Any tips for a better pressure curve on a tablet PC?

Discussion in 'Artists' started by T-ravisty, Jan 10, 2014.

  1. Azzart

    Azzart Late night illustrator Senior Member

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    There's another tool that, between other things, lets you tweak the pressure curve that works on the surface pro 3: Lazy Nezumi.
    And with more control than Microsoft own app.

    It's not free but if you're a serious artist working with Photoshop you might want to give it a try. You may end up asking yourself how you were able to live before... :D

    https://lazynezumi.com/home
     
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  2. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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    <<...more control than Microsoft own app...>>

    ...As I read the webpage and the FAQs, this tool only works with Wacom technology? So only the Surface Pro (1) and Surface Pro 2?
     
  3. Azzart

    Azzart Late night illustrator Senior Member

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    Everything works, I just checked again on a surface pro 3 with photoshop cc2014 ;)
     
  4. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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    <<...Everything works...>>

    Azzart: Thanks for the follow-up!
     
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  5. ron2k_1

    ron2k_1 calibuchi Senior Member

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    This is one funky tool! But besides the squiggly brush, which you can create as a custom brush, what is the practical application?

    I see that pressure curve can be customized for speed, and historical average and all that. But you as a professional make use of it?

    Swiped from my Galaxy Note 4 using Tapatalk
     
  6. Azzart

    Azzart Late night illustrator Senior Member

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    Lazy Nezumi main purpose has always been being a stroke smoothing tool.
    Think you have to do comic like lineart drawings: in that case it helps a lot since Photoshop has no stroke smoothing options (and I have no good hand even if I'm an illustrator).

    This was the feature I always knew it for.
    I rediscovered it just the other day because I bought a surface pro 3 and, contrary to the cintiq companion, the pen definitely needs some kind of software stabilizer if you need to do slow, deliberate strokes.

    And I discovered it became a great drawing asistant tool nowadays: aside from stroke smoothing, it helps with pressure curve and pressure smoothing, it have that strange distorted lines generator that could be of help in some way and, more importantly, a serie of curve, ellipse an perspective assistant/constraints that are really the icing on the cake.

    To me it values all the few bucks it costs. ;)
     
  7. lblb

    lblb Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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  8. thatcomicsguy

    thatcomicsguy Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    I tried Lazy Nezumi a year ago, (I don't know if it has been updated or not since), and while I could see how it might be of use, I found the built-in brush stabilization algorithms in nearly every Japanese art program much more satisfying and reliable.

    Paint Tool Sai has the best version, I think. Drawing with that software is dreamy!

    Mangastudio 5 is also quite excellent. -I still use a little program called "Manga Labo", (one of Portal Graphics old offerings). -It's barely supported now, only allows for 32bit usage, but I just pull layouts in from Photoshop for inking, so the file sizes aren't an issue. It's a very solid little inking tool.

    I've not tried the most recent Photoshop, but the version I run is hopeless when it comes to brush stabilization.
     
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  9. fishdavis

    fishdavis Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Thanks for the mention, I picked it up over Christmas and it's been really useful with my Asus Vivotab Note 8. I even use it sometimes on my Cintiq. On the Note 8 (which has less precise lines) it's saved me a lot of cleanup time in PS. totally worth the $
     
  10. GFXmonkey

    GFXmonkey Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Yeah, I've been using Lazy Nezumi this past year and I really like it. I will even use it on occasion in Clip Paint Studio, because it will produce extremely smooth lines. It is a life saver in Photoshop. It is also useful with just a regular Intuos tablet because it helps compensate for the slight wonkiness of drawing where you are not looking.
     
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