Applying thermal paste

Discussion in 'Asus' started by ivang, May 22, 2008.

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  1. yogi

    yogi Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Hi there. Well, I just finished cleaning the fan in my R1F. Did a though cleaning by removing the heatsink from the cpu which got me thinking about maybe applying some thermal paste to the cpu. Wouldn't mind having the temperature drop a bit. So I was wondering if anyone has any experience with applying thermal paste on a R1F or any other laptop for that matter?
     
  2. TabbedOut

    TabbedOut Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I have... instructions here
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 18, 2015
  3. yogi

    yogi Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Sorry for the late reply....been swamped at work. Well, I think I'm going to give it a try. Goggled around a bit and ended up opting for OCZ's Freeze thermal compound. Thanx for the instructions.
     
  4. ivang

    ivang Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Applying thermal paste is a science/art; reason why big assembly lines at the large mnfr's use thermal pads, not paste which is better but can be worst if not applied correctly.

    You want to have a completely thin and even layer, thin layer is best for fast heat dissipation, more is not better and takes longer to dissipate the heat therefore will get hotter and if not applied completely evenly than its a waste, because it will not work properly and heatup even more.
     
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