Asus VivoTab Note 8 - Reviews

Discussion in 'Asus' started by PECgem, Jan 7, 2014.

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  1. jnjroach

    jnjroach Technology Strategist Super Moderator

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    Anything with Android is a compromise....every device is a compromise its part of life.
     
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  2. efjay

    efjay Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Thanks and for me this is a key point. If it works for normal note taking I will be fine with it and as I only plan to use it for that purpose I think I will be happy with this tablet.

    Can I ask what you think of the speakers and are you able to check if you can sync and charge at the same time? Thanks.




    Sent from my Lumia 1020 using Tapatalk
     
  3. WuBoy

    WuBoy Scribbler - Standard Member

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    I'm not making any decisions now. The good thing about tablets is you can go to the stores and play with them before hand, so if I see that it's not that big of and issue I'll still get it. It's just that I'd prefer a bigger screen to begin with, so having to settle for a smaller screen and then having part of that screen potentially unusable is a little worrisome.

    Not true and not true. When I look for a new phone, I have no problem finding exactly what I want and need. That's not to say that Android phones have no problems. They do of course, but I at least have enough options that I can find something that has the strengths that I want and weaknesses that don't affect me as much. The same goes for Android tablets as consumption devices. That said, I feel like Windows is a much better OS for productivity. The difference with Windows is you basically have to accept what Intel or the OEMs or Microsoft dictates to be the best thing to have because they all make the same thing and don't really try to fill the holes. Just go look at some of the OEMs that make both Windows and Android tablets. Look how much variety they have in their Android selection when compared to the Windows options. I get what you're saying. You're always going to have to take some good with the bad, but at least with Android you can almost customize what good you'll get with what bad. You can do that with Windows computers but not so much with tablets at this point.
     
  4. Mesosphere

    Mesosphere Geek. Senior Member

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    Yea, as I've said before. I would find this screen to small as my primary note taker, so I get where you are coming from, but I think the problem is much larger than 1 cm.

    Regarding compromises, I'd say the android OS itself is a compromise. There are compromises with windows OS as well, but the point is, I agree with jnjroach, there are always compromises. Sometimes the areas of compromise aren't drawbacks for a given use case or user, but a blanket statement that there are no compromises in android devices is just not true.
     
  5. spinedoc77

    spinedoc77 Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    It all depends on the user of course, but I agree that Android (and iOS) are major compromises. I say that because with a windows tablet I can plop it into a dock with a large screen and have a full windows solution which can run most anything I throw at it. If I dock an android or iOS tablet like that then I just have a consumption device on a large screen. That's pretty insanely powerful to me.

    I don't even think iOS is in the same league IMO as they don't offer a stylus at all, having this weird disdain for what humans have been using as a writing tool for centuries. Android at least have some very few stylus equipped models, but it seems only Samsung has really pushed for a good stylus experience.

    PS... The incredible part IMO is things like Bluestacks, which allows me to run a full Android OS inside of my windows tablet. I can have the best of both worlds.
     
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  6. AmbiDextrose

    AmbiDextrose Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Why do you want to write up to the edge anyway? I've used OneNote and regular notebooks/copy paper as the need dictates and, even going as far back as primary school, I've always left a margin on either side of the page. I seldom go right to the edge when I'm taking notes unless I'm sketching (which I also do quite often). On OneNote, if I prefer extending past the edge, I'll pan the page around 1cm BEFORE I reach the edge. Plus, with OneNote, you still have the UI elements (i.e., menu, scrollbars) so, really, only the left edge is free for inking.

    So how does Samsung get around the edge issue with Wacom? There are two things they could be doing: (1) using a digitizer that's slightly larger (may be 1mm on each side) than the screen or (2) using an LCD panel that has less EM interference. Remember that Samsung manufactures it's own LCD panels (not an OEM like IBM) and, in fact, my Samsung Series 7 slate (pre Wacom-Samsung partnership) has infinitely better edge tracking than my old Toshiba Tecra M4 and M7 TabletPCs. Also, Samsung is now a stakeholder in Wacom so it's not so far-fetched that Samsung could be using custom Wacom digitizer boards.

    Have I seen for myself? No. But I will offer these observations - when I was still building DIY-Cintiqs using the large Intuos2 tablets (15in at 4:3), I saw a lot of edge tracking and jitter when I used 15in LCD panels (e.g., LTN150UL02) which went right up to the edge of the digitizer sensor. However, when I tried a 12in panel, the edge tracking issues were reduced to being negligible. When I dismantled the 15in LCD panel to replace the CCFL backlight with a custom LED backlight, I noticed that the LCD frame and clips that hold the panel together are made of metal. Because metal, in general, can act as an antenna and interfere with EM signals, I fabricated a new frame out of styrene sheets. When I tried using the 15in panel again, the edge tracking and jitter issues were eliminated.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2014
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  7. dstrauss

    dstrauss Comic Relief Senior Member

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    True and true. To even use Android I'd have to compromise and give up OneNote, as well as the rest of the Office suite; Touchdown is no analog for Outlook - the list goes on and on. It is too early in the game to dismiss the Windows app store entirely - there is plenty of crapware in the App Store and GooglePlay markets as well. With OEM's just now filling the Windows tablet pipeline, and the promise of Bay Trail goodness, the future is bright.
     
  8. v@gelis

    v@gelis Pen Pal - Newbie

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    No, no problem with Galaxy Note 8. The only "problem" is that android , after using windows tablet pc's in 8inch form factor seems obsolete to me. No OneNote (full version, not the choppy found in android marketplace), no full office, no legacy/serious apps.
    Other than that, state that the windows 8 clear type technology help "mask" the "old" 1280X800 resolution, contradiction to what the android seems to the Galaxy Note 8.
    So, at this point, I am anxiously awaiting for the replacement device to arrive in a few days...
     
  9. jhoff80

    jhoff80 Pen Pro - Senior Member Senior Member

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    I have to agree with AmbiDextrose and I think it was Steve B also.

    I've never really liked writing near the edges (it's not as comfortable with my hand only half having something to lean on), and in my use, the only time I come close to reaching the edge is when I'm trying to fit one last word in that typically ends up being a little messy but usable.

    And yeah, I don't care if Android was a million times better than Windows (which I don't think it is, but that's besides the point)... OneNote alone is enough to keep me using Windows (and I've in fact said it before in the opposite way - that as much as I like my Lumia 1020, I'd switch to a Note 3 instantly if the Android version was actually full featured).

    At this point, I definitely feel like I'll be getting the Asus to at least try it out. The reviews have been in line with what I was expecting and haven't changed anything for me. I just am not entirely sure what actual need I have for it. My Surface has met my needs perfectly for a single-device solution (well, two devices if you include the smartphone but I wasn't) so it might end up just getting returned very quickly.
     
  10. lovelaptops

    lovelaptops My friends call me Jeff Senior Member

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    Anti - glare certainly helps but IM0 there's nothing like good old backlight and plenty of it to make outdoor usability practical. To wit: I canot see anything on my Galaxy s4 (220 nit) but on my Nexus 7 (550 nit) I have little trouble except in direct sunlight and you can barely read a newspaper in that light. Pretty much same with my Galaxy N8 (460 nit). I don't recall reading brightness measurements for the Dell VP8 or other 8" W8 tablets, but I have a feeling they are somewhere in the 300s, which is barely sufficient even with a matte screen. And it doesn't appear that super bright screens are prohibitively expensive given what is on the $229 Nexus 7 or the $150 Asus Memo Pad - and they are FHD whereas I would prefer cheaper 1280 × 800 anyway. Add an anti- glare screen (nicer to write on) and work outside to your heart's content!

    Not sure why full Windows 8 tablets shouldn't (subject to RAM or storage limitations) be as customizable as a "Windows computer,"as you term it. I think the main reason OEMs aren't offering more variations of W8 tablets is because they still represent a tiny fraction of the market and building multiple form factors and configurations requires costly investment. (Wouldn't it be nice if they could just yank out the ARM Soc and Android firmware and software and slip in a Bay Trail chipset BIOS and Windows 8 the way some do going from Intel to AMD cpus?) . A second reason we're not seeing more 10"Bay Trail models is the apparent subsidies by Intel and MS on the 8"models. (Let's see now, Windows doesn't make an 8"Surface but they do make 10"ones; 8"W8 tablets retail at $299, while their 11"brethren or closer to $800. Do you think the extra plastic and bigger screens cost $500 more to make?) But here's what I think is the major reason no one (except Intel and MS) are investing much in W8 tablets: except for us lunatic fringe, One Note-crazed tableteers from way back, there is little demand for a 0.8 lb, full fledged Windows computer. You can view nearly all - and create much as well - Windows/0ffice content from several Office"clones" available in Android and there are plenty of good handwriting apps for those who don't know/don't care how much more powerful and useful One Note is.

    Otherwise I would wager the masses - including those who use some Windows legacy apps either don't feel the need for their companion tablet to run them and/or have found a compatible or substitute Android app at least good enough to use when on the go and their laptop isn't handy. More important people have become highly dependent on the Play Store apps they use daily in ways they never imagined a laptop to serve them. I would wager the majority would rather do without Windows X 86 software on their tablets than do without their cherished apps and games. We have Apple and the media to thank for brainwashing the masses that a tablet is, a) a slate that allows you to consume curated content in a most pleasing way, surf the web and read email. b) in almost any circumstance, such a device is all you need to have with you, so you can just leave that heavy laptop with its anachronistic "Keyboard" at home! Android tablets, then are for Apple - haters and people who care less about the pretty presentation and more about customizing their device, either because we're tech nerds or so that we can also use it as a compromise productivity tool - using Bluetooth Keyboard or pen input in most cases. Still, with laptops getting smaller and lighter I think most see the the slate - even Android - as a companion device, primarily for consumption and light input, with the 2 lb, 11" laptop reasonably close at hand for "real" work (though the media claims we're not using laptops at all!)

    How I do go on...:( Just one clarification: I do not in any way fit the description of the consumption- tablet consumer! Just trying to characterize the market I see it and explain why mfrs are slow to commit to W8 slates, much less w/active digitizers, good screens and sufficient ports. I want a slate on which I can do 60-70% of my work, dummit! Just preparing to either sacrifice much of what I want, or pay through the nose. Curses Apple! Curses Media!!


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