Best Smartphone Companion for Surface Devices

Discussion in 'Microsoft' started by dstrauss, Jun 23, 2016.

  1. Kumabjorn

    Kumabjorn ***** is back Senior Member

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    Soo, you all would like to get your hands on a Samsung Fold, but balk at having your wallets or purses vacuumed clean. Well, Kuma comes to your rescue. You can actually get a Fold for a measly $400. Yepp, you read that right. 400 bucks for a brand new Samsung Fold. All you have to do is google Escobar Phone. That EP or should it be PE logo and screensaver says it all. But you can look at it as payback for all that cocaine money you wasted in the 90's.

    Seems Pablo's brother is trying to laundry some of that money through selling cheap ass phones. You have been duly warned, now go google and enjoy yourselves.
     
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  2. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    If true it's yet another case of what goes around comes around. There were a lot of small PC vendors in the early days (think windows 95) that would periodically appear with incredible prices and be gone a year later. The usually had an aggressive sales force combined with virtually no support services. When I was working at Viewsonic, we had one neighboring building that had three different PC companies occupy it in the time we were there.
     
  3. dstrauss

    dstrauss Comic Relief Senior Member

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    Kind of like trolling the back pages of Computer Shopper in the day...

    [​IMG]
     
  4. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    So yet another article on the Flip, this one dinging (pun intended) the durability of the display. It's interesting but as with some of the Razr tests , I'm having a bit of trouble with the idea that it reflects real world use. Kind of similar to my concern with benchmarks in general. e.g if you your workflow consists of doing mostly X , then a benchmark that focuses on x might have validity, but most don't do 90% x all day.

    To use one very specific example to us, one of our devices uses a display that when most customers first see it think at best that it's adequate. Then we show it to them again in the scenario that they will actually be using the device and the response is "wow that's impressive"

    Verge article below.
    https://www.theverge.com/2020/2/16/...ss-durability-scratch-test-jerryrigeverything
     
  5. dstrauss

    dstrauss Comic Relief Senior Member

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    The Verge article is a bit over the top (as are Nelson's Mohs test to begin with). In fact, the whole premise of whether your keys/coins will scratch a device is a bit ludicrous - I don't know anyone who carries their phone in the same pocket with sharp objects. Still, given that Corning is not trumpeting this triumph, I have my questions on whether this is truly glass or some sort of hybrid (or even like the rumored diamond covered plastics).

    What I really hope is that this shows up in a Galaxy Note Fold with an S Pen - companion device and mini tablet in one...
     
  6. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Part of the issue is the word "glass". The type of display in modern phones and computers has very little in common (other than a somewhat silica based substrate ) with the glass that has been around for a thousand years.

    The responsibility for what I would call consumer confusion is with Dow Corning, who invented the substance that was absolutely brilliantly marketed as "Gorilla Glass". In other words calling modern displays glass is like calling both a Model T and a 2020 Super Duty F250 Ford Truck a car.

    The other thing I think that reviewers are giving short shrift too is basic physics , which is that a substance's hardness (resistance to scratching) is inversely proportional to how "bendable: it is.

    All you have to do is think back to the Palm Pilot or even earlier stylus based "smartphones" such as the Treo. One of the astute things Apple determined was that the technology of capacitive touch, solved both soft feel and need for a stylus for precision in a handheld device and scratch resistance came along as a bonus.

    Again my $.02, but it reminds me often of the "why can't we have bright, color accurate displays with and anti glare surface. One of our common demonstrations to potential customers that insist on having both is a demonstration of how anti-glare works. Again it's simple physics, the light energy has to go somewhere and the best antiglare coatings really just do the best job of diffusing the light in the least image quality impacting way.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2020
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  7. Marty

    Marty Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    Could you elaborate on this? What kind of display was it, and what was the A-B scenario that caused such a dramatic difference?
     
  8. dstrauss

    dstrauss Comic Relief Senior Member

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  9. desertlap

    desertlap Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    @Marty I'm simplifying a bit but It's essentially a semi custom dual tech hybrid display (also quite pricey) with both IPS and VA layers.
    The reason the customers at first aren't impressed is that inside in a typical office it's not especially bright (though sufficient for it's use) but outside in really intense sunlight such as you will find in Saudi Arabia at noon it's still very readable.

    I know of only one other company that uses the tech and they buy much smaller displays (Garmin) The VA layer acts an an excellent anti-glare device, but requires an exceptionally powerful backlight when the VA layer is active.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2020
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  10. Tams

    Tams Scribbler - Standard Member

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    It's still not clear, but it would appear that the Z Flip's display does use glass and is more scratch-resistant than the Fold's (and that's inside display really isn't that bad). Samsung may have over-hyped the display a bit, but even in their promotional material, they don't seem to have made that much of a point about durability.
    I think this is mainly some of the lesser media just trying to find bad news because that gets more attention. As they always do.

    And yes, some of the blame does lie with Corning for changing what people perceive as 'glass'.

    Luv ya, dstrauss, but you are the worst for helping with buying decisions!
     
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