly with USB-C to USB-C cable to the Cintiq Pro.

    2) If your computer does not have a "USB-C port with DP Alt Mode", you can simply use the regular video output on your computer and connect that to the included Wacom Link adapter, which has a DisplayPort input. If your computer has only HDMI output, you would also need to connect a HDMI to DP adapter inbetween. Whether you can use the 4k resolution on the Cintiq, and whether you can do that with 30 Hz or 60 Hz, is entirely dependent on what your computer is capable of.
     
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  6. AvalonX

    AvalonX Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I am reading this on the Wacom site:
    Graphics Input USB-C (for optimum performance) or Mini DisplayPort using optional Wacom Link

    I have an i5 Skylake w/16 GB ram. Its a Lenovo with a dedicated Nvidia 940m chipset. The display is only 1080p though and I have mini dp and HDMI. What does that mean for someone like me?
     
  7. ATIVQ

    ATIVQ V⅁O⅄ Senior Member

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  8. kvoram

    kvoram Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Your computer's graphics capabilities and Mini-DP port are perfectly fine to use even the Cintiq Pro 16 at it's full resolution, 4K@60Hz.

    So this is what your connections would be like:
    • One USB-C port on the Cintiq Pro connected to its power adapter.
    • Another USB-C port on the Cintiq Pro connected to the included Wacom-Link adapter.
    • Then you use a Mini-DP to Mini-DP cable to connect the Mini-DP port on the Wacom-Link adapter to the Mini-DP-port on your Lenovo laptop.
    • At last you use a USB-A to USB-A 3.0 cable to connect the USB-A port on the Wacom-Link adapter to a USB-A 3.0 port on your laptop.
    It is a bit of a cable mess, but that's how it needs to be. I wouldn't be worried about that "Graphics Input USB-C (for optimum performance)" quote on the Wacom site.
     
  9. AvalonX

    AvalonX Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Great, that helps a lot.
     
  10. NamelessPlayer

    NamelessPlayer Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Huh, so the Cintiq Pro models aren't bus-powered after all? LT1423p replacement this isn't!

    If they were bus-powered and just needed a single USB-C connection, it'd be a lot more convenient for the sorta use I planned with my Cintiq Companion Hybrid, but if I have to use AC power still, what's the point?

    Also, it's funny how we're just now starting to see 10 bits per color channel return to LCDs due to limitations in the video interface when I'm pretty sure Matrox and a few other graphics card vendors made a selling point of having 10-bit color channel RAMDACs back in the day, when VGA was still standard. Too bad Wacom hasn't seen fit to add that to the Cintiq Pro models, considering that they're going to be pitched at a more color-critical, image-conscious bunch.

    Anyway, the biggest question on my mind still remains: how the heck are they utilizing USB-C for video input? Some sorta unofficial take on DP alternate mode where it's an input instead of an output? This is what I don't like about USB-C to begin with - the extra functionality it purports is not guaranteed and highly variable depending on device.
     
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