Buying a new laptop sucks

Discussion in 'Windows 10' started by DRTigerlilly, Jul 5, 2020.

  1. DRTigerlilly

    DRTigerlilly Tablet Lead Mod (Retired) Super Moderator

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    and that's the whole post....
     
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  2. JoeS

    JoeS I'm all ears Senior Member

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    See, now that's where you went wrong, you should be looking for a penabled convertible.
     
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  3. DRTigerlilly

    DRTigerlilly Tablet Lead Mod (Retired) Super Moderator

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    I already have a penabled convertible (The SG12) and the convertible market sucks equally

    Only SSD is upgradeable in a select few
    everything else is soldered
    HORRIBLE webcams with the exception of the Surface line
    reliability issues

    I want an ultraportable but it must be durable
    have good (international) support

    I was all set to get an XPS 13 and the issues it seems to have are myriad.....
     
  4. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    FWIW. in our customer base, the most reliable systems are Dell Latitudes. You pay more and you don't get cutting edge features or performance usually.

    Second place would go to the Lenovo Thinkpads specifically the T and P Series. Less so with the rest of the Thinkpad line, and a total crapshoot with the yogas or ideapads.
     
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  5. JoeS

    JoeS I'm all ears Senior Member

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    Consumer Yogas only, or including the ThinkPad version of the Yogas? The 3rd gen X1 Yoga was a misfire, but the 4th gen seems to be back to being a quality product.
     
  6. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Both unfortunately though the most recent have been good so far.
     
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  7. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    I really like Dell laptops. I've owned nearly half a dozen of them over the years. I'm typing this on an eBay Latitude right now, acting as my daily grind desktop computer.

    I like how they design their computers to be easily serviced; you can swap out memory in nearly all their models, SSDs are easy to change, and their gear is all quite affordable. I don't think anybody else makes gear which you see on the low-end of their price margins at such decent build qualities. I've never paid more than $500 for Dell laptop, even new!

    However.., for stylus enthusiasts, their website is really hard to navigate. -If you dig deep enough to find a list of computer models which will work with their pens, like this list (which for some reason fails to include all the actual compatible models, the list should be three times as long, but whatever,):
    • Latitude 5285 2-in-1
    • Latitude 5289 2-in-1
    • Latitude 7285 2-in-1
    • Latitude 7389 2-in-1
    • Latitude 5290 2-in-1
    -Good luck finding the corresponding sales page for any of those model numbers! You can't. They list their for-sale computers by their fancy brochure names like, "Inspiron 15 3000 Laptop". -But what model number is that? You can't tell! It's mentioned nowhere on the actual sales page, (unless I'm blind; maybe somebody else can see it: https://www.dell.com/en-ca/shop/del...iron-laptops/15-inch?appliedRefinements=15676 ).

    After messing around for half an hour simply trying to work out what kind of pen-enabled laptop range they had, I came away confused and fed up and realized you were 100% right...

    "Buying A New Laptop Sucks!"

    (Though, I do find the problem of it all challenging and that's fun. Like a game you want to go back and try to solve. But most people aren't hobbyists in that way.)

    And anyway.., I think I might be a Samsung man now. Buying a Samsung 2-in-1 is easy, because there's a very narrow range, I know it, and I can now order it within Canada. :) (Samsung memory is all soldered, though... One size fits all, so you'd better make sure you fit!).
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2020
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  8. tcassidy

    tcassidy Pen Pal - Newbie

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    You have to add 5993 to the appliedRefinements for touch screen. Then look at the Features section on any 2 in 1. You will probably see a picture of a pen resting on the screen. What type of pen I can't say!

    Terry
     
  9. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    This wasn't/isn't intended as a total endorsement of Dell. The XPS systems especially the 13 inch have been innovative especially in moving towards small screen bezels and lightweight. But at the expense of some at least in the past, reliability and support tradeoffs.

    And that's by design, by far their bread and butter line is the latitude and companies like the iterative approach they use to model succession, support tools etc. And that same approach precludes cutting edge innovations. Ease of repair and common service parts are part of that as well. Put simply if you are a company of any size looking towards fleet deployments, Dell will do their level best to steer you to the latitudes.

    As to Lenovo based on what I've observed they push the A and T series thinkpads to corporate customers but also offer others like the x or carbon because they know a chunk of their customers are looking for something other than a generic laptop.

    However, I think it's an origin and emphasis issue. In other words the A and T series begin life as ThinkPads first, whereas the others start out as consumer models that get "ThinkPad-ized" for lack of a better description.

    PS: Samsung reliability trends toward ThinkPad levels, but the sample size is still too small to state that definitively. Additionally Samsung is hurt a great deal in the business segment by their helter skelter approach to model line development and continuation.
     
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  10. DRTigerlilly

    DRTigerlilly Tablet Lead Mod (Retired) Super Moderator

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    I was all set in my mind to get the xps 13...until I saw samples of the webcam, issues with swelling batteries, loose track pads, bluescreens and weird blacking out issues...

    Then I started looking at the HP spectre /envy 360.. Build quality issues... And I though of our own @dstrauss various returns... One reviewer had to return his unti 3 times to get ' a good one"

    My situation is complicated by the fact that though I buy my electronics in the US, I don't live there and have little incentive to visit for reasons we shall not go into here... Compounded by the pandemic... 3 returns???

    Then questions about good international support is another confounding issue. (which is why I initially was thinking Dell or bust)

    This also rules out Acer, Asus, Samsung (who always comes across as flaky/flighty and makes the oddest build/design decisions) and several others...

    OEM'S turning consumers I to unpaid product testers is frustrating

    I am exhausted


    Sent from my SM-N9600 using Tapatalk
     
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