Artic Silver 5 = Lower Temps...?

Discussion in 'Acer (Gateway)' started by Spartikiss, Jan 21, 2009.

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  1. Spartikiss

    Spartikiss Scribbler - Standard Member

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    So...

    My brother had a problem with his computer overheating. I had him get some Arctic Silver 5 from the Local RadioShack. His computer didn't really benefit because I think the heatsink on his laptop is broken...

    But on the C140...

    Wow...

    SpeedFan used to show my idle at about 33-36C... I'm running at about 22-24C now.

    I know this might sound like I'm pushing the product... I'm not. I'm pushing for people that experience any type of overheating issues to do what I did...

    The heatsink on th C140 makes contact at three different points ... 1 is on the CPU, 1 is on the MB and 1 is on the GPU (for those with the ATI graphics card, I'm not sure about those without the ATI graphics card)...

    The MB and GPU are connected with the heatsink via heat transfer tape, but the CPU has some standard heat transfer compound from Gateway...

    Switch that out on all 3 contact points... with some premium heat transfer compound.

    I used the Arctic Silver 5, but there's tones of other thermal transfer compounds out there that will do the trick.

    A very good review over at Tom's Hardware will give you a good idea of the differences between different ones and overall good information of what to expect:

    http://www.dansdata.com/goop.htm

    For those of you that HAVE already done this, please take a moment and post your before and after temps for for the C140...

    Before:

    Avg 33-36C at idle

    After

    Avg 22-24C at idle

    Hope this was helpful and if any of you feel I was pushing the arctic silver 5 too much, please let me know. I'll try to edit this to mention it less.

    -Spart
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 18, 2015
  2. clads01

    clads01 Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Spart --

    I'm thinking of doing this right now. Can you clarify -- did you remove the pre-existing thermal pads before adding the AC5, or did you add the AC5 on top of the thermal pads? The former makes more sense from a heat transfer perspective, but there's significant thickness to the pads and I'm worried that there won't be sufficient contact force (or even any sufficient contact at all) between the chips and the heatsink without using the pads.

    Thanks.
     
  3. Spartikiss

    Spartikiss Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Wow...

    I'm glad you brought this old post back to life...

    Here's what's up...

    I hadn't really experienced many problems the first week or so after having replaced the heat transfer pads... BUT about a month or two AFTER I replaced the pads with AC5 I ended up experiencing some CRAZY high temps...

    What happened?

    Well jut like you said, there was just too much space and not enough contact...

    What did I do?... Well I really didn't have very many options because I had actually gone ahead and disposed of the pads and buying just enough of that material to cover the 3 chips is damn near impossible (no one seems to sell them in anything but rolls...? ... Whuh?)

    So I very, Very, VERY carefully bent the heatsink so that it would make the appropriate amount of contact on the board and the right places... This comes out to be a lot of trial and error, but the easiest way to check...

    1) Apply the ABSOLUTE thinnest amount of AC5 (or any other HTC stuff that you have) that you can to the contact points on the chips and try for as smooth of a surface as possible...

    2) Remount the heatsink (make sure to tighten everything up all the way)...

    3) Remove and check the heatsink. If you can see that it is pressing and marring the face of the compound then when you apply the actual amount of HTC then it should spread out enough to provide thermal conductivity.

    I hope this helps...

    Ordering the new CPU and parts for my C-140 this month... Hope all goes well...

    -Spart
     
  4. clads01

    clads01 Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Thanks for the response. Yeah, I was worried about those big gaps. I'm gonna leave the thermal pads in place -- or maybe replace with some thermal pad material that came with a hard drive cooler I bought. Not really keen on bending the heat sink, although I'll have another look at it next time I open her up ...
     
  5. gaidensensei

    gaidensensei Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Wow, nice read!

    It's the same methodology with desktops as well, I suppose - adding too much thermal paste is detrimental and can contribute to overheating. Like overclockers say, too much is worse than too little.

    Also I had to add - it's amusing that Spartikiss got to reply a year after the original post.
     
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